loading

Step 6: One of these is not like the other.

Laying inks side by side, notice the similarities...hmmm...notice the difference? You're right. The Mont Blanc has about 1/8 inch of extra plastic on the end.
I just received a G2 pen and Mont Blanc refill that I ordered on Amazon. The Mont Blanc refill is considerably shorter than the G2 ink cartridge. Not even close to working.
<p>This sounds great, but don't waste your money on the Mont Blanc refill. Buy a G2 Pro, and be done with it. The Mont Blanc ink refills are designed to be capped, and will dry out if not capped. The G2 does not have a cap. My ink dried out in less than 2 weeks, and the original G2 ink is back in, and working great. The same thing happened on 2 different pens, 2 locations. </p>
<p>I still prefer my Kaweco rollerball. It is one of those that takes international cartridges so I can refill the empty ones with whatever ink I like. This is of course down to personal preference and writing style. Some inks are more viscous than others and flow a lot more. If you are a fast writer this may suit you but not if you are slow writer like myself. Mind you, ultimately I still prefer a fountain pen over everything. I've lost count of how many fountain pens I own and the ages range from new modern Chinese pens (actually rather good) to my oldest which is a Swan Mabie Todd from around 1920.</p>
By saying you &quot;still prefer&quot; your Kaweco, do you mean you've tried this 'ible, or you've tried a Mont Blanc?
I mean that I still prefer my Kaweco in the same manner as the author claims to 'Save $200 in 2 minutes and have the worlds best writing pen&quot;. No, I haven't tried the Mont Blanc and no I haven't tried this 'ible' as excellent as it is. I am quite simply happy with the Kaweco rollerball as I have the type that uses international fountain pen ink cartridges. Ultimately I much, much prefer using a fountain pen over any rollerball. I cannot physically use a ball point pen due to having chronic arthritis in every joint but in this case my hands, fingers and wrists.
<p>Just a suggestion for at least some relief from arthritis: 4 to 6 tart red cherries per day (fresh, dried, frozen, etc.) have reduced my arthritic inflammation so much that I have now once again become a contributing member of society. 2 and 1/2 years ago, my knees hurt me so badly climbing stairs that I had to support a large amount of my weight on the handrails and that was while consuming (4) 7.5mG Vicodin and (3) 800mG Ibuprofen <strong>every </strong>day. I now, after only two months, take steps two-at-a-time again without any drugs. Same deal with my hands and playing guitar.</p>
What is tart cherries and where you buy them? I appreciate it.
<p>Not sure about the tart cherries, but &quot;Black Cherry Concentrate&quot; is available at most health food stores in the U.S. It's a bottle of thick, sweet, and very sour syrup made from Black Cherries. I like the taste straight out of the bottle, but it's REALLY sour, so you might want to mix it with some water or something. It has long been used for <strong><em>rheumatoid arthritis</em></strong> (it does no good for the other kinds), because it contains &quot;anthocyanins&quot;, which break down the sharp crystals that collect in the joints (that is what causes pain and joint damage for people with rheumatoid arthritis). I thought it sounded like a bunch of woo-woo nonsense, until I tried it for an attack of gout in my left foot. One big swallow (WOW that stuff is sour!), and within 20 minutes the pain started going away. The pain was completely gone in about an hour and a half, and the swelling was gone the next day. I've heard apple cider vinegar is good, too, but I've never tried it.</p>
Thank you very much for the info. I got a bottle today.
<p>Cheers Lee I love cherries so I will certainly try this. At the moment I am finding a lot of relief (the burning sensation has gone from my knees and hip joints) from using turmeric paste. Look up golden paste and turmeric on your favourite search engine. It is quite amazing stuff :)</p>
<p>This write up is excellent! Can't wait to try w pretentious brand toting mod (of course done with child labor) Thanks for the pro tips. </p>
<p>Cool! Nicely done.</p>
