Introduction: Rhubarb & Honey Jam

With the health issues of my wife and sons I make jams and fruit desserts for them out of natural ingredients and artificial sweeteners, every spring I make Rhubarb & Honey Jam for them.

Although you can pick Rhubarb all summer long and into the fall the best time to pick Rhubarb is in the spring when it is the sweetest.

Honey is a natural preservative so the ingredients of this recipe are simple Rhubarb and Honey, sometimes to change up the jam a little I add sugar free Strawberry Jell-O to the recipe.

The rhubarb I picked myself and the honey I got from a local producer, this jam takes two hours to make.

Step 1: Ingredients

Start by gathering your ingredients and supplies.

2 cups diced rhubarb

2 cups honey

½ cup water

1 packet sugar free Jell-O

Tools

Knife

Cutting board

250 ml containers

Funnel

A large bowl

Cooking Spoon

Measuring cup

Pot

Step 2: Preparing and Cooking

Start by trimming the ends of the rhubarb removing the leaves and the root from the stems.

Then dice the rhubarb into manageable pieces place them in the pot.

Add the honey and water to the pot and simmer until the rhubarb is soft.

Let stand in pot to cool, at this time if you want to change up the recipe a little add the Jell-O.

Pasteurized honey is heated to 160˚ pasteurizing honey is a different thing than pasteurizing dairy products. One of the few things that can live in honey is yeast, all nectar the source for all honey and it contains osmophilic yeasts, which can reproduce in higher-moisture content honey and cause fermentation. Although fermented honey does not necessarily pose any health risk the rhubarb can encourage it by adding moisture, so you need to pasteurize the rhubarb and honey to kill any latent yeast cells that might be present and to remove any chance of fermentation.

Step 3: Bottling

Wash and let dry the bottles prior to filling with jam.

Using the funnel add the jam to the bottle to just below the screw on lip.

Screw the lids on the jars loosely.

Step 4: Sterilizing

Once you have filled the jam jars place them in a pot with water that goes half way up the jars and boil the water for thirty minutes.

Remove the jam jars from the boiling water and tighten the lids and let stand until the jars are cool checking the lids periodically to make sure they are sealed.

Step 5: Finished

This is the easiest recipe for jam I have ever used since Honey is a natural preservative there are very few ingredients.

Comments

author
DizzyDeeCrafts (author)2014-05-28

Thank you Josehf, I've read the recipe and comments and will be trying this myself using pastuerised honey, maybe Manuka? I shall check back when I've had a chance to make some!

author

I have tried this no cook freezer jam with straw berries it was Ok.

I don’t know how well it will work with rhubarb because rhubarb is hard when raw.

http://www.clubhouse.ca/en/products/detail.aspx?No_Cook_Freezer_Jam_gelling_powder&id=c3fab820-1ef0-45b1-b264-e19918e8eeff

Joe

author
mnmama (author)Josehf Murchison2014-05-29

Right. My plan is to simmer the rhubarb in the water to cook, soften, and release the pectin, then cool and add honey to taste. After that, I will keep what I can use in a week in the fridge, and freeze the rest for later use. Hoping to have the best of both worlds: tasty rhubarb and honey, without risking spoilage. I know honey doesn't spoil, but I agree adding rhubarb will change that.

I'll be trying it this weekend. Thanks for the good ideas!

author
pumpkinseed456 (author)mnmama2014-06-16

I cook and freeze rhubarb (without honey) so I have it avail year round. I just put a small amount of water in the pan so it doesn't burn before softening and releasing its liquid.

I put it in plastic bags when it is cool then freeze flat so it doesn't take up much room.

author
Josehf Murchison (author)mnmama2014-05-29

Let every one know how it goes and good luck.

author

If you use pasteurized honey you can add the honey after cooking the rhubarb just remember don't boil just simmer.

Joe

author
bondogmom (author)2014-06-08

When I was a child, I would tear off a strip off of the raw rhubarb too, but I used salt.
You will have to post the tarts.
My rhubarb patch is over 55 years old, but much smaller now.
I'm happy to see a man cooking. My dad did too. He thought one needed to be able to do anything, regardless of their gender.
Bon

author
bondogmom (author)2014-06-08

Thank you for this Rhubarb recipe.....! When you add the Jello does it change the consistency of the jam? Do you use the whole package?

author

I use the whole package.

