Introduction: Survival Necklace

Picture of Survival Necklace

THE SURVIVAL NECKLACE!!!

In a few days my wife an I are going hiking in the Daniel Boone National Forrest and in preparation for that I decided to make a survival necklace. 

While I don't think I will actually need this necklace, I figured it would be fun to have and in a really extreme emergency possible useful.  My original concept was some sort of eight sided piece of wood, after playing with the miter saw and some angle measuring device I decided a nice small, light weight, piece of wood would work just fine.  LETS GET STARTED!!

Step 1: Supplies

Picture of Supplies

Supplies

Ceder
Fire steel
Compass
550 Para Cord

Tools

Dremel
Saw- I used Miter Saw, because it makes straight clean cuts.
Gorilla Glue.... Wink*
Drill Bits- Various sizes, it depends on what you use.
Palm Gouge- You could probable use a knife or larger drill bits.
Vice or clamps- insure safe dremeling and proper gluing.
Sand paper or blocks.


Originally I was going to use Osage Orange for the wood, but all i had was a very large block and I didn't want to waste it.  I had a couple planks of aromatic ceder lying around so i hacked off an end.  Cedar is good because it doesn't rot real easy and it smells good.  It is rumored to keep moths and other insects away, we will see when we get in the woods.

I was going to ad a metal clip so I could wear my necklace on my belt or in my pocket, but it turns out the compass did not like that idea and followed the clip.  I tried smacking the clip with a hammer but that didn't appear to effect the polarity.

The firesteel is super cheap, as is the compass.  I bought the compass in a pack of 10 or so.  I think I got it on eBay, but it has been awhile.  The firesteel I don't remember where I got but this website seems good.

Para Cord, just google it. eBay is a good place to find it, but be careful to get the good stuff not rubbish.

Step 2: Step 1- Rough Cut/ Firesteel

Picture of Step 1- Rough Cut/ Firesteel


Step 1- Rough cut/ Firesteel

I cut out a roughly one inch by three inch block of cedar.
       It doesn't really matter what size it is, the smaller the lighter it is around your neck.

I picked and end of the wood with no knots or cracks and drilled a hole slightly larger than the firesteel.  I only drilled about 3/4" into the wood, so I would have more area to strike the firesteel if need be.

I put some Gorilla Glue into the small hole and pushed the firesteel in.  I tapped the end of the firesteel lightly to make sure it was snug in its new home.

Step 3: Step 2- Compass

Picture of Step 2- Compass


Step 2- Compass

I took a larger drill bit and lightly drilled a hole on the long flat side of the block.  The bit was slightly smaller than the compass so I used a palm gouge I use in wood carving to work it out to the right size.  This did not take long.

After making the hole I put some Gorilla Glue in the bottom of the hole and pushed the compass into place.  I put the compass in a small vice to insure a good seal with the glue.

Step 4: Step Four- Shaping

Picture of Step Four- Shaping

Step Four- Shaping

I felt like the piece was to long so I cut off the end a little.  I leave this up to your discretion, I figure the smaller the better.  I took my wonderful Dremel and began to round the corners and sides of the piece. 

***PLEASE ALWAYS WEAR EYE PROTECTION AND IF YOU HAVE ACCESS TO ONE A RESPIRATOR***

After I had it rounded a little I drilled a hole through the top of it.  Next up the Para cord.

Step 5: Step 5- Para Cord/ Finishing

Picture of Step 5- Para Cord/ Finishing

Step 5- Para Cord/ Finishing

I simply pushed a short section about 20" or so through the hole.  It was a tight fit so I used a piece of wire I had lying around.  After that I tied two slip knots (I am sure they have more professional names).  I can not explain how to tie these knots because I just simply know how to do it (thanks Scouts). The reason for these knots is so that I can adjust how low the necklace hangs.

Finishing- I used a Medium Grade Wet/dry sanding block to get any excess glue or small cuts out of the block.  I finished it up with a Fine Grade Wet/Dry sanding block to smooth it down.  I thought about tung oil or Danish oil, but instead simply left it natural.

Step 6: Thanks

Picture of Thanks


Well thank you for taking a look, I hope you enjoyed and I really hope it has inspired you to create your own instructable.  I have included a picture of my hiking stick's new para cord wrapping, I love it.  Kentucky Hills here we come.


Thanks Again, please comment I really enjoy responding.

Comments

itsruthanitha (author)2016-07-29

The Bush craft Jewellery is galvanized by the tried and true technique of ancient hearth creating. It incorporates a contemporary day version of "Flint & Steel" tailored into a cultured two part pendant.

reechowi (author)2011-04-17

I happen to live in the gorge area hope you enjoyed your time here.

rashidmaroof (author)2011-01-26

good instructible, gave me an idea, i might modify it for myself to make a sharp point at the end to turn it into a dagger like necklace. thanks again

atombomb1945 (author)2010-10-06

This is a nice and simple idea. Very refreshing.

gilleseg (author)atombomb19452010-10-09

Thank you, it was cheap and easy... I wanted to make it and the Gorilla Glue contest and our trip to Red River Gorge gave me a reason too. I ended up using the compass a couple of times but not the fire steel.

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