A few weeks ago our friend Reg asked me to make him a table to replace the damaged middle seat of a corner suite he has.

The brief was fairly straightforward, it had to measure 24" x 30" and be 20" high, materials or finish were not important as it was going to be painted white; all he really wanted was something to put a lamp & his laptop on.

Anyone who has seen my previous 'ible about furniture I have built will know I am a great fan of recycling & salvaging so this seemed like a good opportunity to give a new lease of life to some timber I had acquired from one of the members of my local Freegle group a couple of months earlier when I was building some beds for our grandsons.
One of the beds was a standard 3' single, the other was essentially a mini version custom built to fit into our bedroom alongside our bed for our two year old grandson Ryan to sleep in when he stays over, my better half Joanie calls it "his three bears bed" not too big & not too small but just right.

Some of the donor timber for these came from a set of 2' 6" bunks & I still had some of the mattress slats which were of course 30" long so it seemed fated that they should continue their working life as a table top.
These along with a few other left overs from the bunks as well as the remains of the legs became the core of Reg's new table.

As I said Reg's brief was quite straightforward, however as I was sketching out ideas in my head that evening I I decided to add a couple of things to it.

The first was to make this table for nothing or as close to nothing as I could, This meant sticking to a few rules.
1. I was as far as was practical only going to use things that I already had in the workshop.
2. As far as possible I would only use materials that were either salvaged or in some way recycled.
3. In the event that I didn't have the right materials to hand I would limit spending to a maximum of £5.00.

The second addition to his brief was really more about the tables intended position & use than anything else & will become clear later on.

Step 1: Table top.

The first job was to construct the table top, I know some people would start with the frame but I had something a bit "different" in mind for this table so the frame was going to be built to fit the top.
This was simply a case of attaching the slats to two battens that suitably enough had previously been slat support rails on one of the bunks, the slats already had screw holes so I used them partly because it saved having to fill them later & partly because having the battens right at the edge of the table top suited my plans.
Once this was done I fixed another slat using a couple of salvaged brass door hinges, the reason for the hinges will become clear later on.
Nice job on this. Hopefully can see some more projects like this from you in the future.
Thanks, I have a few more but don't always have time to document them so I tend to include them in photo 'ibles like <a href="http://www.instructables.com/id/Using-recycled-or-salvaged-timber/" rel="nofollow">this one</a> rather than step by step ones which to be honest I would prefer.<br> I have a some projects I'm going to either include in a new 'ible sometime soon or possibly add to my salvaged timber 'ible as an update.
Thanks for sharing this. We've been wanting to look into <a href="http://raymondtimberframedhomes.com" rel="nofollow">timber framed homes in Blowing Rock</a>. We also would love some great furniture to go along with it. I'll have to tell my wife about this.
dear kev <br>in this world there are very few people who take time to help people. <br>i only wanted a simple table. but you took the time to add your touch of class to the job. <br>your kindness never ceases to amaze me. <br>THANK YOU <br>kind regards <br>reg <br>p.s i knew i was not going to get just a simple table, YOU DONT DO SIMPLE <br>
Thanks mate. <br>Consider it a thank you not just from Joanie &amp; I but also from all those for whom you have gone the extra mile over the last couple of years. <br>We know that they would want to wish you well. <br> <br>And you are right, I don't do simple when better is so easy :-)

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Bio: I am dedicated to re-use, recycling & salvaging materials to make things for our home & garden, not just for financial reasons but also because I prefer ... More »
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