Instructables
Picture of Simple Plug and Play LED Lighting
LED lighting: the expensive choice for lighting your home or display, which only the green crowd hopes to afford, or is it?

When creating a Halloween display for my neighborhood, lighting is one of the most important aspects. If you can't see it, who cares if you spent 10 hours building it. How do you light up something, keep the yard and the kids safe from hazards, and do it cheaply enough to afford it on a home haunters budget? That is the question I asked and here is how I answered it. Simple LED lighting that is modular, plugs into boxes so it is easy to move, low voltage so it is safe, grounded to a GFCI so it is almost shock proof, and pre wired for the most part so I don't need to be an electrical engineer to make it work.

Below I will try to show you the steps you need to take to make your own LED system so you can light up your display or home for Halloween or even Christmas if you should choose.

I have to thank a few people whos ideas I collaborated off of to create this by combining elements of their designs into my own.
HauntForum members: Niblique, AllenH, and hpropman. As well, the main LED spot light design comes from Holidaycoro with a change in the RGB control over DMX, and a change in the Cat5 cable to RCA Cables.
 
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Step 1: Video of the system

Here is a quick simple video of how the components of the system work together.

bhvm11 months ago
I would love to see your night time pics with various objects,
Also i have tried the same project 5 years ago, and it did'nt turn out well. Experts say LEDS in parallel is bad idea, and they're right. I made clusters of about 15, 5mm White LEDs; and while they worked well for a month or so, soon some of them dimmed out, while others were way bright. This was a case of current imbalance indeed.
Haunted Spider (author)  bhvm11 months ago
I will work on getting some good pictures posted as an update step at the end of the instructable. It will be Mid October before I do though. I will get several night pictures and change up the color schemes when I set up my display this year.
newbeatle1 year ago
hi i have a question about the sistem. does the leds need some kind of resistor or you connect directly to the power supply ? i know that they need a resistor to avoid overcurrent, unless the same led have this built in resistor ...thanks , this is a good idea!!
Haunted Spider (author)  newbeatle1 year ago
Good question beatle,

The answer is the reason listed the LED system as simple. The prewired LEDs come from Lighthouseleds.com and are all ready to go, resistors already soldered in place for you. All you have to do is order the right voltage as they come in a few different ones. To keep my system simple, I did everything in 12 volt.

As well, the bigger LED flood lights with the LEDs from Holidaycoro, have built in resistors as well. The only soldering you need to do is to create the connections for the RCA jacks. No resistor values to worry about, No wiring in parallel or series, just simple connections.
aaaah so good that the leds you buy have built in that resistor!! and nice idea....... i like to make something like this 4 my home, using some 12 v system to light up leds to light the different rooms on it...... but i hope have time to develop that system !!

regards from mexico

eyesee1 year ago
It's not very convenient
Haunted Spider (author)  eyesee1 year ago
Out of curiosity, what isn't convenient? It replaces multiple plug ins with one type, an RCA jack and gets rid of higher voltage lines in a display. It also uses LED lighting for low energy and creates a system that can be expanded to suit your needs. I am confused by your comment. Can you elaborate?