Introduction: Steampunk Nerf Gun Paint Job

Steampunk is such a cool looking theme, and when I received my slingfire blaster it just had to be painted that way. This paint job turned out really well and I am very satisfied with the outcome. Overall I would rate the difficulty of the build a 7/10 with the general process fairly accomplishable. Hope you enjoy this.

Before you start however here are a few of the tools and supplies you'll need:

- Nerf blaster

- Rotary tool

- Sand paper

- Philips-head screwdriver

- Paint brushes

- Spray paint (black, and clear)

- Detail paints (I just use house paint test pots)

- Lubricant (optional)

Step 1: Disassembly

To access the internals of the blaster first remove all screws from blaster, and then separate the two shells. (Note. You will first need to remove a very large screw from the top of the stock to expose a screw underneath it) Once separated remove all internals and sort into what will need to be painted and not-painted.

Step 2: Preparation for Paint

Dremmel off logos using a grinding or sanding bit. (Note. You really want to take you time with this, it isn't difficult to carve too far into the shell). Sand the panel unto smooth, I would recommend starting with a 300grit and build it up from there. Then with the trigger and lever tape the internal part that you don't want exposed to the paint.

Step 3: Paints - Spray Painting

Lay down some newspaper on a flat surface. (Note. Make sure before you start that no dust of dirt has made it's way onto the blaster anyhow). Begin by spraying long slow strokes along the blaster, paying attention to smaller crevasses and screw holes where you could miss. Wait 20-30mins to dry, then repeat the process again. (Note: watch that you don't over spray the brown over to the black, to avoid this you could paint them on separate surfaces).

Step 4: Paints - Details

Begin by brushing on acrylic paints in the necessary areas starting with the largest areas and working down. (Note. Don't worry to much about passing the lines on at the start, because you can always come back with the base colour to touch up). For the real steampunk look I would recommend maximising on the gold and copper colours.

Step 5: Paints - Grunging

For this first effect you need to have your brush relatively wet with a darker colour (in this example I'm using brown). Then you basically paint into all the corners, depressions, and crevasses, and then immediately come in with a cloth and wide about 75% of it back out again. What this does is leaves a small about of paint in these areas causing it to look dirtied or rusted.

Step 6: Paints - Dry Brushing

This is almost the opposite to the last effect, what you need to do is have your brush in a very dry state with a very small amount of paint on it. Then you gentle brush on the tops of the surfaces the paint. This will should make it look as if it is slightly scratched and worn paint.

Step 7: Paints - Finishing Touches and Clear Coat

Nows the time to put any final details to the build, in my case a 'Steamers' logo and the digits Z7. The final process of the build comes down to a protective coat, this of course is entirely optional but I would highly recommend it especially if you plan on using your blaster in anyway. The same technique as spraying the first coat is used for this.

Step 8: Reassembly

This is basically the opposite process of removing internals. Don't forget the small tactical rail piece and clip well. Be careful with gears to return then to their proper place. I would recommend lubricating internals for smoother operation.

Comments

author
JoshuaSmock (author)2016-04-19

I didn't really use this instuctable but I did something similar...

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author
Valley Films (author)JoshuaSmock2016-04-19

Looks cool, glad to see it. The Doomlands line is quite good for steampunk.

author
DIY Hacks and How Tos (author)2016-01-23

Awesome mod. I ave steampunked a few of my nerf guns and I like really like how it looks.

author

Thanks, glad to here it.

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