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If you think making bread at home is too difficult or too much hard work, that's because you haven't seen this video!

Super easy bread rolls recipe that requires no mixer, no breadmaker, no kneading. Ingredients list and step-by-step guide all in the video. Please check it out! :o)

<p>We tried this, it&rsquo;s pretty good for a quick style bread. It seems to be a cross between a ciabatta and a crumpet. We used King Arthur Bread Flour, Redstar Premium yeast, spring water, Hains Sea Salt. We opted for the &ldquo;plain&rdquo; without the oatmeal. We increased the salt by 1/3rd and reduced the sugar by 1/3rd. In a 75F ambient room temperature the rise time of 70 minutes was on the money. We found the dough to need more water than indicated about 25% MORE. We are also at an altitude of more than 5000 feet. We baked this in a small counter top convection oven (Cuisinart Convection Brick Oven) on a 1/4 sheet Nordicware aluminum baking sheet at 400F for 15 minutes. For the rise we opted to used extra virgin olive oil &hellip; a flavor &amp; crust plus!</p><p>Suggestions: use olive oil for the rise, a double rise in the bowl (use the turning kneading technique with a silicon spatula &hellip; don&rsquo;t punch down) may improve the gluten development and add more texture.</p><p>This would seem to work well with some caramelized onions chopped and mixed in as well as herbs.</p>
<p>Thanks for the feedback! &quot;a cross between ciabatta &amp; crumpet&quot; very good description... :) </p><p>Yes, double proofing would certainly help to develop more gluten. When I first started making no knead bread, I used double (and even triple &amp; quadruple) proofing, just like how you described, in a bowl with a spatula and fold/turn. I still do that when I make loaves to get a better structure &amp; texture (especially noticeable when they're a day old).</p><p>But I wanted a super-simplified method, so came up with this 'cheat' recipe. I find that when eaten straight out of the oven, the difference is very little between once-proofed &amp; twice-proofed rolls. My theory being that there is a high ratio of crust, so the crunchy texture sort of dominates... (maybe just my imagination :D). In fact, I'm working on a 'mini bread rolls' recipe that even skips proofing... (I know, sounds really weird, but surprisingly good results). Will make a video recipe of it in the future. :)</p><p>25% more water... Hmm, I suppose different flour &amp; environment would certainly affect the liquid required. 5000ft altitude sounds so high! I used more water before, but found the dough too loose, so adjusted until I was happy. Not a fan of olive oil in cooking/baking, I find the flavor &amp; smell too strong. Just a personal preference, of course.</p>
<p>Nice Video, easy to make.</p><p>I'm more of a traditional baker... (most of my instructables are baking related...)</p><p>When i make slack doughs (high hydration, aka water content), i form the breads by dipping my hands in water. This way, the dough won't stick and i gives a nice surface.</p><p>I form it, after the dough has doubled in volume. I handle it carefully, in order not to degas it. Then i shove it directly into the preheated oven.</p>
<p>Cool! Some massive bubbles you've got! I'll check out your article. :)</p><p>My bread rolls recipe is basically the laziest way to make some tasty bread by hand (well, a spoon), but certainly doesn't produce the prettiest result. So I call them 'rustic' bread rolls.... hehe :P</p>
<p>The better a dough is kneaded, the better the gas holding capability. (Bubbles)</p><p>Since i'm also a lazy guy, i invested in some equipement...</p><p>First, i kneaded by hand. </p><p>Then i used a hand mixer with kneading hooks. (they broke off after a while)</p><p>Then i got a Kenwood Major as a christmas present. (20 years ago...)</p><p>About 10 years ago i bought a bread maker. (Panasonic, i use it once a week)</p><p>The latest addition was a &quot;Ankarsrum Assistent&quot;, can make 10 pounds of dough in one batch... I sold the Kenwood to a friend.</p><p>Most of the time, i use the bread maker. Only one container to clean. Mixing, kneading, fermenting in one non stick container. </p><p>But i don't use it for baking. I don't like the shape and crust out of the bread maker...</p>
<p>Wow, sounds like some serious investments. @o@</p><p>The only 'fancy gadget' I use is a digital scale (&pound;7). I'm too tight to spend money on kitchen equipment... :P </p>
<p>Well, the investments were made over the last 20 years.</p><p>And it's a question of priorities... I don't like to go buy some fresh bread on sunday mornings and i'm picky about quality.</p><p>A digital scale is a good starting point to get consistent results. Allthough the water content of the flour varies...</p><p>When i started baking, i was proud of every bread i made. At some point, i started to compare it with the professional artisanal bakers around here. It was disappionting and i knew, that i needed to improve. But i didn't really know how. Most bread books (in German language) available at that time, were not worth the paper, they were written on. But at that time(around 1993), the internet was starting to be a useful information source. This led me to some very good books written in English. (Now, there is a very good book in German as well.)</p><p>The one important change was to work with preferments. This kickstarted the quality of my breads. To some, it may sound complicated, but it really isn't. It's just a question of timing. (My ultimate bread instructable is about this matter, it's interesting to read the comments. Well, at least most of them...)</p><p>Picture of a sourdough bread with a nice oven spring...</p>
