Introduction: SICK BEATZ//MAD STEPZ

Picture of SICK BEATZ//MAD STEPZ

Created in 2015 by the emerging art duo Dj Dasha & MC Sanie, SICK BEATZ//MAD STEPZ is a portable interactive installation, that serves as a music production controller (MPC) pad and allows its users to produce and interact with mad music while generating sick visuals. It uses Processing and Arduino softwares to connect 4 pressure sensors to a LilyPad Arduino and a projector. This project was created to be displayed in public spaces such as staircases, so that the pressure sensors would act as steps.

Original score by Dasha Ilina and Sanie Irsay.

Original open-source code for the visuals by Jerome Herr. Modified with love and respect by Dasha Ilina and Sanie Irsay.

Step 1: STEP 1 // PRESSURE SENSORS // MATERIALS

Picture of STEP 1 // PRESSURE SENSORS // MATERIALS

SICK BEATZ//MAD STEPZ uses 4 fabric pressure sensors as the steps on the musical staircase.

//Materials needed:

LilyPad Arduino

Arduino and Processing Environments/Softwares

Neoprene fabric

Resistive fabric

Conductive thread

Conductive fabric/material

Snap buttons

Wire

Soldering iron

Foam

Cardboard/thin wood

Fabric of your choice

For each sensor, begin by cutting out 2 square pieces of neoprene and one piece of resistive fabric (25cm x 25cm each).

You will also need to cut out small pieces of conductive fabric/material.

Step 2: STEP 2 // CONDUCTIVE THREAD

Picture of STEP 2 // CONDUCTIVE THREAD

Using conductive thread, sew diagonal parallel lines throughout the surface of both neoprene fabric pieces. This allows the two fabric pieces to serve as conductive layers for the pressure sensor.

Step 3: STEP 3 // PLACE THE LAYERS

Picture of STEP 3 // PLACE THE LAYERS

Place the resistive layer of fabric between the two "conductive" neoprene layers - make sure that the diagonal lines of conductive thread on each neoprene layer are perpendicular (bisecting) to each other, as illustrated in the diagram above (this is to ensure a good connection between the two conductive layers).

Step 4: STEP 4 // SNAP BUTTONS

Picture of STEP 4 // SNAP BUTTONS

Use snap buttons and small pieces of conductive thread to connect wires to the button:

// Attach the small piece of conductive fabric to one corner of each neoprene layer, making sure that the fabric connects to the conductive thread.

// Attach a wire to each snap button

// Attach each snap button to both pieces of conductive fabric

[ for more information on the snap button method, or on other methods of hard/soft connections click here ]

Step 5: STEP 5 // TEST SENSOR

Picture of STEP 5 // TEST SENSOR

Woohoo the sensor is almost done! Now let's test if it works:

//Attach one of the wires to + on your Arduino.

//Attach the other to a 10 K resistor, then to - and to an analog pin (a).

//Test if it works by using the "Arduino input sensor change" example code in Processing, which can be found in file -> examples -> contributed libraries -> arduino (firmata) -> arduino_input_sensor_change

//If not, here it is anyway:

import processing.serial.*;

import cc.arduino.*;

Arduino arduino;

void setup() { size(400, 400);

println(Arduino.list()); arduino = new Arduino(this, Arduino.list()[1], 57600);

}

void draw() { int sensor=arduino.analogRead(3); background(sensor/4); println(sensor); }

//If the sensor is working correctly, the values in the console (at the bottom of the screen) will change when you press the pressure sensor (as shown in the screenshots above).

Step 6: STEP 6 // SEW THE SENSOR

Picture of STEP 6 // SEW THE SENSOR

If everything is working correctly, sew the three layers of fabric together.

Step 7: STEP 7 // ADD FOAM, SUPPORT AND CASE

Picture of STEP 7 // ADD FOAM, SUPPORT AND CASE

//Add foam on top of the sensor (to create more variation in pressure)

//Add cardboard or thin wood, as a layer of support at the bottom of the sensor

//Finally, use fabric/material of your choice to cover the foam, sensor and wood, to create a case for your button (make sure to make a hole in the case for the two wires to come out)

Step 8: STEP 8 // FINISHED SENSOR

Picture of STEP 8 // FINISHED SENSOR

//The final result should (could) look something like this.

//Then repeat all of the steps 3 more times to create 4 identical pressure sensors.

Step 9: STEP 9 // MAKE SICK BEATZ

Picture of STEP 9 // MAKE SICK BEATZ

//Connect the pressure sensors to the LilyPad Arduino (schematics shown above).

//Connect the LilyPad to laptop

//Upload AllInputFirmata to the LilyPad (Go to File -> Examples -> Firmata -> AllInputsFirmata)

//The SICK BEATZ//MAD STEPZ Processing code can be found on GITHUB. Add the .wav files from the Data folder to the sketch, if you wish to use our sick tracks (or upload your own sounds).

Step 10: STEP 10 // MAKE SICK BEATS!

Comments

DIY Hacks and How Tos (author)2015-12-14

Hi and welcome!

We're glad you want to share something with the Instructables community! However, this appears to be incomplete and perhaps missing some important information, so we have temporarily unpublished it for you. If you would like to make some changes or additions to this, please do so. Then if you would leave me a message here, we can take second look and publish this live if it is ready.

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