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Step 2: Setting Up

Although setting up a slackline is pretty simple, different lines that are sold work differently. Some use ratchets to add tension to the lines. Others rely on you pulling the line nice and tight. For this reason, I am keeping this pretty general. What is discussed on this step applies to almost all slacklines, but refer to the instructions that go with your particular slackline when setting up.

Trees work best in my opinion as anchor points for slacklines. Any sort of post in the ground will work, but I trust the root systems of most trees to support the tension and weight involved with slacklines more than a pole cemented into the ground. Find two medium size trees, big enough to hold a decent amount of weight, but small enough to easily wrap a line around. Palms, oaks, and pines generally work pretty well. It will be easier to keep your balance on shorter distances, so I'd look for two trees about 10-15 feet apart to start out. Technically, the trees can be as far apart as the slackline will reach, although there will be much more wobble in the line at longer distances.

Get some sort of tree protection before hanging the line. If you bought a slacklining kit, the included tree protection will probably be a couple of long strips of felt. Towels, cardboard, or carpet also work. The main purpose of the tree protection is to keep the tension of the slackline from damaging the tree bark. If you're slacklining in a public park, the rangers/police will appreciate this...

Experiment with different heights as well. With different lengths and tensions, the distance above the ground will vary. When you're learning, try and get the center of the line to stay about one foot off the ground when in use.
Funny that I found this instructable on my inbox lol, just made my own kit a week ago. I can walk till the end of the line (aprox. 7 or 8m, kinda short, but yeah) and sometimes make the turn and walk back.<br><br>I think I should focus on my basic balance first, like staying in place for a decent amount of time. Do you have any tips on jumping? I start to bounce on the line, but I backoff when my feet are almost leaving it, cause I have a certain fear of a nasty fall.<br><br>Thanks and great instructable!
what do you mean by &quot;made my own&quot;? i've been trying to DIY a slackline kit for ages and would appreciate any input.
I bought one of those tubular webbing used to hold truck's cargo (not sure if it's called cargo, sorry). It comes with a hook at the ending, so I cut it and sewed a loop base on pics from the internet
I bought one of those tubular webbing used to hold truck's cargo (not sure if it's called cargo, sorry). It comes with a hook at the ending, so I cut it and sewed a loop base on pics from the internet
I love that the sport is gaining some traction. The new flat webbing is so superior to previous generations. Before using a cheap come along, just be prepared to take it out of the system.....
i have been slacklining for about 2 years now on a tubeular webbing setup and some tricks i have found for jumping are shorter line, higher tension, andstarting close to one end. hope this helps.
While I don't think it's for me, I marvel at your skill. Keep up the good work!
This looks fun and would develop your core muscles. My son would probably enjoy it. I voted for it, but know that if I tried it I would end up with a broken wrist or collarbone. If you have really poor balance, I would suggest working up to this by learning to balance on one foot for at least a full minute first.
Cool!
I've tried this before!

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