Instructables

Resin Jewelry Tutorial with John W. Golden Part 3

video Resin Jewelry Tutorial with John W. Golden Part 3
A how-to video for using epoxy resin, silver-plated rings and pewter pendant trays to create jewelry from reproductions of your artwork. Part 3 of 3.

See John's finished rings, pendants and artist's reproductions at johnwgolden.etsy.com.
rapps2 years ago
John, I have held onto an epoxy product for a long while not being overly bold about trying it. I have these wonderful items to cast into Jewelry but...there they sit. Thank you for the help, I can get them ready for the holiday sales now.
johnwgolden (author) 6 years ago
Thanks pipeski! I appreciate your comments as well. I understand what you folks are saying. I think my biggest mistake was not being familiar enough with what appears to be the expected format here on Instructables. Everything I share in the video was learned from extensive reading on the internet, and my hope was to fill a void that I perceived for folks like myself who want to see the entire process, not read about it so much. This was not originally made as an "Instructable" either, which I see can work against it here. Before trying resin, the process seemed very intimidating to me, and in my experience, a surprising number of other people, and my hope was that the pacing and length of the video would help to convey that it is a relatively easy process if you take your time, and if you spend more time prepping your art than pouring the resin, you get better results. I do repeat myself, precisely because it was video, and I really wanted to emphasize sealing the art properly. I considered putting more text in the video with parts list and such, but there is an old saying in video production, "If I wanna read, I'll get a book". It's hard for me to get past that some times. I realize everything in the video can be conveyed in words and with minimal amounts of video and photos, but I am an artist, not a writer, and as I am targeting this to folks interested in the arts, I went the visual route. That said, I realize now that for this to be effective here, it should follow the structure you folks have suggested. I will work on revising this to be more effective here.
I learned so much from watching this video--thanks for doing it. Unlike some commenters, I appreciate that you took the time to explain all the little tips and tricks that make a project successful.

One thought about the seepage problem. Have you tried putting a coat of Mod Podge around the edges of the paper after you've cut your pieces out? That might be enough to seal the edges so the resin doesn't seep into the paper.
Don't you dare! This video was AMAZING and extremely well done! I would not change any part of it. It emphasized that not all things can be thrown together in a minute. Art takes time if you want it done right and be worth a darn. I also believe that if you want to read then a video is not the proper format as it is meant to be watched. Thank you for taking time out of your day and life to teach us. Some may not have been worthy of the gift.
that was the mostest awesomenest instructable ever and now i'm pumped to try it out. . . .thanks!!!!!!
ezrablu3 years ago
This is THE best Instructable I've ever seen on here yet! THANK YOU for taking the time to explain everything completely and not just the general ideas leaving people to guess what should be done.

BEYOND AWESOME!
dchall86 years ago
OH...MY...GOD!

Even though my eyeballs are shooting blood after watching a 30 minute infomercial that would have taken 5 minutes to read (twice) in the normal Instructables format, I still like this project enough to offer suggestions.

1. PLEASE go back through your video and do whatever you have to do to speed up the part where we're watching glue dry. And anything else that does not require us to see the real-time speed with which you do things should be skipped or sped up. The only two speed-critical things in the tutorial are the epoxy stirring and the pouring from the condiment bottle. As you pointed out you really don't want to introduce bubbles, so the speed with which you do those two steps is important to see. But beyond that this should really go a lot quicker. Seriously!

2. Have you tried using a roller to paint the Mod Podge onto the paper? Have you tried printing onto plastic coated freezer paper?

3. Have you tried Elmer's or other white glue instead of Mod Podge? I ask this mostly because one of my pet peeves since Mod Podge was invented has been people calling it Modge Podge. Elmer's is easier to pronounce, less expensive (not much), and pretty much the same product.

4. Have you tried anything but Mod Podge to stop the air bubbles? If you are still getting air bubbles from under the art, you might apply the Mod Podge to the pendant with a condiment bottle (or from an Elmer's glue bottle). Pour enough to cover the bottom of the plate out to the edges and place the art into the pool of glue before pressing it down. You're the expert and I know you only painted 3 coats, but as long as that part takes to view it seems like you have hand painted 50 coats of Mod Podge before you pour the epoxy. Can't you cut the art, fill the pewter with Mod Podge, and sink the art down into it?

5. The last thing you flashed (literally) in your video is the source for your supplies. I would suggest you post that information as text under each of your three videos. What is the name of the epoxy, glue, pendants, etc., and where did you get them. Oh and what should we expect to pay for them? Sometimes that part will determine whether we're interested. For example if the epoxy costs $60 for a quart, that might suggest to some people that this project is not something they might want to try.

