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There is nothing better at breakfast or brunch than a good old-fashioned southern biscuit. This version is very old school, using buttermilk, lard, and hand-rolling to create light and fluffy biscuits the perfect size for breakfast slider sandwiches or biscuits and gravy.

Ingredients:

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Step 1: Whisk and Fatten

In a large shallow bowl, whisk together salt, flour, and baking powder. Take one 1/4 cup portion of lard and cut into pea-sized pieces and add to flour mixture. Set a timer for 5 minutes. Using a finger-snapping motion, mix the lard into the flour until it looks nice and crumbly and no large pieces of lard remain. Shake the flour occasionally to bring large chunks of lard to the top so they can be "snapped" into the flour.

If this process took 5 minutes or longer, place the flour into the fridge for about 10 minutes to keep the fat chilled.

Step 2: Fatten and Form

Using the second 1/4 cup portion of lard, cut into chunks about the size of a marble and add to the flour mixture. Using the same finger-snapping motion, mix these larger chunks of fat into the flour until no large pieces remain and the flour looks nice and crumbly. If this took longer than 5 minutes, place the flour back into the fridge for another 10 minutes to chill the fat.

After ten minutes, form a hollow in the center of the flour and pour in the buttermilk. Using a spoon or a spatula, slowly incorporate the flour into the milk until a nice sticky dough is formed.

Step 3: Rolling, Rolling, Rolling...

Place the dough on a well-floured bread board and form into a rough square shape. cut into four pieces. Cut each quarter into three smaller pieces. Hand roll these pieces into round balls.

Step 4: Bake and Eat!

Preheat oven to 425 degrees Fahrenheit. Place the dough balls into an oiled skillet and bake in the oven for 15 minutes until golden brown.

I served mine as spicy chicken sliders with egg and white kimchi.

Well, I got an email which made me seem I had stepped on some toes.<br> &quot;What you are referring to is a &quot;topped&quot; biscuit that has been rolled out and cut. It is a sort of overused commercialized icon of what a Southern biscuit should be. These are just as &quot;Southern&quot; as topped, bomber, dropped, or any of the hundreds of other types of biscuits that are part of the Southern cooking tradition.&quot; I just replied: '*giggles to myself* Well, this is how we have made our biscuits for generations. So nothing overused nor commercialized biscuits here. Just the way my grandmother and hers before her have always made biscuits the proper way. ;) Not that yours is bad, or anything like that. There are many different kinds of foods, and that is how we learn what we like and do not like.' <br>I then got another email suggesting I might like to unsubscribe to the forum. *shrugs* Its only biscuits afterall..... :( I guess the 'be nice' policy only refers to the ones on here, not the emails that get sent out.
Emails? Forums? I thought we were all just having a fun discussion related to the concept of &quot;authenticity&quot; in baking.
~big sighs~
<p>maybe northern biscuits?</p>
<p>?</p>
<p>The photo doesn't look like any southern biscuits I have had the opportunity to enjoy. Pale, rounded.</p>
<p>I agree. Although they look like they would be tasty, they dont resemble 'Southern Biscuits' to me. Southern Biscuits are rounded but also flattened, but thick, and flaky. Like you said, maybe this is Northern Biscuits? Ive noticed that a lot of northern recipes add sugar to them, like cornbread. Noop not my cornbread lol. But thats how we learn new things eh? ;)</p>
What you are referring to is a &quot;topped&quot; biscuit that has been rolled out and cut. It is a sort of overused commercialized icon of what a Southern biscuit should be. These are just as &quot;Southern&quot; as topped, bomber, dropped, or any of the hundreds of other types of biscuits that are part of the Southern cooking tradition.
There are as many ways to make biscuits as there are Southerners. These are fairly old school, from a time when not every biscuit was shaped like a hockey puck and brushed with butter.
<p>Mmmmmm&hellip; I can smell the butter from here. :)</p>
<p>Looks delicious. Have you ever though to use butter instead of lard?</p>
Yes, I typically use butter with milk, and lard with buttermilk. You can interchange them in this recipe as you wish. It really depends on how light and fluffy you want the biscuits. Nothing beats lard for fluffy. :)

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