It will change the consistency a little by making the jam just a touch thicker, you would not notice it if you didn't look for it.

It does add a very nice strawberry flavor.

Joe

author

Thanks, I may try putting a little of the Jello in. I do like the flavor of Rhubarb and don't want to hide it.
Bon

author

My youngest son likes to eat the stalks raw peeled with a sprinkle of sugar.

I made some Rhubarb Butter Tarts today.

They were so good between my wife and two sons the 24 3 inch tarts didn't last 6 hours.

Next I'm making muffins.

Joe

author
bricobart (author)2014-05-27

Very nice project, I admire your efforts to put rubarb in the spotlights because it's one of the most underestimated and grateful plants. Just one remark: when you're heating honey you're losing all the benefits of it, killing enzyms & that stuff. All you got at the end is flavoured sugar, nothing more. Exit the benefiting effects - that's why it's also a bad idea to add honey to hot milk in the hope to get better...

Wouldn't it be better to add the honey when the temperature of the rubarb part is below 60°C? Just a thought...

author

Pasteurized honey is heated to 160˚ pasteurizing honey is a different thing than pasteurizing dairy products. One of the few things that can live in honey is yeast, all nectar the source for all honey contains osmophilic yeasts, which can reproduce in higher-moisture content honey and cause fermentation. Although fermented honey does not necessarily pose any health risk the rhubarb can encourage it by adding moisture, so you need to pasteurize the rhubarb and honey to kill any latent yeast cells that might be present and to remove any chance of fermentation.

Joe

author

Every beekeeper will warn you not to heat honey higher than 40°C (104°F) because after that you're breaking down all the enzyms. It will look like honey, it will taste like honey, but it won't be honey anymore.

author

104 f the perfect temperature to activate yeast, you want to kill it not promote its production.

author

Which makes the circle round. Making jam with honey = sacrifying the honey.

author

You are not on the same planet.

I am making Rhubarb & Honey Jam.

I am not making Rhubarb Mead or pasteurized honey.

I am making Jam with a natural sweetener, called honey.

To make Mead heat honey and water to between 100˚ and 110˚ f.

To make pasteurized honey heat honey to 160˚ f.

To make Jam just don’t boil over it really stinks when it burns.

author

Perhaps they are thinking you're requiring them to use all of their honey in this way. There can not be any variations in how you enjoy honey. You have to pick a way and stick with it. :)

My rhubarb patch isn't nearly as large as yours. But it is way more than one person can use. I'm going to try making this as it will let me share more of it with others.

I use a smaller amount of honey and cook the rhubarb with it for a sauce in a dish like strawberry shortcake. Very tasty and looks fancy without much effort. I'm also told it is good on ice cream.

author

It is good on Ice cream.

I have been cooking with honey for 40 years since when in high school I was playing cookie monster in the cafitera and the vice princible made me take health food cooking as a diciplanary action so I ended up giving away cookies instead of steeling them.

Joe

author
mnmama (author)Josehf Murchison2014-05-27

I'm thinking that as long as you keep it in the fridge and eat it within a shortish time, or freeze it instead of canning, you could add the honey after the rhubarb cools a bit and keep the micronutrients intact. You're just pasturizing it to keep the canned stock safe, right?

author
Josehf Murchison (author)mnmama2014-05-28

I have tried this no cook freezer jam with straw berries it was Ok.

I don’t know how well it will work with rhubarb because rhubarb is hard when raw.

http://www.clubhouse.ca/en/products/detail.aspx?No_Cook_Freezer_Jam_gelling_powder&id=c3fab820-1ef0-45b1-b264-e19918e8eeff

Joe

author
Josehf Murchison (author)mnmama2014-05-27

Yes I am pasteurizing it to keep the canned stalk safe.

The honey I got was from a local producer And I was not sure of the pasteurization.

If you are sure of the pasteurization you can let the rhubarb cool add the honey and freeze or refridgerate.

author
csauskojus (author)2014-05-27

Made some today! Loved how easy it was and I'm looking forward to enjoying some of it. Thank you!

author

Glad you like it

Joe

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Bio: I am a photographer, a tinker, an electronics technology engineer, and author; I write short stories and poetry for the love of writing. I started ... More »
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