6. In fact relative to number 5 above, you should make amatestudios.com a clickable link. I misread it and typed amateurstudios.com which is more of a link to porn sites.

7. Where did you say you got your art? Do you print it on an inkjet printer? There's absolutely no way I'm going back to watch it again to find out.

All in all I think this is a great project but could benefit greatly from being rewritten as a real Instructable. Write up an intro, illustrated parts list with sources to buy from, prices, and list of the disposables (wax paper, cups, stirrers, etc.), and illustrated several steps of instructions. Include about 10-20 high quality photos and about 30 seconds of total video to show stirring and pouring speed.
Really???? This man took his time to show us how the process is done. Sure others do things different but if you didn't want to watch it you could have clicked off. I appreciate the video and the time he took to show how he does it. I use a lighter to bust my bubbles and it seems to help. Making the trays to put your items in is a great idea. Mine are you all over the place and I do tend to get the drips down the side at times. I am going to try to make some trays up. Thanks for the ideas and all the tips. I really appreciate it.
jaims dchall85 years ago
what's the point of this comment. appreciate what he took time and effort to create and stop complaining. it's so silly and completely unnecessary. thank you for this awesome series of videos john. it's better to be thorough and actually learn something than quick and completely unhelpful.
dchall8 jaims5 years ago
Read the comment all the way through and you'll see that every paragraph is constructive criticism. What was the point of your comment?
libbeylina6 years ago
Thank you so much for this tutorial. And thank you for being willing to give away your secrets to those who might become competitors. I've been wanting to learn this process so that I could make key chains for friends with photos of their children. I was so thankful to find this online. I really appreciate the pace and the details you provided. I didn't mind the legnth of your explanation like others have said. You can also find pendant blanks at www.delphiglass.com. Do a search for pendants and you'll find all kinds... Now I need to find a tutorial on making pendants, key chains, ornaments by sandwiching a photo between two pieces of glass and soldering around the edges. I've tried it and can't get the solder to flow well. If anyone knows where I can find this please let me know. Thanks so much for putting this online.
Given that your comment is way old you may already know this but, what your after is metal cane that's used in stained glass. If anyone wants to learn how to do this type of thing find a class that teaches stained glass making. Its really easy to do but really easy to mess up too.
I have not actually tried this myself but I have seen the finished product. Ones I have seen used copper or some other metal foil aound the edges of the two pieces of glass then melt the solder onto the foil. I believe the foil is available at places that sell stained glass supplies. If you have tried using foil I apologise for the waste of time.
racque3 years ago
I agree--John, you do ROCK. I learned more in these tutorials than anything else I've seen. I've used resin before, but really appreciate all the attention to detail that you've given. Your prep, soft explanations, and uses of bad examples are true teacher expertise.

I'm appalled at the "constructive comments" as well. I am a HS teacher--i would show these exactly as given. Did i need to see every single thing you showed after being an artist and art teacher for over 40 years? Probably not. However, not everyone comes into a craft with the same experiences--your videos show things from the ground up.

Mod Podge or Modge Podge---who cares??? and if you do much paper crafting, paper jewelry or scrapbooking, you quickly learn there's a huge difference in Elmer's & other true decoupage or crafting mediums. Everything has it's purpose.

If a video is too slow for you, then use that little button at the bottom and speed it up. OR better yet, use the little stop button!
Maproot3 years ago
John, you rock! This tutorial is better than classes I've taken , and really don't understand the ahem "constructive comments"
You were clear about what you did and one of the best parts was showing all the prep work

