Introduction: Sculpture Robot (Part 8 of 9): Arduino Robotics Actuator Motor Controller

​I have been building sculpture for over ten years and I have watched the evolution of machining technology go from CNC milling to 3D desktop object printing. These ‘making machines’ have formed a physical gap between my hands and the materials I sculpt, and I see this as a problem. As a contemporary sculptor, my challenge involves utilizing the advantages of modern making-machines, yet, I want to maintain physically natural material interactions with the objects I form. Making machines tend to produce mediated experiences of sculptural production that dilute my material awareness and may even distort my ‘tacit knowledge’ [M. Polanyi]. I believe I must form a new hybrid art-making partnership between my hands and machines, in an attempt to narrow the physical gap that has formed. With this in mind, I ask the question: is it possible for artists to experience a tactile interaction with materials while fabricating objects using robotic machines?

I put together nine videos that show how it was put together - from gathering recycled materials, to fabrication and even electronics and programing demonstrations.

Find out more at: http://morganrauscher.com/morganrauscher/portfolio/

I hope you enjoy!

Comments

fixitnotbroken (author)2014-01-21

fascinating I watched all of your nine videos and found them to be interesting and well produced. I thank you for sharing your project but wan ttoi ask you to share more of yourself i felt thatr was missing form your presentation. I too work in the same mediums as you and the reason i do so is because i like to watch my hands make things my orginal inspiration to make something was to make a gift for someone i love (my sister) my creativity grew from that simple thought. Over the years I made things I orginaly created for loved ones in a mass production method to make a living by selling them. I still run on the simple reward that i get after i make something the reward of seeing it finished and remebering how much effort i put out to achieve that. I am writing this to come to one question which is 'why do you make things?' what inspires you? You are very creative and talented as well a being well learned now you have such skills how will you use them? thank you very much for sharing your project it is most enjoyable to watch. my email is handymanken@live.com

First of all let me thank you for your kind motivational words.

To answer your question, I make things because I was designed to make things in the same way that an apple tree makes fruit because it was designed to do so. I think that if we just learn to listen to the natural order it makes it easy for us to find purpose in our lives. We usually 'like' to do something or people say we are 'talented' at - or we feel we should be doing. What that usually indicates to me is that we are meant to do that thing. Of course we are dynamic creatures and we can form new ways of being and doing by learning, but at the essence I feel as though if we follow the natural order of things (easily observable and inherently felt by our inner voice) then we will lead peaceful lives with contentment and enjoyment.

I am inspired when others are inspired and so I do inspiring things when I can and try to share them as a maker, artist and professor. However, I am given all that I have and only by acknowledging this can I continue to receive such a bountiful harvest of enjoyment in manifesting things.

I think I could talk about this topic for quite a long time and I welcome this conversation on an ongoing basis.

sparrotic (author)morganrauscher2015-03-24

Stupid robot arm making me tear up, thank you, your project was cool but both of your comments are awesome.

morganrauscher (author)sparrotic2015-03-24

Thank you kindly sparrotic.