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Simple Closet Shelf Organizer from leftover faux marble & plywood

Picture of Simple Closet Shelf Organizer from leftover faux marble & plywood
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I made these at TechShop (http://www.techshop.ws) using some leftover faux marble sheet materials that were too good to throw away (Photos 1 & 2) and some hardwood plywood pieces that cried out to be put to use. (Photo 3)

I had made a few of these for our closets in the past and my wife was wondering what I was planning to do with the faux marble. So after discussing where we thought we could use a few more closet shelf organizers, I measured the spaces and shelf depths, loaded the materials into the truck and set out for TechShop, San Jose, CA. (15 minutes from our home.)
 
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Step 1:

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I laid out the materials (Photo 1-1 ), measured them carefully, compared to the closet measurements I had made, (Photo 1-2) and then made a cutting diagram/layout sketch to generate the maximum possible pieces that fit the closet conditions. (Photo 1-3)
(The reasons the photo of the cutting diagram say "Done" is that As I c ut and labeled the pieces I wrote done on the completed step.)

Step 2:

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Cut the large pieces to size. I measured carefully with the steel ruler to set the proper distance between the saw blade teeth and the rip fence on the SawStop table saw. (Photo 2-1)

Important safety note:
The table saw key was not in the switch, but out on the table in plain view so I was certain that the saw would not start accidentally.

Step 3:

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Once the measurement was confirmed by cutting a piece of scrap wood to the width measured, I proceeded to cut the large pieces of material (Photo 3-1) into the required strips, (Photo 3-2) using push sticks for safety.

Safety: Shut down the saw. Remove the key while doing the next step.

Step 4:

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The next set up was to create a stop to cut the strips I had just created to the lengths intended for each organizer.

To do this I first measured between the blade teeth and a 3/4” thick block and snugged the saw fence to the block. I then locked down the fence into that position, set the ruler aside, moved the 3/4” block to the front of the saw fence and clamped it into position. (Photo 4-1) This block provides an exact measurement for the pieces to cut and provides a safety space so that the workpiece does not bind up between the Miter Gauge and saw fence. (Photo 4-2)

Step 5:

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Clear the table for action (safety first)! Then slide the work piece alongside the miter gauge (held back from the saw blade a few inches) until it contacts the 3/4” stop. (Photo 5-1) Secure the piece in position, insert the saw key, turn on the saw and cut the piece by sliding the mite gauge along the slot. (Photo 5-2) Use a push stick to push the cut piece and falling piece away from the blade. Continue to cut each piece by sliding the remainder stock to the stop, secure in position to the miter gauge, then cut the piece and push the cut piece and remainder away with a push stick.

When all pieces are cut, stack them in groups and prepare to assemble them. (Photo 5-3)

Step 6:

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Assemble the pieces using bench dogs for stops and a squaring board to hold the pieces in position. (Photo 6-1) Use the combination, drill and driver bit (Photo 6-2) to sub-bore and chamfer the screw hole locations. Then pull the drill out of the holder, flip over and the screw bit is now in position. (Photo 6-3) Drive the screws. Proceed to the other corner and do the same for each U-shaped organizer. (Photo 6-4)

Since we started with pre-finished materials, there was no finishing that needed to be done.

Step 7:

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After arriving home, we set the organizers, spaced apart by the towel and clothing dimensions at the middle place of the shelf. The first organizer was located out from the close end wall by a towel/clothing dimension, (Photo 7-1) then the next organizer was placed a clothing article apart from that one (Photo 7-2) until we had spaced each one where we wanted them. The remaining photos show some of the results.

I hope you enjoyed reading through and making use of this TechShop Instructable.
Enjoy your new organized closets using your left over materials!