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I have a large yard but no two trees are close enough to set up a slackline. I've always thought about doing a deadman's anchor and finally decided to do it. Here is how I did it:

Step 1: Pick Your Spot and Dig Out the Grass

Cut out the grass so you can replace it later.

Step 2: Start Digging

Dig about 3 or 4 feet across and a few feet down. If you live in southwest Missouri like I do than you will not enjoy this step. There are more rocks than dirt.

Step 3: Make It a "T"

Once you've dug the initial ditch, dig another one to make a "T." The second ditch won't be as deep and will get gradually shallower as it goes.

Step 4: Drop in Your 4x4 and Line

Put your line around the 4x4 and drop it in.

Step 5: Bury the 4x4.

Bury the 4x4 and fill the hole in. Pack it down as you go. It also helps to add water to get it nice and packed in.

Step 6: Replace Your Divots

Put your grass back!

Step 7: Plan the A-Frame

I've seen a few different ways to build the A-frame. This is what I did.
2x4x44" - 2 of these for the vertical pieces

2x4x48 - 1 for the base

4x4x5 - 2 for the middle spacers

4x4x10 - 1 for support between the vertical pieces

2x4x16 - 2 for the diagonal supports. - I actually don't know how long they are. I just cut them to where they'd fit.

1/2"x7" bolts - 2 for the varied heights.

Step 8: Build That Sucker

I used a ton of 2.5" wood screws.

Step 9: Now You're Ready to Slackline

Pick your height and start tightening. You'll have to adjust the A-Frame as you tighten. I've found that if it's leaning a bit backwards it works better.

@yiucycle good question. Mine is still good. I dug it up a bit this past summer and all was well. It'll be 3 years buried this spring.
<p>how long will the webbing last being it is bury in the soil? </p>
<p>Hey, could I know what kind of wood you used, and what other kinds of wood might be suitable? I'm thinking about building my own A-frame soon.</p>
Love it! Thanks for the measurements!
<p>Thanks for the post. I just got back from the store where I bought all of the materials. So FYI for anyone giving this a shot; it cost me about $85 for all the components.</p>
<p>I made it and it works perfectly and suits my needs thanks. </p>
Awesome! Glad it worked out for you. I've been using mine for 2 years and it works as good now as it did when I first built it.
<p>I'm a little confused by your shopping list for the A-Frame. The first line, &quot;2x4x44 - 2 of these for the vertical pieces&quot; is this a frame 4 feet tall? I don't think so, which means this would make 4 2x4x22s, enough for 2 A-Frames. The same seems to go for the base cut.<br>However, the next 4 lines seem to be for only one A-Frame.</p><p>Can you please clarify?</p>
The frame is indeed that tall. If it was only 22&quot; tall the line would hit the ground when you are on it.
<p>If you're using two 2x4's side-on and one 4x4 in between doesn't that mean your bolts need to be at least 8&quot;? </p>
You could but since a 4&quot;x4&quot; is actually 3.5&quot; inches I was able to use 7 inch ones I already had.
Hey Standard.Frank, thanks for the thought. I've used t for about a year and the extra braces are not needed. When I set it up I lean it a bit toward the anchor instead of completely upright. It'll move some if your jumping but that is part of the design. As long as your line is tight it works great.
Hey man just a thought. Is it worth putting extra bracing on on 4 sides so the a frame stays more rigid and upright?
<p>Nice! Thanks for sharing!</p>

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