<p>Lovely! Thanks for sharing. :)</p>
<p>This mornings &quot;harvest&quot;. </p><p>As i said, i don't like to leave the house for bread on sunday mornings. This time, the timing was somewhat stretched... The last beer was the one too much. </p><p>But then, it still beats most of what is available by monetary means... and i didn't need to dress and go buy it.</p><p>Baking bread is highly addicting. You just can't be without it for too long ;-) I even saw the need to bake a Sunday thread (another of my instructables) in Minnesota, while visiting some friends. It got a little tricky to use salted butter. But then, the easy stuff is for sissies...</p>
I used all-purpose flour. I'm not sure if this affected the rising time but my dough balls really didn't rise up much so they remained kind of small like biscuits. I put them in the oven anyway for 15 minutes and they came out awesome and delicious and my husband loves them. <br><br> I'm actually trying them again right now and measuring more accurately and changed the temperature of my water so hopefully they rise little more. the dough itself already looks more promising than the last batch it's a lot stickier.<br><br>I'm an awful baker even at the simplest recipes but these still come out tasty and a little sweet. awesome and easy for a novice who doesn't want a flour mess on their counter or dough under their manicured nails. thanks!!!!
<p>Thanks for the feedback! :)</p><p>Yes, proofing time can vary depending on several factors. Increasing the water temp a little sounds like a good plan. Or try a warmer &amp; darker place to proof them. You're right that even if they haven't risen much, as long as the yeast isn't dead &amp; the dough is moist enough, they'll still come out tasty if eaten hot out of the oven.</p><p>I'll shortly make another video that's a 'spin off' of this recipe, basically giving these rolls some toppings. I also have some other videos planned, all super easy &amp; little cleaning (even no-washing up ones). So more recipes to come! :)</p>
All some
Thanks! :)
<p>I followed your recipe exactly, including the parchment paper. It turned out very well, no problems. I'm a long-time hobby baker and will add this recipe to my collection of favorites. Thank you.</p>
Lovely! Thanks for the feedback! :) <br>
<p>I'll give it a try. Nice &amp; easy.</p>
<p>Lovely! Let me know how you get on... :o)</p>
I doubled the recipe and made two loaves. I used &quot;all purpose&quot; flour (which is what we had on hand). <br><br>I followed the instructions. We are at a higher altitude, so that may have affected the timings a little bit. <br><br>I greased a couple of glass bread pans with margarine and divided the dough into each pan. The first thing I noticed was that it took longer for the dough to double in size. I just waited. Took a couple hours.<br><br>Baking took about 24 minutes. It did not separate easily from the pans. So in the future I will either try shorting, or non-stick parchment (I didn't know they made that!) Ultimately, I should have followed your lead and put the dough on a flat cookie sheet.<br><br>The resulting bread is delicious! The oats add both a little sweetness and moisture. I love the taste. I also really like that there are no eggs. <br><br>Thanks! I'm sure I'll keep making this recipe!<br><br><br>
<p>Thanks for the feedback! </p><p>I've had my bread stuck many times too, when I was trying out different things, and ended up serving them 'crustless'... LOL. This dough spreads more horizontally, so if you want a 'loaf' shape, using a loaf/bread pan is probably the only option. Using a tray is good for rolls, or flat shaped bread like foccacia.</p><p>Yes, I've heard before of high altitude affecting dough proofing etc. Yeasted dough can be so variable anyway. Sometimes when the weather is colder here, and I get impatient after an hour and my dough still hasn't risen much, I put my oven on for 15-20 seconds, turn it off, just to create a warmer environment, then put the dough in there. But having patience would be best, a longer slower proofing should give better result. :o)</p>
<p>That's what I ended up doing, setting it in a slightly warmed oven. The result was good.</p><p>For the sticking, I'm wondering about using flour, rather than shortening to try to make it not stick to the pan. (Or perhaps both?)</p><p>I'm also looking forward to trying to add a few things-- herbs? flax? nuts? chopped olives? rosemary? Hmmmm.</p>
<p>Sounds great! :o)</p>
Can see it now, thanks.
No video!<br>
Hmmm, strange, I can see the Youtube video (below the first photo). I'm new to posting on this site, maybe I'm doing &amp; seeing it wrong! :S<br><br>Here is a link to my youtube video:<br>https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y548mZDH96w<br><br>Can you view it okay?<br>

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