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So, you've purchased a Starcraft camper or are looking to purchase one. However, you've found one major problem: you have no idea how to set it up. In this, I will show you how to do exactly that. Carefully of course , so that you, your possessions, and your (potential) camper remain undamaged.

Step 1: Safety Warnings

1. Follow these steps exactly. Failure to do so can result in damage to the camper, damage to articles within the camper, and injury or possibly death to people within or setting up the camper.

2. Do not set the camper up in an uneven area, as they may cause the above noted issues setting up the camper.

Step 2: What You Will Need:

  • The camper itself
  • The camper's crank
  • The camper's drain pipe
  • Four wheel chocks
  • Two jack stands
  • Wooden stand
  • Wood boards of various sizes
  • Level
  • A container of some sort that can hold water. Preferably with a small opening.

Advised:

  • Other people to help you. (The process of setting up the camper goes much faster if you have multiple people. It is also much safer.)

Time to complete:

Depends on how many people are assisting you. On average, this will likely take about fifteen minutes if you do it alone.

Step 3: Initial Placement

Ensure the camper is in the desired location before going further, as moving it after this step will take a fair amount of time and effort. It is also advised that you back the camper onto two wooden boards to help with leveling later.

Step 4: Stabilizing the Camper - Part 1

Before you can actually set up, you need to set the camper down and prevent it from simply rolling away.

1. Detach electrical cable from truck.

2. Place the four wheel chocks around the wheels, two for each wheel.

Step 5: Stabilizing the Camper - Part 2

3. Place the wooden stand under front jack.

4. Crank the front jack clockwise until the post reaches the block.

Step 6: Stabilizing the Camper - Part 3

5. Release the latch on the ball joint.

6. Crank the jack further until the camper is released from truck.

7. Move truck away from camper.

Step 7: Stabilizing the Camper - Part 4

8. Adjust the height of the camper with the front jack, measuring with the level, until the camper is balanced and stable. Remember, clockwise goes up, while anti-clockwise goes down.

9. Push the handle down to lock it in place.

Step 8: Anchoring the Camper

The chocks help, but you will need more to keep the camper in place.

1. Pull down the built-in stands from under the back of the camper, adjusting them until they are firmly on the ground.

2. Crank the camper up.

3. Use the car jacks to do the same, placing them under the front part of the camper, pushed against the frame of the camper.

4. Return the camper to its level position and lock it in place.

Tip: If needed, use wooden boards to help level the stands on both sides.

Step 9: Opening the Camper

Yes, it is now time to set up the camper.

1. Undo the clasps on the four corners of the camper.

2. Insert the crank into the slot on the front rig of the camper.

3. Turn the crank anti-clockwise until the camper reaches the max height.

4. Attach the catch to the gears and the catch in the wire mechanism to keep the camper risen.

Step 10: Setting Up the Bunks

Many steps beyond this one require getting into the camper. However, the bunks take up a significant amount of that space until they are set up.

For each bunk:

1. Pull the bunk out from the camper.

2. Pull out the metal poles from under the bunk's mattress.

3. Pushing the bunk up slightly, slide the poles into the slots on the camper, thus propping up the bunk.

5. Pull the bunk's canvas out. Take note of the rope loops around the outside.

6. Attach the loops to the underside of the bunk.

7. Inside, pull the metal loop alongside the edges of the bunk up and secure it.

Step 11: Sealing Up the Camper

Presumably, you wouldn't want insects, animals, or other things to get into the camper while you eat, sleep, etc.

Go around the camper's outside and zip up the canvas. Make sure to push any inner fabric back inside, especially around the bunks.

Step 12: Setting Up the Door

While the canvas is certainly important, the door is also an easy way for vermin to get in.

1. Head inside the camper.

2. Pull down the upper half of the door from the ceiling, twisting the knobs to release it.

3. Swing it down from the ceiling and connect it to the lower half of the door, using the knobs to secure it and the velcro to fasten it.

4. Turn the catch so the door can open.

5. Place the step (included with camper) into the slot below the door.

Step 13: Setting Up the Inside: Cabinet

Like the bunks, the camper's cabinet takes up a fair amount of room.

1. Pull the camper's cabinet up from the floor.

2. Pull the leg out from underneath the cabinet and secure it.

Step 14: Setting Up the Inside: Water

Not all campsites have working water for campers. In that event, you will need to do this manually.

1. Pour water into the labelled nozzle.

2. Attach drain pipe to disposal hole and place the container under it.

Step 15: Setting Up Utilities: Sink

If you want to do such things as brush your teeth without heading to the campsite's bathroom (if there is one), you will need to set up the sink.

1. Unlatch the sink's catch.

2. Pull the sink upward in the circular motion towards the door.

3. Relatch the sink.

Step 16: Setting Up Utilities: Electricity

Attach the electrical cable to the battery on the frontal rig.

Step 17: And Now You're Done.

Good work! You've successfully set up the camper. Make sure to maintain the camper, as disrepair can make setting up and inhabiting the camper dangerous.

I just bought a 1994 starcraft 2021. I can set it up just fine but I have no idea on how the awning sets up. Can you help?
<p>My parents had that EXACT same Starcraft model when I was a kid. Lots of cross country trips with it for sure. Thanks for the memories!</p>
My folks used a pop-up camper on 4 of our 6 Al-Can (Alaska-Canada Highway) trips. If it wasn't raining, set up took 10-15 minutes. If it was raining, we found we could set up in 7 minutes. When we were making those trips to visit relatives Outside, 800-900 miles were still gravel. Traveling the country in a pop-up, is a great way to see Canada and the South 48 States is great way to travel. I have been lucky enough to have visited 42 of the South 48 States and 5 Canadian provinces.
<p>I have always wondered how these work. Thanks for sharing! </p>

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