Introduction: Shower Rack for a Claw Foot Tub

It's hard to find a shower rack that works for a claw foot tub because they generally are made to go around the shower neck. The shower neck on my claw foot is completely vertical so most racks just don't work. I had used the kind of rack that fits in the corner, but it got rusty so I decided to have a go at making my own. It turned out to be a relatively cheap and easy alternative. The cool thing about this rack is that you can add whichever shape and type of basket you want and reposition at will. 

Step 1: Supplies & Tools

Supplies:
4 yards of chain - I got coated white to match the shower and in the hopes it wouldn't rust (about $6)
2 U clamps (about $1.50 each)
4 quick links (mini carabiner) ($.89 each)
2 eye and hook turnbuckles (about $3 each)
9 feet of bendable wire (I used this to secure the back of the rack, if you find baskets that have a back, you don't need this) ($3)
And of course, baskets! I searched high and low for the perfect baskets and ended up not finding quite what I wanted for the amount I wanted to spend (under $20 total) so I ended up settling for some kitchen racks from Home Depot. They were $7 and $4. 

Tools:
Pliers
Adjustable wrench

Step 2: Secure the Back of the Rack

**If you find baskets that already have a back to them you can skip this step.

String the bendy wire around the back of the rack so that your shower things won't fall out. The wire I got was pretty stiff and stayed however I bent it, so this step was pretty easy. See photos. 

Step 3: Attach the Chain to the Curtain Rod

My shower rod forms a full rectangle and is anchored securely to the wall and ceiling. I attached the two chains to the bar that is opposite the shower head. If you wanted, you could really place it anywhere, such as in the corner. Just be sure to place the chains the same width apart as the basket/rack that will hold your shower stuff. 

Use the two U-clamps to attach each end of the chain to the curtain rod.

Step 4: Attach Chain to Tub

Now you're going to use the hooked turnbuckles to attach the chain securely to the lip of the tub. When you turn the middle part of a turnbuckle the eye loop and hook either unscrew or screw tighter at the same time. Start with the turnbuckles almost fully expanded as shown in the first photo. 

Now put the hook end of the turnbuckle underneath the lip of the tub and hold it up so that you can see where you will need to separate the chain. See second photo. Do this for both sides of the chain. My shower rod is crooked so my chains ended up being different lengths. 

Now it's time to pry open the chain links. I used pliers, an adjustable wrench, and my muscles. There are probably other ways to open chain that won't scrape off as much of the coating as my method, but it worked. See third and fourth photo. Pry open the chain just enough to slip on the eye loop of the turnbuckle. 

Slip on the expanded turnbuckle to the opened link. Now it's time to close the link back up. This is actually a little harder than opening it. I used pliers to squeeze the top and bottom of the chain together. See fifth photo. Do this on the other chain.

Put the hook under the lip of the tub and twist the middle part of the turnbuckle so that it tightens. Twist until the chain is taught, but no need to crazy. Do this for both chains. 


Step 5: Hang Up the Baskets/racks

Last step! Attach whatever basket or rack you're using to the chains using the quick links (mini carabiners) shown in the first photo. The cool thing about this set up is that you can place the basket/racks at whatever height you want. 

My little basket actually had hooks at the top so I just attached it to the bottom of the bigger rack. Shown in second photo.

And, you're done! 

Comments

author
jessyratfink (author)2012-06-17

Such a good idea. Looks great!

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