Instructables
Picture of Simple and cheap indoor TV antenna
I haven't had a cable TV for the last several years since I found my family didn't need so many (too many) channels and could watch handful of channels for free through antenna. It's called OTA (over the air) channels. You may have to give up some of your favorite channels (I personally miss the Discovery and Family channels) from the cable TV providers, but it's FREE!!  Depending on your location and orientation of the antenna, you could get several to over 30 channels.

There are commercial products both indoor and outdoor.  The outdoor antennas certainly work (much) better than indoor antennas because their elevation from the ground is high so they can catch more signals and there is no obstacles such as wall or house structures compared to the indoor antennas.

But the indoor antennas have their own benefits: 1) you don't have to climb up the roof to install and maintain it; 2) you don't have to worry about thunder or lightening; 3) it's relatively cheaper than outdoor ones because it doesn't need long cable and fixture material.

So, as long as your location is in or near urban area and you have a proper spot inside your house to put it and want to create your own antenna with various shapes and sizes, give an indoor FREE TV antenna a try!

Here is my version.

The aluminum foil in the kitchen is always handy. I needed a support to attach two pieces of aluminum foil and found a piece of cardboard box. The size of each side of the aluminum foil is 250mm x 215mm. I didn’t test other than this size but it works good enough. You may want to try different size and shape of similar design for your TV. I could get over 20 channels with this.
 
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DanM224 days ago

not sure why you cut the coax, if you bought the balun, you could have bought a splitter. The way you did it will mess with the 50 ohm impedance of the coax. Your signal would improve with the splitter.

JeonLab (author)  DanM223 days ago
Well, as of today, I have 26 channels with this antenna, so I'm satisfied and not planning any improvement at this moment. Thanks for your comment.
DanM224 days ago

would love to see an nec2 simulation of it.

rimar20002 years ago
Awesome! Congratulations.

You would redo the union in step 4, these coaxial cables require the outer mesh lead be always around the inner. As you did, the inner cable could receive interferences (athmospheric or house) in that joint.
JeonLab (author)  rimar20002 years ago
Thank you for your comment and that's exactly why I wrapped the shield cable with the foil.

size of the wire top of the cardboard? please

JeonLab (author)  ricoderick9 months ago

That's 22 gauge.

Forgive me, I did not see that.
This is nice, I also like the profile of your antenna design. Thanks for the share.
JeonLab (author)  audreyobscura2 years ago
Thanks!
AtomRat2 years ago
Great antenna, thank you very much for this simple design. I can use it in many situations if a quick one is needed that I can make out of scrap
JeonLab (author)  AtomRat2 years ago
Thanks!
Melibokus2 years ago
It es pragmatic an great. To transfer this idea with other frequencies, especially the wlan 2.4 GHz, what are the TV frequencies for this antenna ? MfG Melibokus
JeonLab (author)  Melibokus2 years ago
The channels I got are from 2 to 62. According to the TV channel frequency table from Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_American_broadcast_television_frequencies), it will be roughly 50-800MHz.