Instructables
Picture of Adult Johnny Jumper
This is largely a proof-of-concept project to create a device for people with disabilities to use for exercise per friendorphobia's request.  Their mother loved dancing and hated the leg lifts and arm circles that were prescribed as "exercise" in the later years of her life.

"You know those baby exercisers that hang in the doorway - I think they are called Johnny Jump-Ups. They suspend the baby by elastic cords, and the baby can jump and kick without falling. I would think there would be a way to make something like that for an adult invalid, to support her or his body weight while allowing them to move to the music."

So here is my low-cost and low tech stab at a device to help with some mobility support.
 
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Step 1: Materials

Picture of Materials
You'll need a few specialty items for this project.
  • A harness - Depending on their mobility abilities you might want a full body harness.  Just about any harness could work.  I didn't have my climbing harness but had this arborist harness.  I think a harness like the Black Diamond Alpine Bod would work well because of the ease of putting the leg straps on.  The nice thing about the harness I used is that it is designed for hanging on the harness for a long period of time.  However it is designed for a seated position.
  • A large ring - I used a three foot diameter ring from a clothing store rack.  You could construct a square or triangle out of lumber but I had this salvaged piece kicking around. 
In addition you'll need an assortment of things from your local bike shop, hardware store, or outdoor goods store.
  • 6-8 similar diameter inner-tubes from bicycles (these could be old ones with little damage.)
  • 3 or more fairly large carabiners, snap links, or threaded connectors
  • 20 feet or more of webbing, rope or cable.
  • Ceiling attachment rig - perhaps a large eyebolt into a beam, or a length of webbing tied around a beam.  Perhaps with a swivel.  Or, this could be replaced with a structure attached to casters that would allow for more mobility. 
Many of the materials you're shopping for will say on them that they are not for lifting or hauling.  Use some common sense here.  Many of those disclaimers are so people don't try towing a car or taking on some other task with massive forces involved. 
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hdown5 months ago
I have a nephew with cp and his 8th birthday is coming up and I always make him a gift and now I figured out this years thank you
Oh my god I love this! I remember how much fun those were when I was younger.
bgepp13 years ago
this is so funny! i always envied those little babies who got to bounce in those johnny jumpers! now us adults can have a crack at that bouncin fun product!

thanx
kjclarke3 years ago
what a big babby JK LOLZ
NickGriffin3 years ago
Really awesome idea! I worked with Developmentally Disabled and had some limited mobility paraplegics that would have LOVED this item!
Thru that association I thought of what my assistants used to transfer Wheelchair bound people in our care...it was called a Hoyer Lift (trademark name, I think) and it had just the right sort of sling to put the client in and lift them from the chair to baths, commodes, etc. I am certain these slings are available at Hospital supply stores, as they do wear out and the lift mechanism is something that lasts forever (I have the one that a Grandparent had for our home use-now put to good use elsewhere). It has been a number of years and I do not remember How the sling attaches to the client, however-I think it was buckled. Might look at one of these and see if it serves the purpose!
The sling has loops. Different colours for different fits
Creamaster3 years ago
It's "Jolly", not "Johnny": http://www.jollyjumper.com/
We got a jolly jumper for my sons.
Best. Baby. Toy. EVER.

If you ever need a gift idea for new parents, get them one. They are freakin' awesome! The only downside is that they're too small for adults... until now!
I work in childcare in Australia where we are expressly forbidden from using them. Too many kids with greenstick fractures of the legs, feet and ankles :-( I love the idea of an adult one, though :-)
I used one with both my kids, but I set it up so their feet didn't touch the floor (specifically to avoid green stick fractures) They still had a lot of fun. I used it as a little swing for them. I'd love an adult one too.
zieak (author)  Creamaster3 years ago
Hmmm... I've never heard it called that. And both seem to be trademarked names for products that are marketed that do the same thing. I like Jolly better because it is asexual.
zieaksmom zieak3 years ago
I think the one we had when Zieak was a baby was a "Johnny Jump Up" - he probably doesn't remember using it...
Actually, the brand of this that we bought for our sons (both of them had one) was called "Johnny Jump-Up."
tulekah3 years ago
anybody remember the set-up that the spy master had in (and i think the show was the "avengers") the ceiling was covered with hanging short springs with knobs or handles. my legs have always been lemons and the idea of being able to swing monkey bar style anywhere in the house has been a dream of mine. no need for wheel chair traffic lanes or crutches.
EmmettO3 years ago
Oh, cool, you did get this done! I had seen you discussing it earlier but didn't see the ible.

My wife recently learned about a track that some elderly or disabled people have that runs along the ceiling, allowing them to be moved from bed to places like the shower etc. Now I can't remember the name of it. Anyway this would be an interesting add on to that.
Ah they are actually really common. I worked for a short period in a hospital spinal ward where most of my patients were para or tetrapelgics, and we mainly used them. They are called a Ceiling Hoist, though specific names may change with brands. They use a full sling, usually that holds them in by wrapping around the legs and fully supporting their back, neck and head. They don't use supports like this- a rock climbing harness- cause they would cause skin tears.

