Instructables
Picture of Survivor Jack's Ultimate Emergency Car Pack
Recent Blizzards have left hundreds stranded in their cars for hours, days - up to a month in one European situation.

Join Me in a real world, thought-game like "The Ultimate Altoids Survival Kit".  That one's for a pocket; this game is for Vehicles.

PLEASE give me your feedback about "The Ultimate Emergency Car Kit" that fits in a #10 Can with the Plastic Lid.  An empty ‘long-term food storage can’ or a family-sized Coffee can are good examples of this size.

The first photo is an overview of my first one I've assembled.  As you read the article, I'll explain why I chose the items I did.  As You continue reading, think of other items you'd wish you had IF stuck in your car, especially with others.   Post your suggestions.

I appreciate your time & your help!  
 
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Step 1: Start with the Basics and Customize to suit Your Needs

Picture of Start with the Basics and Customize to suit Your Needs
My Kit started with a #10 Container with a tight Lid,  4 large, plastic, double Zip Lock bags.  3 were folded and put into the bottom of the can.  I make sure I have a lid that fits tightly to keep moisture in - and out.  This is the basis for a simple, inexpensive "Trapped in your vehicle" portable toilet.
Mattakers9 months ago
What stores will you products be sold at? Will your products be for sale soon? :)
Survivor Jack (author)  Mattakers9 months ago
My Survival Tool is a hold for the moment. I got to the 3-D prototype stage but I ran out of money. I'm working on some new projects which I hope will put me on track again - including a Basic Survival Series I'm writing now..
Mattakers1 year ago
Cool thanks
Mattakers1 year ago
Awesome!! You got one customer!!! If you could go into the wild with one thing what would it be?
Survivor Jack (author)  Mattakers1 year ago
When I walk out of my house (into the wild), my normal (EDC) Every Day Carry is 2 knives, a multifunction tool, two knife sharpeners, a whistle and four small LED flashlights on my belt. I have a poncho, emergency blanket, dust mask & ear plugs in my back pocket. Around my neck, I wear a whistle, rechargeable glow stick, water purification pills and a fire starter. In my wallet, I have a Dental tool - a pick and floss plus additional yards of flavorless floss & a needle (sewing & 1st aid kit). I also wear a solar watch and two paracord bracelets. I'm adding non-latex gloves, anticeptic pad and duct tape - more 1st Aid.

IF you mean I could add One more thing, I'd lean toward a 'smaller' machete, water or food - depending on 'landscape' I'll venture into.

Mattakers1 year ago
Awesome! When will your products be in stores? Will they come to Canada?
Survivor Jack (author)  Mattakers1 year ago
I'm hoping to begin selling by next spring. I should be able to ship to Canada. Thanks for your interest! Survivor Jack
Lorddrake1 year ago
another stellar post Jack. Keep up the good work.

I would definitely suggest some sort of method for passing time .. a deck of cards is a great idea since there are so many different games to play.

Another good idea is a small notepad or note cards and some sort of writing implement. It can be a great psychological advantage to be able to organize and write down your thought while in a "stranded" situation.

The granola bars are a great idea .. never forget the snacks :) You can even store those in the vehicle but outside of your can (glovebox is one place) so you don't have to worry about space.

How about a small LED light so that if the vehicle interior light fails ( or the battery dies) you still have a light source after dark.

I'm glad you added the emergency blankets. In most of the winter storm stranded situations, Hypothermia is the biggest immediate danger.

Survivor Jack (author)  Lorddrake1 year ago
You are right about the writing tools & LED. I saw another suggestion to fill the "last empty spaces with thin, plastic bags like you put veggies in at the store. These 'take no space and weight nothing' but can be put over socks to keep heat in or over hands inside mittens or pockets.