Introduction: Rustic Sofa Table

Picture of Rustic Sofa Table

Built this Rustic Sofa Table with two shelves. This was supposed to be a Christmas gift for my wife, until she found it in the garage under a tarp. So... she got it a few weeks early.

I used the following materials for this build:

  • (3) 2 x 4 x 10
  • (3) 2 x 6 x 8
  • (4) 2 x 2 x 8 (if your hardware store doesn't have these you can replace with a 2 x 3 x 8)
  • (2) 1 x 8 x 8
  • Table Saw
  • Miter Saw
  • Fast Square
  • Kreg Jig and Bit
  • 2 1/2" Kreg Screws
  • 2 1/2" Wood Screws
  • Screw Gun
  • Nail Gun
  • #18 x 1 1/4" brad nails
  • (2) 2" paint brushes
  • Stain ( I used Minwax Jacobean)
  • Polyurethane ( I used Minwax Clear Gloss)
  • Coffee... Lots of Coffee... ( It was cold in teh garage)

Step 1: Getting Started With the Frame

Picture of Getting Started With the Frame

I usually build tables and furniture in stages because not matter how well I plan ahead I usually have to make adjustments as I go. So, I started out with this in mind. I cut the parts to assemble the frame. I used the following parts:

  • (6) 2 x 4 @ 28 1/2" long
  • (12) 2 x 2 @ 22" long
  • (9) 2 x 4 @ 12" long

Step 2: Playing With Power Tools!

Picture of Playing With Power Tools!

Next, I got out the Kreg Jig and drills . I started with drilling two holes in each end of the 2 x 2 material. I did this to all 12 pieces.

Step 3: Starting the Assembly

Picture of Starting the Assembly

Raking a the Kreg Clamp, I assembled the first 2 x 2 to be flush with the end I decided would be my top of the 2 x 4 @ 28 1/2". Then screwed into place. For the Second location I measured down 13" and clamped the next piece and screwed together. for the last piece at the bottom I used a 2 x 4 laid on edge for spacing then clamped the bottom 2 x 2 in place and screwed it in.

Next I attached the 2 x 4 to the opposite end. After this was completed I repeated the assembly of the 2 x 2 parts and the end 2 x 4 as shown in the pictures.

Repeat these steps to make 2 side frames.

( before assembly look over your parts and make sure your best sides will be facing out. This will save you a lot of extra work later on.)

Step 4: Cross Bracket Assembly

Picture of Cross Bracket Assembly

Now, take the 2 x 4 @ 12" and drill two holes in each end of all 9 pieces. Next attached them to one of of the side frames, I attached the three on top flush the rest were indexed 3/4" lower than the 2 x 2 .

Step 5: Starting to Look Like Something

Picture of Starting to Look Like Something

Next, take the other frame side you had assembled earlier and lay it on top of your assembly with the cross bars, now screw into place.

Step 6: Make Sure Its Level or at Least Level..ish

Picture of Make Sure Its Level or at Least Level..ish

I set the frame on the shop floor to make sure everything was good and level before doing anything else. Because it easier to fix that now than after you go any further.

Step 7: Ripping Down the Shelves

Picture of Ripping Down the Shelves

I had to rip down material to fit between inside my frame, I set my table saw at just under 6 and ripped my boards. I make sure to always set the height of my table saw just above the material I'm working with. Because lets be honest, accidents happen and its better to barely nick yourself than too amputate something. Please be careful.

Step 8: Cutting Shelves to Size

Picture of Cutting Shelves to Size

I thought I would show you the miter saw since I forgot to take any pictures of me cutting the 2 x 4 material. I always use a fast square when marking my cuts. It gives me a better sight line.

I measure the frame assembly and and cut my 6" wide 1 x 4 material to 54 1/2". I did the so I had had 4 even pieces.

Step 9: Bang Bang Bang

Picture of Bang Bang Bang

Next, I put the two of the 1 x 6 material i cut int the bottom shelf. They ere just a little snug but nothing a little motivation from a rubber mallet couldn't fix. Then I attached the boards with my nail gun.

Step 10: Second Shelf

Picture of Second Shelf

Second shelf didn't need any motivation but it did need to be clamped down since the material was slightly bowed. Again, I attached the boards with brad nails but this time I put a few 1" screws thought the bottom top help hold the ends down.

Step 11: Prepping for the Top

Picture of Prepping for the Top

I made sure to have the pocket holes facing up on the top so I could see where to pre-drill the holes to attached my top boards, Being bale to know where the other screws are helps keep drill bits from breaking or dulling,

Step 12: Putting the Top On

Picture of Putting the Top On

I measure the center line of the frame then marked lines on both sides to mark the outside of my center board. I screw these boards in place from underneath. They are cut at 60" long. I always clamp the boards down to help keep the from moving while I screw them to the frame.

Step 13: TaDa

Picture of TaDa

Now it finally looks like something. At this point I took a short break to take an afternoon nap and then drink some coffee. Mostly because I felt like I earned it :)

Step 14: Back to Work

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Now that I had a nap and drank some more coffee it was time to stain it. I recommend getting rubber gloves and clothes/shoes that can be ruined. I always get it on something, I decided to use a nice dark stain, You will need a brush to apply it with and a sponge to wipe excess off and to rub in the stain. I took me about an house to stain the entire table. I didn't take any pictures to this process because I had stain all over my gloves at this point. As you can see the Jacobean stain produces a nice dark finish that shows off the grain in the wood.

Step 15: Go Find Something Else to Do for About 16 Hours.

It take stain about 4 to 8 hours to dry. I typically just let it sit until the next day that Way I know there is no chance I will leave a finger print or smudge in the finish,

If you are wondering what I did. I watched college football and looked on Instructables in the mean time while I waited.

Step 16: Almost Done!

Picture of Almost Done!

Time to clear coat this bad boy. I used a clear gloss coat but you can use what ever finish you prefer. I applied the stain over the entire table using a 2" paint brush. Now, let it dry for about 24 hours. Then apply a second coat. Let this sit again for another day or two to make sure the clear coat has set and hardened properly.

Thanks for looking at my Instructable. Have a great day!

Brandon Wells

Step 17: Put It to Good Use

Picture of Put It to Good Use

My wife QUICKLY decorated it.

Comments

sheripres (author)2016-12-08

That is beautiful! What a lucky woman!

Swansong (author)2016-12-05

Beautiful work!

wells1784 (author)Swansong2016-12-05

Thank You!

Shahid Khattak (author)2016-12-05

Looks interesting, will try to make it

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