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This is one of my favorite maker hacks. Learned this as a kid making models.

Step 1: What You Need

Mixing superglue and baking soda creates an opaque, hard, drillable, sandable filler. It also sets up and hardens almost immediately, so you need to plan ahead and work fast.

You need:
Superglue
Baking soda
Brush (optional)

Step 2: Ready, Set...it's Done

Watch the video to see the magic.

I like to use this for repairs. I use a Brush to dust the edge. Put the parts together and apply glue. Once you apply the glue it instantly hardens. I then apply another dusting to renforcement the seam. Allow to cure for an hour or more before sanding, shaping or drilling.

As a filler, tape off area and apply alternate amounts of glue and Baking soda. For thick pieces of filler, allow 10 minutes between layers of 1/4 inch or more.

There is an exothermic reaction and the mix gets hot, so use caution. It is somewhat brittle at this stage. Once it cures it's rock hard.

Step 3: Endless Applications

This can be used for modeling, automotive fixes, boating, crafting...literally, thousands of applications.

Remember, be safe. Use eye protection. Acetone can be used for clean up. Use nail polish remover for getting glue off hands.

Step 4: Share Your Favorite Glue Hack in the Comments Below. Lex

Thank you
<p>Would this be good for wood?</p>
Yes. It becomes very solid, like a hard plastic.
<p>cool as thanks. </p><p>very handy hack, will be sure to use!</p>
<p>Did this with some powdered ABS plastic instead of baking soda to fill a hole in a cover plate for my PC. I filled the hole with the powder then when I put a couple drops of CA glue in, it actually cured so fast that it melted all the plastic into 1 solid, seamless piece.</p>
<p>Toilet paper works well as a filler with superglue too.</p>
<p>Nice work! I'm an old lady who can't experiment (seen the price of super glue lately?), so I ask you. My '98 Buick has no garage; Texas sun has opened up a couple of 2 &quot; cracks in dashboard vinyl (?); don't care how it looks but want to keep cracks from getting so long that pieces of the covering fall off. Tried the glue alone a while back, hoping it would be sucked into the cracks &amp; nip the problem in the bud. Nope. Hairline opening - can't exactly shove in a putty knife blade full of glue. Any chance? Gel or runny? With soda? Should I just give up, hit the duct tape to hide the cracks, forget the whole thing? lol You have my vote.</p>
<p>don't use this on the car vinyl, but get a vinyl repair kit at WalMart auto section on an furniture shop etc. This will make a flexible bond to the vinyl and will fill it plus give time to smooth it out. The super glue will make it crack more as it is not forgiving when temperature makes you dash expand and contract. Bonus is also you can get the color matched.</p>
Thanks to everyone who offered ideas about my heat cracked vinyl dashboard cover. There's logic in each. After much consideration, I decided there's no way to stop the cracks from appearing or expanding. The solutions are to cover the dash, install a new one or just forget about it. There IS another solution, the very best, but it isn't available to me: &quot;It's a new CAR!&quot; Sigh. I really appreciate your help. Thank you.
<p>You might be able to buy a whole piece of vinyl large enough to cover the ash (for cheap try Walmart in the upholstery section or Joannes etc) and cover the whole thing ---which would mean you don't have to match or worry about further holes opening up--I would &quot;fill in&quot; the cracks with something you can jam or glue in there. On RV boards they have the same issues in the older coaches; you might check on some of those for ideas too. OR you could strip off the old stuff and recover or paint. </p>
<p>I used a piece of carpet on the dash as it absorbs the heat and is easy to pull out to clean. It will slow down the cracking in the dash but will had it too :-)</p><p>Don't use ducktape I did that and after a few months the tape shrinks in the heat :-/ and your left with the glue from the tape exposed and collecting dust and is a right nasty mess to clean up.</p>
<p>Hi Not a Pot;</p><p> Google : dashboard coverlay </p><p> You might be able to buy an easy to install dashboard cover for your car. I'm a retired upholsterer and those vinyl repair kits never do the job.</p>
Thank you, ArtS13. Used to see TV ads for those repair kits &amp; was always doubtful . . .cover is a good idea.
<p>There's something called gaffer tape that might work. You must use gaffer tape though not duct tape. Also called silage tape that farmers use. Used to repair blue tarps that have fallen apart in the sun. The tape lasts longer than the blue tarp. Duct tape won't work the adhesive is cheap; gaffer tape is a rubber adhesive. It comes in diff. colors too. </p>
Having worked with gaffers, I'm familiar with the tape, but didn't think of it. Thanks, nutley!
Hmmmmm. I'd give it a shot. Dust the Crack first, get the baking soda in there really good. Then put a drop of the liquid super glue on it and immediately wipe it with a wet paper towel to get the excess off. One quick swipe should do it. <br><br>If you do it, come back and let us know how it went. :) <br><br>Good luck
Nice idea
<p>I've used aluminum powder with my super glue with my robotics project and it's being used to hold the whole thing up</p>
Super method. <br>I already repaired many cases desperate with this way. Especially thermoplastics. <br>Last week, I repaired poorly designed oscilloscope switches (see photo).
<p>If someone were to discover a substance or filler which were to act as a retarding agent, that would be great. A little more time to mix etc. Diatomaceous earth is an alternative thickening agent that I have used with polyester and / or epoxy resin as well.</p>
<p>Try experimenting with mildly acidic fillers to slow down the cure. I am not sure what could come to mind (nothing for me at the moment.) Perhaps tartaric acid. Diatomaceous earth may also work, because it is so dry and will slow down the absorption of water from air that superglue normally needs to cure. </p>
<p>Crushed vitamin C tablets as mildly acidic filler ??</p>
