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I have a small solar panel gathering dust, so I decided to clean some tools. Read up on electrolysis, so here it is.

The driver bits on the left are what I started with, and the ones on the left have had about 15 minutes of treatment.

Step 1: Setting Up

Positive (red) wire from the panel goes onto a bunch of old bike cables

Negative (black) wire got attached to a small copper wire from an old phone cable. The other end of copper wire went onto the piece I wanted to clean.

The plastic container is filled with water+baking soda.

Step 2: Let the Sun Shine on the Panel

depending on sun intensity, size of panel and parts involved it may take more or less time. See next step for before and after images.

Step 3: Enjoy! Before and After...

here is the results you can expect.

<p>I thought this was great. I have a small solar panel and would like to try. Can you provide more details on all aspects of this as i am a visual person</p>
Shoot away with precise questions. Solar panel has a positive (+) red and negative (-) leads. The negative has to make electrical connection to the piece you want to de-rust. The positive has to make contact with a scrap piece of metal (rod, bike cables in my case). The reaction takes place between the anode and cathode in the elecrolyte liquid. As you might know, pure (distilled) water does not conduct electricity well, so baking soda is added (I think I saw Na in the formula). Once the two pieces connected to electricity are dipped into the liquid, you will see bubbles, higher the current, more bubbles (O2 on one side, H on the other). I am guessing iron oxide gives up its oxygen as a result of electrolysis, turning rust back into iron. One of the pictures has the full setup as I had it.
Shoot away with precise questions. Solar panel has a positive (+) red and negative (-) leads. The negative has to make electrical connection to the piece you want to de-rust. The positive has to make contact with a scrap piece of metal (rod, bike cables in my case). The reaction takes place between the anode and cathode in the elecrolyte liquid. As you might know, pure (distilled) water does not conduct electricity well, so baking soda is added (I think I saw Na in the formula). Once the two pieces connected to electricity are dipped into the liquid, you will see bubbles, higher the current, more bubbles (O2 on one side, H on the other). I am guessing iron oxide gives up its oxygen as a result of electrolysis, turning rust back into iron. One of the pictures has the full setup as I had it.
<p>Wow! This is great!</p>

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