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I built this stove in 2010 and I have been using it ever since.

Step 1: Cutting and Welding

First I modified the barrels .

Step 2: Cutting and Placing Bricks

Then I cut and placed the bricks.

Step 3: Ready for Heating

It was then ready for heating.

Two years ago someone I know built this stove using these pictures as a guide .

He uses it to heat up his quail farm.

Step 4: Update 1

Yesterday (25.11.2014) I made some new pictures for you to see how it looks stove after three winters.

Step 5: Update 2

I made a sketch of the stove so that you see the look on the inside.

With this stove I heat a space of 60 square meters (646 square foot) or rather 150 m (5,300 cubic foot).

If outside is -16 degrees Celsius (3.2 Fahrenheit), inside are 19 degrees Celsius (66.2 Fahrenheit).

The workshop I heat has plank walls of 2.5 cm (1 inch) and polystyrene insulation of 3 cm (1.2 inch). So it is not very isolated.

<p>Nice work. Thanks for share. How many bricks you used ? at this moment how it looks? Thank you</p>
<p>Thank you very much! I used 61 bricks. The photos are from 27.03.2017. Sorry for the delay!</p>
<p>Good work.</p>
<p>Thank you very much !</p>
<p>Wow what a really nicely engineered stove! I too recently built one OUTSIDE! Because I fear of burning my house down AND I want unattended burning, this is mine: https://diybarrelstoveoutdoorfurnace.wordpress.com/</p>
<p>Thank you very much ! Yours look professional, mine I made from scrap :)</p>
<p>I built one of these type of stoves years ago. Worked very well until it burnt my house down. BE CAREFUL!</p>
<p>The stove is used for heating the workshop. It is started only when I work in that workshop. The stove never work alone and I do not ever overload. Always when I leave the workshop, I stop the fire.</p><p>Thanks for Comment :)</p>
<p>Really nice but fortunately I moved to Thailand and don't need a heater/stove anymore :-)</p>
<p>Thank you ! Good for you :)</p>
<p>Very interesting !! you did not show how you made the &quot;chicanes&quot; (i.e., STEP5 Update 2) (I do not know the english word...).</p><p>Congratulations !!</p>
<p>I think the english word would be <b>labyrinth.</b></p>
<p>When I built the stove, I did not know that I'll upload pictures on Instructables.</p><p>If I knew I was taking more pictures.</p><p>Thank you !</p>
<p>I really like your design. Having the two sections vertical and able to be easily disassembled is a great idea and a space saver vs the typical stacked horizontal arrangement. Have you considered adding an air vent for secondary combustion in the space between the lower two baffles? You may be able to more completely burn the volatiles and keep the upper barrel and smokestack clean of creosote. </p>
<p>Thank you very much ! Before building a second stove, I will take into account all comments.</p>
<p>While these stove can get very hot and can be adapted to different fuels they burn very fast and thus require frequent refueling. If you were to adapt a four inch stove pipe on top at the exit point and add about six inches of pipe and insert a damper you could control the rate of burn by simply turning the damper on or off. This would save a lot of reloading and also control your heat flow. I have used Wood heaters for a long time and cutting and loading a heater is a chore so you learn quickly the best way. These drum heaters are very effective but as with any open flame caution is always advised and a damper will give you an extra measure of control. Most hardware stores will have them can show you how to install.</p>
<p>&quot;cutting and loading a heater is a chore&quot; </p><p>Yes this is how wood stoves warm you up twice :-) But a damper is a very good idea!</p>
<p>Sorry about the delay, in the village where I live was a blackout for 35 hours.</p><p>Thanks for the tips. I'll keep them in mind when I build next stove.</p><p>I built this stove, especially to burn wood waste.</p>
<p>Cool! Or I should say Warm!<br>Especially the 5th step, I'm sure it increases the efficiency.<br>Have you tried to place a fan pointing at the upper barrel from a higher position?<br>That could extract even more calories from the fumes before they enter the chimney.</p>
<p>Thank you ! I'll keep your advice in mind, to the next stove.</p>
<p>Good instructable, thanks.</p>
<p>Thanks a lot !</p>
<p>I see from one of your responses to a comment that you hang a galvanized piece of sheet metal behind the stove and then say the stove can be within 4&quot; (10 cm) of a (combustible) wall (I know it is gypsum wallboard, but supported by studs and with a paper surface. </p><p>I think you should warn readers in the text that certain clearances from combustibles (walls, floor, ceiling) need to be maintained. In the US there are UL standards. </p><p>It would also be nice if your first picture showed a heat shield behind it. </p><p>My factory built stove has a firebrick lining and two layers of 3/16&quot; or so sheet metal on all sides, and still requires more than 4&quot; clearance to any wall.</p>
<p>Thanks for the advice ! I moved a picture of Step 4 in Step 1.</p>
<p>I really like your design. Having the two sections vertical and able to be easily disassembled is a great idea and a space saver vs the typical stacked horizontal arrangement. Have you considered adding an air vent for secondary combustion in the space between the lower two baffles? You may be able to more completely burn the volatiles and keep the upper barrel and smokestack clean of creosote. </p>
I'd want to check the NFPA-211 for clearance to combustibles with that flue pipe. Especially having two 90 degree elbows. It seems awfully close to the drywall to not have a thimble to keep it away from combustible material. Source, certified chimney sweep. bit.ly/visionfireplace
<p>Great project! Congrats on your win in the Winterize Challenge!</p>
<p>Thanks, it is a great honor for me.</p>
Where did the door come from to weld into the barrels? Did you modify an existing wood stove?
<p>I used only the old parts.</p><p>Barrels, I've bought them from a neighbor.</p><p>Door and bricks, I had them from the old stove that I disassembled a few years ago.</p>
nice work, love the before and after shots! do you chimney sweep it with all those turns? how far from the wall is it supposed to be?
<p>Thank you. The stove is easy to clean because the upper barrel is attached to the bottom with three screws. Can be placed at 10 cm ( inches) from the wall, if between her and the wall is hanging a sheet of tin (I put galvanized).</p>
wow thanks for showing this. My wife and I recently bought a farm in TN and the the large storage building/shop on it does not have heat. This would be a great inexpensive way for us to heat the building.
<p>Thak you.</p>
Nice work! This brings me way back to when my dad built something like this as supplemental heat for our kitchen. Made the house warm and toasty on those really cold winter days.
<p>Thank you.</p>
<p>Looks good. I just made a wood stove out of a scrap water expansion tank for my garage over here. I did not line it with bricks, or anything, so it probably will not last me so long until I have to patch it up somehow. It was already cold though, so I did not have any time to really perfect it.</p>
<p>Thank you.</p>

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