"Romaurie-Effect": Inverted Aquarium in Shallow Base Aquarium.

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Introduction: "Romaurie-Effect": Inverted Aquarium in Shallow Base Aquarium.

This details the design and set-up of a vacuum-filled aquarium.

Step 1: Draw a Plan of the Aquaria With Dimensions for the Glazier to Follow.

I've chosen a relatively simple inverted aquarium that sits in a shallow base aquarium as opposed to the "tunnel" that links 2 aquariums with a vacuum-filled "water-bridge".
I've enclosed drawings that you can either have a glazier construct or cut and you assemble.

Step 2: Setting-up the Finished Aquariums.

The various processes leading up to this are thoroughly documented on "youTube".If after those details of how to build your own vacuum pump you don't feel happy to make the vacuum yourself, "tap-up" your friendly neighbourhood refrigeration engineer to make it for you.
The valve assembly on the top is a garden-hose adaptor with a refrigeration schreider valve screwed into it.It is also possible to feed a semi-rigid plastic tube to the top of the upper aquarium and vacuum through this. When the water reaches the top, shut-off the vacuum-pump and remove the tube. The water will remain in the upper tank as lon as the lower tan level covers the entrance to the upper tank.

Step 3: Schrieder-valve + Garden Hose Connector Details.

A video clip showing the construction of the valve assembly to pull the vacuum.
Also shows "leak-testing" the upper aquarium.If there is a leak, air comes in [note the air bubbles in the corner] this can be marked, water emptied, dried and re-sealed.

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Hello, and welcome to the Instructables community! It's great that you've decided to tell the world about something you've made by publishing an Instructable. We just wanted to let you know that your project still needs a little more work if you want it to be well received on Instructables. Projects that don't include certain basic elements tend not to get the attention that they deserve, and so we'd love for you to check out the list below of what makes a successful Instructable. Successful projects on Instructables include: - clearly written details of a finished project with instruction - as many steps as are necessary to explain your project - clear images that you took of your project for most, if not all of your steps - an intro image - proper spelling and grammar - appropriate cautions or safety considerations I'll give you another opportunity to make any final changes to your project before we publish it. Once you're all set to go, please republish your project and send me a quick comment letting me know that you've made some changes. I'll give it a quick final check to make sure you're on the right path, and then remove this note. Thanks for your submission and we hope to see your project published soon!

This is the final "draft" for publication.

It looks to me like you have reduced the surface area available to oxygen exchange. If this is the case the aquarium would probably support fewer fish optimally.

This was posted many, many moons ago!All current R&D is shown on my YouTube channel.I have been drilling holes in the inverted aquariums along the waterline.The home-made vacuum pump is controlled by a re-cycled refrigeration microprocessor that runs the vacuum pump for 1 minute every hour.This draws air in from outside.When the vacuum stops the water level re-covers the inlet holes to maintain the level.
I was originally trying to keep the whole process simple so any one could try the idea.But, as refrigeration engineering and the application of vacuum pumps has been part of my work for the last 37 years the application of vacuum process's is second nature.Something like "Nano aquariums" where by the application of advanced filtration and sophisticated lighting a small aquarium can house a fair sized fish community.The mini truncated aquarium effectively doubles the water volume while occupying the same outside dimensions for the base.
If I can post a link to the video here it should be clear.

http://youtu.be/2SzIkVYieXc

I understand. The video made it much more clear. It does make for a very visually interesting aquarium. Its been many years since I have had my aquariums up and running. I hope one day to get at least one of them going again. My "hacks" of the systems were a great deal less ambitious. One simple one I tried that seemed to have success was placing an external filter on the side rather than the back. My reason for this was the idea that placed on the back the water flows into the tank where it soon collides with the front glass thus creating an unnatural (to the fish) turbulence. By placing the external filter at one end the water enters the tank and flows to the opposite side creating a current. I noticed soon after that many of the fish would position themselves in the most forceful part of the current. I assumed they benefitted in some manner from this.

this is incredible. i am so making one

If there are any points not clear, let me know.Many of the processes are detailed on "youTube", The Romaurie Effect. Laurie

actually i read a little deeper into it and would prefer not to have to use a valve. so i decided to just make a smaller one and submerge it in a bucket or bathtub until it was full then pull it out so that it has a more natural vacuum effect. however, i really did like the concept and may consider doing this the correct way in the future. also it would really help if you posted all the videos, or at-least the links here to this page.

There is another mehod to Vacuum" the water out.Actually I got the idea from Instructables from a guy who was looking after his parents house and had to remove water from a basement.He attatched a vacuum cleaner to a large drink dispenser bottle so the water is vacuumed into the bottle and not the "hoover". What you do for the inverted aquarium is reduce the plastic tube diameter to about 3/8 inch, feed it to the top of the inverted aquarium and switch on.As the air is pulled out water flows in from the lower aquarium.When full, remove the tube and as long as the entrance to the inverted aquarium doesn't fall, the water stays in.A small submersible pump can be used to direct a water flow from the lower aquarium to the upper one. The system I have detailed on youtube uses a vacuum pump controlled by a process timer to give a 2 minute vacuum every hour.This pulls air in thru 3 small holes just below thw waterline.As the water level climbs the upper tank, the holes are exposed to the air which is drawn in. Elementary Bat Logic!

about how long does it take until you need to vacuum it out again