<p>I am a Southpaw (a lefty) and my hand drags across and smears everything as I write . . . NOT SO with Mont Blanc ink! I bought two Pilot Pens since there were two refills in the Mont Blanc refill package. I bought a Pilot G2 Pro with a clickable top and another Pilot Metropolitan Rollerball which has a cap and not a click pen. The Mont Blanc refills worked beautifully in both pens after I lopped off the 1/8 inch with a serrated bread knife. I now own TWO Mont Blanc pens and I love them both . . . beautiful ink, and no smearing lefties!! Best hack I have come across to date. </p>
<p>I got to thank you.</p><p>I just did this and man, the ink is awesome.</p>
Nice very nice
<p>I liked G2s for the feel of the grip, not necessarily the way they feel while writing. Then I discovered that gel pens don't write well, or at all sometimes, on waxy paper such as receipts. So now I use Papermate Profile.</p>
Excellent idea..... I'm definitely doing this!
<p>Fun and funny</p>
<p>I tried the change and did NOT have to cut the refill off. It worked fine in the clear G-2 .07 pen. Thanks for sharing.</p>
<p>Bravo! I'm looking forward to trying this one. The humor was a definite &quot;plus&quot; and well executed too. Cheers to you and all the other common men and women of the world!</p><p>- James </p>
<p>I guess that I still need a pen for writing checks but the three or four I write a month can be done with a Bic, everything else is done on a keyboard I bought used for less than the refills. That aside if the ink is of archival quality the pen hack makes sense since the cartridge is the pen and the best barrell is the one that fits your hand. I understand those who enjoy putting their thoughts to paper for I still much prefer books to monitor displays. </p>
<p>I suppose you could use the G2 ink first.</p>
<p>An excellent idea and project, but do people still write? I have two coffee cups full of unused fountain and ballpoint pens. We need a project that shows us what to do with these dried out pens. Writing by hand is a lost art. Even my own handwriting is barely recognizable - lack of practice. My last effort was the signing of a check, but that is a thing of the past now.</p>
<p>Many years ago I would switch out the ink in my nice clicker pen with Parker inserts. Until I found the G2 which I used for about 10 years. A couple of years ago I found:</p>Pentel EnerGel Deluxe RTX Retractable Liquid Gel Pen, 0.7mm, Needle Tip<p>These are the finest gel pens made, I will not write with anything else.</p>
<p>nicely done. ;) </p>
<p>The pilot pen is called like that because it can write upside down.</p><p>Astronaut pen would be a better name ....because it can write in space .</p><p>It does not need &quot;gravity&quot; to make the ink come out of the pen .</p><p>Pilot pen refills are pressurized ,that's why the ink will come out even if you write </p><p>on your ceiling ,all other pen's will stop writing .</p><p>Are Mont Blanc pens also pressurized?</p>
<p>Just paint your writing finger black..that's what mine looks like after I use my Mont Blanc Meisterstuck fountain pen</p>
This works well... for about a month! Then the Mont Blanc refill will dry out and simply quit writing. Most rollerball pens (the Mont Blancs included) need to be capped when not in use to prevent the ink from drying out. Don't waste your time or money doing this (like I did!) That said, the Pilot G2's are pretty good pens on their own, so it wasn't a total waste.
<p>jimdkc is correct that the Mont Blanc refill will dry out in a Pilot G2 body. However, my experience is that it takes about 6 months (rather than one month). My solution was to use a Pilot Metropolitan rollerball (rather than a G2). The Metropolitan is a &quot;capped&quot; pen. It's a bit less convenient to remove the cap before writing (rather than simply clicking), but the refill is not exposed to air except when you are writing and lasts several times longer. </p>
<p>A month was my best case (maybe 6 weeks, tops!)... Some quit working in as little as one or two weeks. YMMV!</p>
<p>I've done several of these and a 6 month lifetime seemed to be pretty consistent...whether used regularly or mostly sitting unused. I wonder why we had such different results. It could be the way we modified the Mont Blanc refill: I used a grinder and just removed a small amount of plastic from the end plug. If you cut it, instead, maybe it distorts the end plug and allows air inside?</p>
<p>I really don't think I damaged the seal on these. I wonder, however, how long high-end refills hang out at a big-box office supply store. They may have been quite old!</p>
<p>I may try again with a Pilot Metropolitan Rollerball body... those are pretty nice-looking pens!</p>