<p>Yep... this is an old luthier trick for fixing broken guitar nuts (the hard bone or plastic part the strings pass over at the headstock) or for filling the slots so they can be re-filed to the proper depth.</p>
<p>Definitely a winner!</p>
<p>Note. If you are using sawdust and SG to fill a crack or hole in wood that you want to match the surrounding area the SG makes the wood dust much darker and it doesn't match well. Robert Larkins</p>
<p>Love it. And to think the glue was developed by DARPA as a field suture for military use. <strong><em>THIS ONE I'M GOING TO USE!</em></strong></p>
<p>It is still used for that. Also being used in hospitals in the Accident &amp; Emergency department and the operating room's I have even used it on myself when I cut my right hand cleaning a pint glass the type with out a handle put my hand in with the sponge and sliced a one inch cut in a semi circle just where your thumb touches your skin below the finger. Nice mess I really should have gone to the hospital but it was ten oclock at night and i would have had to call my daughter to take me so I did the trick with super glue and put rubber washing glove on that hand in case it started to bleed in the night but all OK but she made me go the the ER and was told the super glue I used was not the type for cuts {I wondered why it was bleeden sore when I put it on} Now I have big lump on my hand.</p>
<p>The medical community still uses superglue (Dermabond), but they won't sell it to the public... I bet there were too many people sealing up very dirty wounds with the stuff and causing more problems.</p><p>The industrial superglues we can all buy have many other chemicals added which can be harmful.</p><p>I was looking around and found the &quot;Pet&quot; version of medical superglue - same stuff as dermabond - called VetBond.</p>
<p>The availability of the medical grade of Cyanoacrylate may vary by country. I'm in the USA. Other countries, I don't know about. Youor mileage may vary...</p>
<p>Dermabond and other versions of medical Cyanoacrylate are for sale on the shelf of many drug stores. I've bought it as such. Commercial &quot;super glue&quot; is a safe replacement, as long as you cleanse the wound as you should be doing for closing ANY wound. I've used it for years in the non-medical grade, it's the same chemicals. My Dad was a doctor and Mom was a nurse. They used it (non-med grade super glue) too.</p>
You are correct sir, I was mistaken. The darn stuff is SO versatile, we keep learning new stuff all the time. The nice thing about the use of it for sutures is after about 7 or 8 days exposure to washing with water, it will get washed off finally, and the cut usually is healed by then.<br><br>I kind of love how they keep getting McGee on NCIS with the superglue on the keyboard gag... They haven't done it for a while, and with Weatherly leaving the show, it will probably not happen again.<br><br>Weatherly &quot;signed off&quot;, but CBS has a zero tolerance for substance abuse, and he got nailed with a DUI a few weeks before his announcement he was leaving at the end of the season. It happened on &quot;Lost &quot; too...
Yikes!
Actually it was developed for making gun sights in the 40's, sold to Kodak in the 50's, then Lock Tite in the 60's. In Vietnam they used it in spray form to stop bleeding and as a field suture. It wasn't until the 90's when it was finally approved by the FDA and sold as Derma bond.<br><br>Either way, this combination works very well for many applications. Super handy as a bonding and filling medium. <br><br>I want to experiment now with super glue and leather dust like the one poster was talking about.<br><br>Oh, don't forget to vote for me....<br>
I won't need &quot;Bondic&quot; any more, though it has it's uses...
FORGET? Not me, I voted immediately! This is a fab one! Maybe a new &quot;Contest &quot; for those who've found different or odd uses of Cyanoacrylate glue would be fun, we could share our tips too.
<p>I have a chipped food bowl with a hole near the rim that I need to fill. Would this be food safe? I would hand wash it. </p>
<p>yes it would be food safe. </p>
honestly, I don't know if it is or not. I'd go to a craft store that is knowledgeable about ceramics and see where they point you.
<p>Talcum powder or powdered filler also works, in fact almost any powder will do it because it gives the SG some &quot;body&quot; instead of being just a liquid. I've used slate and marble dust too; after I've cut a section, I carefully brush up as much as I can and store it. He's right about the exothermic reaction thou so don't get this mixture on your fingers!!</p>
<p>Will not last over time.Big name bird carver used it in habitat and several years later it reacted with copper wire and flaked off. Many repairs to pieces in museums and big time collectors.Be forwarned.</p>
<p>Been doing this for years to fill in the nut on a guitar. Works great</p>
That totally makes sense.<br><br>I knew a guitar player that liked to dab super glue on his finger tips. Said it &quot;reinforced&quot; his callous'.
Yes it does. I've done this before also
<p>thanks, voted for you on hack your day </p>
<p>Sawdust will also work.<br>Especially the really fine dust from sanding.</p>
<p> I've used this combination for years. You can make it even stronger with a piece of fiberglass window screen across a joint to reinforce it(sort of like fiberglass). Or wrap a non flat joint with string, braided Spectra fishing line is a good strong one. Another tip for storage is to keep your SG in the refrigerator. It will last at least a year. Otherwise it turns into a rock within months. </p>
I have used stretched out cotton balls as a reinforcer too. Pretty versatile.
I use superglue and tissue to fix chipped ceramics. But this would work better.
<p>Been using Rhino brand superglue for years. I keep it in my fridge, and it lasts forever (well, at least 2 yrs for a larger bottle), because it's water-based instead of some solvent, which will evaporate and also cause the superglue to become less effective. This is a new twist for me, and I'll surely add it to my repertoire of DIY! Thanks!</p>
Enjoy!
<p>fine sand does the same job and is cheaper, but both are brittle and crack, better yet add in white furniture glue to make it flexible and non brittle</p>

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