Rubber Mallet Using Hot Glue





Introduction: Rubber Mallet Using Hot Glue

Hi everyone! today i am going to show you how to make a rubber mallet. A rubber mallet is a hammer with rubber head used to deliver less impact than a steel hammer. We will be making one in our kitchen in less than a hour. Lets begin!!

UPDATE : Do comment , like and vote , I will select 3 random comments and send them a instructables patch. Who knows , this time you may be the winner of the patch. Winners will be declared in the comments. best luck!

Congratulations to 1)DTOM_Bear
2) gravityisweak

3) AngryRedhead

The randomly chosen winners of the DIY Patches.

Step 1: Gather the Materials

We will use following materials to make the head of the mallet.
1) 4-5 sticks of hot glue
2) A nonstick pan ---- or something to melt the glue sticks
3) Another pot full of water. -- Colder water is better
4) Cylendrical shaped empty Ice cream cup---- prefer the flat base one
5) scissors and basic tools

Step 2: Chop the Glue Sticks.

Take the Ice cream cup and fill the chopped glue stick pieces into the cup. once the cup is full , add it to the pan for melting and cut another half cup of sticks because the air gaps between the sticks will give us false measurement. This way we are adding one+half cup of chopped sticks. The cup here is ice cream cup so the volume will vary from cup to cup according to size of the cup you chose.

Step 3: Melt the Glue and Add Colour

Heat the glue sticks till they melt completely and then add one - two spoons of colour which you like. I chose red. Add colour according to the volume of molten glue , in my case i added spoons approx. Steer it till it mixes well. Dont be worried of the bubbles arising after adding colour , they are due to the water in the ink and will cook away. I recommend the use of exhaust fan while melting because the fumes may be toxic and you dont want to breathe them in!

Step 4: Tilt the Pan to Gather the Glue on One Side.

Hot glue has tendency to solidify quickly so you dont want to waste time gathering the glue to a side after swithing off the stove. Tilting the pan while heating will help conserve time and will definately help to save glue.

Step 5: Pour It Into the Cup

Carefully pour the glue into the cup we chose and not wasting much time, place the cup in cold water beaker. This will prevent the cup from deshaping due to heat.

IMPORTANT: The glue is extremely hot and if it gets on your body you may get severe burns. Be careful with what you are doing.

Step 6: Let It Solidify

Be patient , sit back and let the glue solidify.

Step 7: Break the Plastic Cup

Rip off the plastic cup . The result is a rubber mallet head which now needs a handle.

Step 8: Install the Handle

Just shape the head using a cutter and install the handle . For the handle first make the end a bit pointed using a chisel and then hammer it into the head. And.......... you are done.....

Step 9: You Are Done !!

We have just created a rubber mallet in no time. Thanks for reading this instructable , if you like this perhaps you like some of my others. check them out ! Merry Christmas.

Comments and suggestions are appreciated. Do like and vote for this i'ble. Thanks again.

2 People Made This Project!


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Interesting. I agree with "gravityisweak" that molding the handle into the head would be stronger (file grooves into the handle to give the plastic something to flow around for a stronger bond). Another option might be to bore a hole all the way through the head, insert the handle, then drive a wedge into the head-end of the handle (look at a commercial hammer to see what I mean).

I also wonder about the durability of the head itself. What sort of projects do you use this for? I do some light metal work, and suspect the head would wear quickly. You might try "coloring" with fine carbon powder (finely ground charcoal, like you'd use to make india ink). Carbon is used in rubber to improve durability; it might work with this plastic.

That is a good idea too. Taking it another step further, what about laying down a piece of harder rubber on the bottom of the mold before you pour? That way the final mallet would have a more durable rubber making contact with whatever you are hitting.

A good idea. Could it not be accomplished after the casting process by gluing a suitably shaped hard rubber piece to the strike face of the new mallet head? If you have access to hard rubber- why not make the entire mallet head out of it? If you live in N.America you have ready access to suitable rubber of high quality and low price: Hockey pucks! Don't glue them together to form the mallet head, bolt them together with washers and lock nuts-ensuring the bolt is properly sized to permit both ends of the bolt to be recessed into, and not interfere with, the strike face. I wouldn't suggest melting real rubber in an attempt to cast it. I predict it would decompose or "de-vulcanize" rather than liquify into any substance that could be reused and cast into the form of a mallet head.

There you go! You have the beginnings of your own instructable right there!

very clever idea, I should give it a try! have a good day!

Adding sulphur with hot glue will give good strength to the mallet.

hey that was nice, but will it last, what I mean is it tough enough.

Thanks as I was thinking about it.

Those that are concerned about the head flying off could always use some E6000 glue, let sit 24 hours and it's just not coming off. Also, to those who say that this head is too soft, "You all must not do any jewelry work with silver and other metals". This would be perfect for that application, to be used in conjunction with some smaller heads. In jewelry making, all sorts of hammers are used, and to purchase them is monetarily prohibitive for most jewelry hobbyists! Good Going for this creative idea!