This was clear concise and wonderful and I really appreciate your work on this
Thanks!
Teresa_kaz3 years ago
I wonder, would an original watercolor mini painting, does on say..Arches paper be able to withstand the liquidy resin and not bleed? I'd love to find a better way to frame my mini art pins then my current method.
Teresa_kaz - I've made a bunch of jewelry and cabinet pulls using resin and my original watercolours. It works beautifully. Some of the pieces are 5-6 years old and still look brand new. Have fun!
I'm pretty sure that as long as you cover it with Mod Podge or something similar it would be fine. I use Mod Podge for a lot of projects I do, and it works great as anything you use it for, in my experience. Just make sure your paint is very dry, it should work.
Dude...very cool, patient, informative and right on. Thanks, Rock (HVD GUY)
Treksie5 years ago
I really enjoyed the way you put together your three-part tutorial. Your directions were simple, clear and prepared me for the pitfalls! Lovely photography. Great work!
mat.xiii5 years ago
Nice instructable. Have you thought of using some sort of vibration table to get the bubbles out? An orbital sander works well. It can just be held on the table top and you can do all the pieces at once. You might need to secure the pieces a bit better though as it is a bit industrial.
The tutorial is great! Despite my short attention span, i found this to be very useful. I love finding unique and stylish items, but i love making them even more! I appreciate the video format, because it highlights some things that might be missed in a series of photos. Your efforts are commended, despite the "constructive criticism" previously listed. Those who can, do. Those who can't, criticize. Kudos.
deshack5 years ago
YOU ARE AWESOME!!! I am so thankful you made this tutorial cause I have been looking for a thorough explanation as to how to do this! I think the length was perfect and I'm glad you showed us more of a real time scenario. Again, thank you!!! Why aren't you selling on etsy.com?
lagatina5 years ago
I have always wanted to try epoxy artwork, and I found your tutorial really useful,I didn't feel that it was long or that it repeat things without need,otherwise I wouldn't have seen it,and I like video tutorials,I think they are good for "visual" people, of course,a written instruction is useful, but sometimes it's just not enough to understand the whole process.The only complain I have is that I have no idea what modge podge is,I'm from another country,and have never heard of it,is it some kind of glue? That said, I thank you for your video,keep doing this tutorials.
Good instructions, thanks! What kind of paper do you use for your printouts, and what resolution is your artwork at when it's printed?
I'm also wondering what kind of paper is used for the printouts on the tutorial and at what resolution is your artwork. I found your tutorial very useful. Thanks!
johnwgolden (author)  cooper776 years ago
Hey there, I use Epson printers, so I use the best matte surface paper that Epson makes. It is Epson Ultra Premium Presentation Paper Matte. I print at 150dpi for most of these. Epsons still look very sharp at that setting.
TheChemist6 years ago
Where did you get your settings for the rings and pendants? Props.
static6 years ago
While I understand a video instructable may be the easy way to go about it, they do leave many people out in the cold. For many dial up internet access is the only option they have, slow dial up at that. Not that they are too tight to spring for better, just cable, DSL, or a WISP isn't available to them. Consider creating illustrated text instructable and embed the video for those who can handle the video.
cannedsquid6 years ago
THank you for making this instructable, sorry so many people are being rude, critical and obnoxious. I will use this to make some jewelry, so thanks! Can you recommend a findings resource?
johnwgolden (author)  cannedsquid6 years ago
HEy there,

I am still trying to find a retailer for the rings, but the pendants cn be purchased at Artway:

http://polymerclayexpress.com/findings.html
John, I really appreciated this Instructible, and really didn't have problems with the length of it. I felt as if I were in a resin-jewelry class - something I've done, BTW, and you did a far better job of explaining the pitfalls than the teacher. You did repeat yourself a bit, which I think was so you could fill the silence while you were performing an action, specifically when you coated the items with Mod-Podge. (Am I the only one on Earth who _doesn't_ call it 'Modge Podge?'). I think that you might do well to have a smaller brush to apply Mod Podge to the relatively small corners and edges of the bezel cup. Could you be introducing bubbles into your work during the Mod Podge application? You appeared to be plopping the Mod Podge into the bezel cup, which could give air bubbles a place to hide. Lastly, your description says that you use silver-plated rings and pewter bezel-cups, but I never heard you say that. If you added that bit and perhaps a source for the cups, even if it is "Most large jewelry supply sites carry pewter bezel cups" as a throwaway line that just conveys that bit of information. Once again, I thank you for putting this Instructible up. I feel a lot more confident about making such items,
johnwgolden (author)  SlothOnSpeed6 years ago
Thanks for the input SOS :)
I agree with quite a bit of what the other people said about the lenght of the instructable, but this is still pretty awesome! It's a great idea and I'm definetly going to try it out!
pipeski6 years ago
I agree with a lot of what dchall8 has said. Video can be useful, but I think you could probably trim out 70% of what you have there and still get all of your points across. I fast-forwarded through most of it. The background music was soul-destroying and you have a tendency to over-explain simple points and repeat yourself. As dchall8 said, your instructable could really be improved by using text and images rather than video, by listing materials and suppliers, and by keeping things concise. Despite the criticism, you have the makings of a great instructable there.
johnwgolden (author) 6 years ago
Hey there dchall8, Thanks for taking the time to let me know your thoughts about the video. I will consider your points as I work to make this fit better into the Intructables format.
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