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This is a ceramic egg, encrusted in old watch parts. Basically a no-cost project. The egg was $1.50.

I did watch repair a few years ago, and I kept storing away broken watches and saying I was going to do something with them. So here we are! I've at least used the innards. It's a start. :D

This is not a very traditional Faberge egg, but traditional isn't my style.

There are additional finished project pictures at the end if you'd just like to skip to that. :D

Step 1: Ingredients!

I bought a cute little unglazed ceramic egg at Hobby Lobby.

I used about 15 watches for this egg. Everything from Timex to Orion to Seiko! I had already opened these watches ages ago, so I didn't have to worry about that.

It's important to note that watch innards do not look the way most people expect. You're going to find tons of plastic, thin metal sheets and very few gears. And the gears you find will be very small.

I sorted out all the plastic bits and gears. I didn't like the way they looked. :P

I used jewelry making pliers to rip the watches apart and shape the pieces, and E-6000 adhesive to stick the pieces to the eggs. I also used a Rustoleum clear spray paint to coat the outside when done.

Step 2: Taking Apart the Innards.

You'll normally find the innards of the watch with the stem and watch face still attached. I pulled the stems out with pliers.

I then pried the innards from the watch face. This will release the hands of the watch, and will result in you having nice flat piece of metal to bend and place on the egg.

The faces of the watches cover most of the surface area of the egg.

After and face and plastic are separated, you'll want to start getting the metal out of the plastic. You can smash it, pry it, cut it, etc. No need to be delicate. It's not like these pieces will ever be functional again. ;)

Step 3: Bending the Faces.

I used round nose pliers to bend the watch faces. I didn't worry about being exact. If the metal doesn't fit the curve of the egg exactly, it'll be okay. :)

Step 4: Glue Glue Glue Glue Glue!

This was a three night process. I first glued all the faces down and the let the glue cure.

Then I started filling in the empty areas with the innards - circuit boards, bits of metal, etc. I filled in about half of the egg the second night. The third night I finished filling in.

I didn't worry about the neatness of the glue since I knew it would dry clear. I'd just put a drop on the egg and press the piece into it.

I ended up using a watch stem as a helping hand - because it was long and very skinny, I could maneuver the piece in the glue glob to where I needed it to be.

Step 5: Clear Coat!

For this I went out back and found an empty Gatorade bottle that had been used as an ashtray last Sunday during Bad Movie Night.

I set the egg in the mouth of the bottle and sprayed it down. Then I went inside and played some LittleBigPlanet. After about fifteen minutes, I went back out, flipped the egg, and sprayed again.

This continued with different inside activities until I liked the way the egg looked.

And then I threw the bottle away. Eww.

Step 6: The Base.

I used some coiled up wire to form a base. I considered using a thimble, but after realizing that was a really awful late night idea I moved on with my brainstorming.

I made the base big enough so that it can hold the egg any way that I see fit. :D

Step 7: Glamour Shot Time!

The problem with this egg is that it's almost too shiny to get good pictures of. The clear coat + glue + metal = a shininess that does not play well with my camera.

So I sat outside for a while and put the egg on various surfaces and squinted at it while the neighbors and their dogs stared at me.

Turns out the sidewalk is an excellent place to take pictures of a shiny egg. Imagine it's the future, and all of Earth is a desert, and Robo-Egg is your ruler! Yes!
I was just thinking....it might be easier to attach the odd pin or tack or screw to a wooden egg, and they aren't very expensive either.
I can just imagine a robot chicken laying the egg and a little robot chick hatching and beeping...
Kinda like a Mad-Max-ish type of head or C3PO after he rolled out of the trash compactor...
I was just taking apart watches tonight for one of my instructables :P I like this egg, it's cool looking and shiny. Shiny is always good :D
I, too, was going to take watches apart! (you're starting to creep me out). But for a different reason. I'm thinking about going steampunk (we're talking old pocketwatches).
That's just creepy. I was going to use the gears in the watches for an instructable for a steampunk -ish keychain actually.... O_o
... ... ... :?
... :? is right.
Good luck finding gears, guys. :P You'll need some pretty old watches for that, and they need to be really big. Old clocks would probably work better. :)
I found some really tiny gears and they were the perfect size for what I was doing. :D
Nice. I love it.
HAHHAHAAHAHAHHAHA no.
Too late, you already took it.
:-0 MEAN!
Well, now I don't feel so bad about my egg..... J / K !!!! Interesting compilation.
Hahaha! Awww, my poor egg. I think it's cute. :P
Well, I did comment elsewhere that I thought it was definitely better looking then mine :-)
I was wondering when we'd see one like this. :) Not very pretty but a good effort!
ohh.. You have a bunch of really fine wire...
That is really cool! <br/><br/>5 stars! <sup>for reusing electronics! :-)</sup><br/>
if this had working parts(whether its functional or not) would have made the egg work umm art wise
I wouldn't try to go through Airport Security with that in your bag.

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Bio: part of the Instructables Design Studio by day, stitch witch by night. follow me on instagram @makingjiggy to see what i'm working on! ^_^
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