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The Snarling iron tool has a mounting end which is held in a vise the other end has a chisel end.  These tools are made in a loose Z pattern.  They are used to create bumps or patterns on the outside of tubes, bowls or containers which are too narrow to use a hammer and chisel.   The mounting end is put into in a vise so that the chisel point will be facing up.  The container or other work piece is placed to be held steadfastly against the underside of the face that is to receive the bumps or patterns.  A sharp blow (wallop) is delivered to the top of the snarling iron between work piece and the vise.  The rebounding of the iron strikes the work piece creating the patterns or bumps.  Similar to repousse’; you will be striking and moving the work piece many times to create effects.   Having a variety of Snarling iron chisel patterns will help in creating different effects, but a single blunt point can go a long way.  A striking rod is used instead of a hammer so the focus is on the work piece and not the striking point on the iron.   I use different striking rods for different rebounding effects; cut off baseball bat, iron rod, pipe etc…  There is a striking sweet spot on the iron which is found thru practice. 

To see some fine work using this tool process; search for images for war trench art.

 I made it at Techshop. http://www.techshop.ws/

Step 1: Cut

Start with a piece of Plain Steel bar stock 36in in length ¼” by ¼”   (square) from local materials store.

Cut bar stock to length - 17” (yields 2 pieces) with hacksaw.

 Clean the burrs off of both ends of bar stock (from hacksaw) using either file, grinder or power sander.

Step 2: Create Chisel Pattern

 

It is easier to first create your chisel end (or pattern) while the bar is still straight.

I choose to create C curved chisel points.  Unlike normal repousse’ chisels you cannot flip the chisel around inside a container.  So for this pattern I needed two irons for working in opposite directions.

I ground a C pattern into one end (¼” by ¼”) by a using grinder, then rat tailed file and polished with emery cloth. Repeat for iron #2.

Step 3: Forming a Z Pattern

Chisel end of bar stock is marked with permanent marker 1” from end (where I created the chisel pattern). With iron #1 I needed to place the C pattern facing away from the work bench and the opposite iron #2, I marked with the C pattern facing the work bench.

Mounting End of bar stock is marked with permanent marker on the opposite side (flip it over) 4” from end (Non chisel end).

Place the chisel pattern end into a vise so that the mark is showing at the top of the jaws facing away from you.  Pull down barstock to 90 degrees which creates the 1” iron end.  Now place opposite end into the vice so that the mark is showing at the top of the jaws facing away from you. Pull down barstock to a little greater than 90 degrees which creates the 4” iron end. I found an angle greater than 90 degrees gave a better rebound strike.

Step 4: Use of Snarling Iron.

The mounting end is put into in a vise so that the chisel point will be facing up and towards you.  The container or other work piece is placed to be held steadfastly against the underside of the face that is to receive the bumps or patterns.  A sharp blow (wallop) is delivered to the top of the snarling iron between work piece and the vise.  The rebounding of the iron strikes the work piece creating the patterns or bumps.  Similar to repousse’; you will be striking and moving the work piece many times to create effects.   Having a variety of Snarling iron chisel patterns will help in creating different effects, but a single blunt point can go a long way.  A striking rod is used instead of a hammer so the focus is on the work piece and not the striking point on the iron.   I use different striking rods for different rebounding effects; cut off baseball bat, iron rod, pipe etc…  There is a striking sweet spot on the iron which is found thru practice.  For practice containers I use non returnable aluminum drink cans.  Work on following the design on can.

Step 5: Nontraditional Snarling Irons

I took the traditional snarling iron to the next step.  I eliminated the 1” chisel point, to drill and tap for interchangeable points.  I used different bolts (which I can grind) and arrow tips.  These styles of snarling irons are a nice addition to the traditional ones.

I like this,But perhaps some pictures of completed work would help to understand what the tool is used for.
I have trouble picking a subject to do. Once I find something to punch, I will post it. thank you for viewing

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