Instructables
Picture of Rope Swing with Disk Seat
This Instructable shows the steps I took to make a durable disk seat for the bottom of a rope swing for my family to enjoy.  I looked online for existing seats to purchase, however, the only ones available had a weight limit of 150 lbs.  I happen to be a little over 200 lbs. (I'm working on it), and wanted to enjoy it as well.  I also felt that I could make one rather cheaply as most of the materials I already had in my man cave. I thought about different methods for a while, and settled on these steps.  I installed it  on Easter day, 2013. I'll keep this instructable updated with any issues that may arise (hopefully none...crossing my fingers) as well as any adaptations.
    This project could possibly be finished in a long weekend.  The time-consuming tasks would be waiting for the wood glue and the different coats of Urethane to dry.
    My main concern for this instructable is that it would hold up to the weather.  I had concerns regarding water infiltration and keeping it waterproof. I believe the following steps provide great weather resistance...
 
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Step 1: Materials & Tools

MATERIALS & Tools:
3/4" Plywood
Compass with Pencil
Exterior-Grade Wood Glue
Exterior-Grade Urethane
Turpentine
Mixing Cup
1" Chip Brush
1/2" PVC Coupling
x4 1" Wood Screws
3/8" Hardwood Button Plugs
Sanding Block with Rough-Grit Sandpaper
   (I like to take a 2x4 scrap and glue the Sandpaper to it)
Medium-Fine Sanding Sponge
Jig Saw with wood blades
Rotary Tool (Dremel) with small Drum Sander attachment
Drill/Driver
3/32" Drill Bit
3/8" Drill Bit
Hand Saw
Clamps
J-B Weld 2-Piece Cold Weld Epoxy
Applicator/Stir Sticks (I prefer Popsicle sticks)
5/8" Solid Braided Poly Rope
Duct Tape (duh)
Double Swivel Round Eye - with one opening end
rimar20001 year ago
Maybe you could enhance the safety of the swing attaching a ring of foam around the edge of the seat. Here you can see that I am saying: http://www.webayunate.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/10416-e1304559654188.jpg
spratjack70118 (author)  rimar20001 year ago
Do you mean the safety of the swing hitting someone when it is not being ridden? I could understand it being of help in that capacity as my 5yr old nephew had the seat hit him when he got off one day. I could see that the foam would easily tear & wear away as people are constantly getting on & off...sometimes jumping off at that. If there was a way to make it more of an integral part of the construction in the first place... perhaps if the whole thing was wrapped in Duct Tape? Hmmm.
Im wondering if a automotive water hose slit lengthwise would work out better. Say a 1" hose slit and you could screw it around on the top and bottom, the rubber will counter sink the screws and not cut anyone. I call those suicide swings. Have a friend 2 doors down that had one and his grandson broke his arm when he hit the tree
Yes, I refer to THAT safety. Yes, you are right, the foam should be very well attached in order to remain in place.

Since some years, the swing seats in public parks are all made in rubber, precisely to avoid broken neck children.
rachl0091 year ago
I think the double swivel piece is a good idea- my sister and I had this type of swing when we were little. We would spin each other, the rope would loosen, and our hair would sometimes get caught in it when it spun back the other way!
sunshiine1 year ago
What a great idea! I love the design! It looks pretty snazzy as yard decor also! Thanks for sharing and do have a splendorous day!
sunshiine
AndyGadget1 year ago
I put a swing like this up in our garden around 12 years ago and it's still going strong. Initially for my two kids but now the next-door's younger ones are using it. you've made a lovely job of yours.

The point where the rope goes through the seat does need consideration as it's a major wear point. You've done a great job there to make it comfortable and stop the rope from fraying. I did mine slightly differently, and extended the PVC pipe about 3 foot (1 metre) up the rope to give more of a handhold and reduce the flex in the rope when the child leans back.
spratjack70118 (author)  AndyGadget1 year ago
I had considered extending the PVC, yet in the end I decided not to. Question: Does the PVC on your swing float freely, or is it somehow connected to the seat? I guess I could still add a section of PVC to try it out.
I flared it out underneath the seat and trapped it with a wooden disc so it acts as the fray protection for the rope. Initially it floated freely but it was easy to trap a bit of thigh between it and the seat - Ouch!
Oooh, we used to have this type of swing in our yard when I was little! I just love swinging! Very nicely done :)
Thank you very much. My kids have swung on it every day since I put it up on Easter morning.