Ceiling hoists are mainly used for bed to arm chair, shower chair or wheel chair. Though you can have some that move throughout the house, they are alot more expensive and dangerous (The patient swings around a bit, and with two people already assisting with the hoist it would be hard to get them through tight doorways or halls.

But all my patients that managed to go home had one installed in their bedroom so they had alot more freedom. Luckily with the aussie health care system most of the costs are covered, I can't guess how much it would cost in other countries though...
zieak (author)  EmmettO3 years ago
My grandparents had one of those tracks installed when my grandmother was limited to a wheelchair in the later years of her life. I don't know what that harness system was like though.
zieaksmom zieak3 years ago
I'm trying to remember how it went - it had something that went under her armpits and then "L" shaped metal pieces that slipped under her legs - I don't know what brand it was, but from using it with her, I don't think it would suit this purpose.
one14am3 years ago
I think I saw something similar sold on AdamEve.com But they called it "Pleasure Swing".
LOL! This made me laugh :-D
zieak (author)  xfactornos3 years ago
I noticed some of the traffic coming in is from a fetish site... I guess some of the pictures may be less innocent with that in mind!
brbenn3 years ago
I just found my.next.project!
rix_1013 years ago
My prayers have been answered.
Rob O3 years ago
I love this thing! Brilliant!
mstar3 years ago
How about one of those stiff canvas swing seats like they have at public parks. I remember seeing some that used three straps to form sort of a bucket arrangement that was held to the chain by rings.
boschwerks3 years ago
Love the idea, nice job!! What clogs are you wearing, they look super cumpfy?
zieak (author)  boschwerks3 years ago
Those are a pair of Xtratuff non-insulated 6" boots.
Iam4NUru3 years ago
After I saw friendorphobia's comment I knew someone was going to make one. You did a great job making it to. Nice ible.
zieak (author)  Iam4NUru3 years ago
Thank you very much!
Great creativity in the service of compassion; what a fine combination. Good job!

And...yeah...it looks like it might be hoot to play around with, too!
zieak (author)  nicholas19513 years ago
I want to put it outside hanging from a tree branch in the summer!
This is totally awesome!! I saw the original post you're referring to, and I love your solution! My only suggestion, is to probably stick with your harness... and NOT go to a climbing harness. I can see the appeal of the Alpine Bod (had one for years), but climbing harnesses really are not made to be hung in for long periods of time, circulation is easy to loose in your legs. I used to run rescue scenarios climbing... the guy stuck "hanging" in the harness waiting for the rescue to arrive was always uncomfortable after a while (even with the cushy harness). So for mobility issues, I think your solution is actually way better! Maybe someone can find a nice way to pad it :-)

May I repeat, I totally love that you did this proof of concept... I think this a huge kindness.
zieak (author)  AlpineButterfly3 years ago
Thanks! You're probably right about the harness suggestion. I get pretty uncomfortable in them when belaying for an hour or so.
gmoon3 years ago
Great idea! ...not so great title.

When I think of "suspension seat," I think of variations on the bosun's chair, which is still used by big-wall climbers, painters, window washers and riggers, etc.

Bungie cords might also be useful...
zieak (author)  gmoon3 years ago
You're totally right. I really was at a loss for what to call it without being excessively wordy.

Maybe "Adult Johnny Jumper" would be best!
Zieak, this is so cool! (It looks like something I would enjoy using, and I'm mobile) I don't think it's a problem that the user would be in a seated position - still able to move to the music. One thing that might have limited it for my mom would be the issue of balancing without holding on. She had shoulder issues and couldn't have supported herself very long. You may have addressed that with the possibility of the other type of harness.
It's so exciting to see something that could help somebody like my mom who delighted in dancing around her kitchen, but was unable to for a good ten years after her stroke. Thanks for tackling this project! Good luck in the contest!
zieak (author)  friendorphobia3 years ago
Thank you for the reason to turn a silly thought ("I think that those toddlers have the best command centers!") into a worthwhile pursuit.

My understanding from my limited time working with people with disabilities is that a lot of the work ends up being specifically adapting equipment to the abilities of each person. Duct tape and padding. I think you're right, this harness wasn't the right one for someone with poor upper body strength. But it certainly could hold all of my weight. Perhaps the addition of a chest harness with inner tubing connectors would be the right trick for someone requiring better support.

It was really neat to see how well you could sway, rock, swivel, pivot and make all sorts of moves even while restrained. It could be a good way to get those larger leg muscles active.

I was tickled today when my wife talked about ways to further improve it. I need a welding buddy at my beck and call!
Wow this is way COOL!!! I am a CNA and work with all types of people in wheelchairs and other devices and this would be sooo cool for them. My kids liked the Johnny Jumpers, and I always thought that it would be a cool thing for adults.
zieak (author)  BJdaWonderKid3 years ago
Thank you for the positive feedback!
NachoMahma3 years ago
.  Great idea. Great proof-of-concept. With a few additions for safety (eg, something to keep the straps and tubes from slipping on the ring), this could be a godsend to those with limited movement.
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