A hack you can add is to refill the refill. Remove the end plastic and slowly drip in liquid ink and it will work many many times. I have a Montblanc pen and couldn't find refills until I saw a hack on YouTube. Works great.
<p>There are mMany Mont Blanc pens that are capless and instead are twist to open. If this is an issue, I would recommend getting a refill meant for those pens. I find it difficult to believe that company which makes &quot;writing instruments&quot; wouldn't be able to produce a rollerball refill that does not dry up while a company such as pilot does so with ease. I have never had a Mont Blanc rollerball refill dry out on me. Although, many people (myself included) tend to use up the ink in their pen fast enough that it wouldn't have time to dry out. Everyone uses a pen differently, though.</p>
Here's a possible solution that I'm going to try: Schmidt Capless Rollerball Refills... they come in short (3 - 7/8&quot;) and long (4 - 1/4&quot;) versions. It looks like the long version should work. Fine point, 0.6 mm ceramic ball, stainless steel tip, come in black, blue, red or green, made in Germany. Should be pretty similar to the Mont Blanc... except they won't dry out!
No go... The Schmidt refills are too large in diameter to fit most G2 pens (standard G2 and G2 Limited), and on the G2's where they're not too fat (G2 Pro), they have a slightly different tip configuration.
<p>Schmidt model 888 refills (also sold under the &quot;Private Reserve&quot; name) fit and work in a G-2 pen perfectly (the ones I tried before that didn't work were Schmidt model 8126 Short). The Schmidt refills are intended for many rollerball pens, including capless models. You can get them for around $2-3 each on Amazon or eBay. They come in a wide variety of ink colors and come in fine (0.6mm) and medium (0.7mm) tips. There you go... a smooth writing ceramic rollerball pen with a German-engineered cartridge in a readily-available, inexpensive Pilot G2 body for about $5.00 that WON'T dry out in a couple weeks. And, I think they write every bit as good as a Mont Blanc!</p>
<p>my solution, since I noticed after I cut off the plastic that air would dry it out and I don't have $12 to lose is, I place a tiny piece of rubber in it. That's it. Being no one is going to see the inside anyway you could also do what my buddy did and use a Vaseline covered cotton ball. It works,it really works.</p>
<p>I got stuck at step 9 - I will contact you one out of the penetentionary...</p>
<p>When I worked as a deputy sheriff, almost every deputy in the department got a Cross pen and pencil set for uniform bling. We each also had a box of a dozen Bic stick pens and kept one clipped to our board for writing reports and citations. You would be surprised at the number of people who will sign a citation and keep your pen. That is why the Cross set stayed in the shirt pocket. We weren't fools. :)</p>
<p>It looks like I'll be stuck working on step 5 for awhile. I'll post an update in 2022 or later. </p>
<p>I personally HATE gel ink. I've used a Mont Blancs and they are nice, but my all time favorite pen was a Piolt click pen (another annoyance of mine) that had wash/fade/smudge-proof ink. It was perfect for writing out prescription drugs and being as I was in an ER in a large metropolitan area, we had more than our fair share of people trying to get extra narcotics to sell...</p>
You can also buy replacement refills for the Fisher Space Pens that write very smooth, even upside down, on wet paper and extreme temperatures.
<p>the jetstream uni ball pen is really good too, i really like that pen, and it smells nice too. you can get it from the internet for a cheap cost. well, i dunno if its really cheap, but its like, the best pen in the whole wide world. so i recommend jetstream. its really good. i swear. </p>
<p>Interesting idea, but the best comment below was the one suggesting ordering a Mont Blanc clone. BTW, I usually do the opposite. With my expensive name brand pens, I'll often buy clone refills because they're (do you see it coming?) less expensive, and most of the time, work just as well. This is the first time I've seen using expensive name brand refills in cheap pens.</p>
Regardless if it works or not, I thought it was a funny instructable.
Just get a cheapo bic fountain pen from amazon and fifty ink cartridges! It never clogs, dries pretty quick, and writes really smoothly.

About This Instructable

1,678,568views

1,617favorites

License:

Bio: nothing anyone should be interested in...
More by kingant:Save $200 in 2 minutes and have the worlds best writing pen 
Add instructable to: