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If you have access to a chainsaw some dry softwood and a Swede here's a great way to make a self-contained camp fire with integrated pot supports!

Step 1: Cut 3 Slots In The Log.

Unfortunately I am not dexterous enough to use a chainsaw and take pictures simultaneously. Sorry. Use the saw to cut at least 3/4 of the way down the length of the log.

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I have, or am, all of those elements! Will give this a try. If you have to blow on it to get the fire started a bit; you now have a Swedish Blow Torch...
<p>Swedish torch?? Typical of the Swedes to take a brilliant Finnish idea and claim it as their own. Ha ha just kidding </p>
<p>I feel that if you cut the log just two times it makes a better torch, burns longer.</p><p>there<br> is even an option to drill one long hole from the top and one that <br>connects to the first from the side. Haven't tried one with just a hole <br>but have seen these for sale.</p><p>An easy way to light one is to drop some wax from a candle in it and light that.</p><p>They are called Jack's candles, or Lumberjacks candles over here...<br></p>
<p>Don't know about that one hole setup but 2 definitely works (great for cooking even better than the chainsaw option).</p><p>But I prefer it with the chainsaw because the heat also comes out from the sides which makes it warmer if you sit around it</p>
<p>Swedish Torches are great for cooking, and are fun to start! Did you see this featured in Make: Magazine and on their website?</p>
<p>I feel that if you cut the log just two times it makes a better torch, burns longer.</p><p>there<br> is even an option to drill one long hole from the top and one that <br>connects to the first from the side. Haven't tried one with just a hole <br>but have seen these for sale.</p><p>An easy way to light one is to drop some wax from a candle in it and light that.</p><p>They are called Jack's candles, or Lumberjacks candles over here...<br></p>
<p>I feel that if you cut the log just two times it makes a better torch, burns longer.</p><p>there<br> is even an option to drill one long hole from the top and one that <br>connects to the first from the side. Haven't tried one with just a hole <br>but have seen these for sale.</p><p>An easy way to light one is to drop some wax from a candle in it and light that.</p><p>They are called Jack's candles, or Lumberjacks candles over here...<br></p>
<p>I feel that if you cut the log just two times it makes a better torch, burns longer.</p><p>there<br> is even an option to drill one long hole from the top and one that <br>connects to the first from the side. Haven't tried one with just a hole <br>but have seen these for sale.</p><p>An easy way to light one is to drop some wax from a candle in it and light that.</p><p>They are called Jack's candles, or Lumberjacks candles over here...<br></p>
<p>I feel that if you cut the log just two times it makes a better torch, burns longer.</p><p>there<br> is even an option to drill one long hole from the top and one that <br>connects to the first from the side. Haven't tried one with just a hole <br>but have seen these for sale.</p><p>An easy way to light one is to drop some wax from a candle in it and light that.</p><p>They are called Jack's candles, or Lumberjacks candles over here...<br></p>
<p>I feel that if you cut the log just two times it makes a better torch, burns longer.</p><p>there<br> is even an option to drill one long hole from the top and one that <br>connects to the first from the side. Haven't tried one with just a hole <br>but have seen these for sale.</p><p>An easy way to light one is to drop some wax from a candle in it and light that.</p><p>They are called Jack's candles, or Lumberjacks candles over here...<br></p>
<p>its a while since I took a chainsaw with me when I went camping, but I'll keep it in mind.</p>
<p>Well most places you can legally camp make you bring your fire wood in now so doing this would be a great idea.</p>
<p>Many places you cannot bring your own firewood because of the possibility of infestations depending on where you live. </p>
<p>Split the log into eight wedges with an axe and jam them back together. Either bury the bottom, pile some rocks around it, or wrap some wire around to keep it intact while it burns.<br>But a chainsaw is a hell of a lot easier</p>
<p>Pre cut at home?</p>
Some entrepreneurs must have seen this and started marketing your idea. Have been seeing these precut logs at big box stores for $15. Guess i should start selling off my curb for $10.
<p>Yeah! I shoulda started a business! oh well. </p>
<p>I just found this grate for placing a pan on to ensure you have a level surface to cook on. I think I'll try to make one when I have a chance: </p><p><a href="http://coolmaterial.com/gear/the-reusable-swedish-log-stovetop/">http://coolmaterial.com/gear/the-reusable-swedish-...</a></p>
<p>Well done, Josh. </p><p>I am producing 10.000 torches per month, it is called Swedish torch Vulcano.<br>Contact Woodbioma if anyone interested in retailing or whosale in your country.</p>
<p>Wow! congratulations! that's quite a big operation. I guess it's much easier for some to just purchase than to make their own. </p>
<p>Tried it when camping this past weekend. Worked like a charm, and everyone was impressed.</p>
<p>That's great! we gave a bunch to friends as christmas gifts this past year.</p>
love it!!!
<p>&quot;Dexterous&quot;. I see what you did there.</p>
Is this so the ashes don't blow all over the place<br>
brilliant...thanks! I will use this at my next camping trip with my youth centre teens. <br>
I've used this before and it does work well. For best results make sure the slots are clear. I usually lay the log on it's side to get long shavings used to light the fire. Place a can or something similar where the slots meet in the center, pile shavings on top of log, then remove can. Place some of the long shavings in the middle. If the center has good airflow it will catch much faster and the shavings will have some bar oil on them and lights fairly easily. If you make them a few days in advance they will light faster and smoke less on initial fire up.
great work, this will be very useful for me!
Great tip, thanks for posting. I'll prepare a few logs before camping
If you are lazy, you can also poor a bit of gas in the middle, or use one of these white block to light a barbeque. Just press it in the middle and push it to the bottom with a little stick.
You might want to point out that with the lumber bit you need to make sure it's not treated lumber, as they tend to treat it with some form of Cyanide. <br> <br>The glues from plywoods are also pretty bad for one's health. But the other stuff should be fair game ;)
Interesting tidbit, while these are called &quot;Swedish torch&quot; in the English speaking world the word actually comes from the German word &quot;Schwedenfeuer&quot;, which means &quot;Swedish fire&quot;. I've grown up in Sweden and spent considerable time hiking and among people who live closer to nature, and I've never ever seen one of these before they started popping up online a few years ago. Not to say they doesn't exist, just that they might be rare in the country from which they were named. The phenomenon seems to date back to the Thirty Years' War between the city states that would eventually become Germany and Sweden in the 1600s.
That's way cool.. And to think they had chainsaws back then too! :-p
Wow! That's really cool to know the history of it!
We make these at an annual Outdoor Skills camp for our high school students. We use tree trunk sized logs about 5 or 6 feet tall. Each will burn and smoulder for the whole night. Instead of lighting it with kindling, we stuff some paper towel down the center and pour in a couple of cups of kerosene. Let soak for a couple of hours, and then remove the paper towel and light each one dramatically at our last evening's supper.
If you substitute gasoline for the kerosene, you can increase the &quot;dramatic&quot; effect of the lighting ceremony by a factor of 100 to 1. Of course, I'm joking about this; you should never use gasoline around any fire. I am, however, curious about why you would remove the paper towels before lighting the fire: doesn't the paper help with the fire starting? I also think the smell of kerosene isn't always pleasant, so I use a cheap vegetable oil; it doesn't really smell bad, and it gives the added effect of making the log somewhat waterproof, should it start to rain.
We remove the paper towel because we have had problems with the paper towel being too tightly packed and blocking the &quot;chimney&quot; effect of the central space cut into the log. One other note: Less is more. If you use too much accelerant on the paper towel, it will leak out the cracks at the bottom and the burning pattern will be negatively affected.
Do you put the tinder IN the log slots? After you might, do you bind the log peices?
Oh wait. You don't completely cut slots. It stops near the end... <br>
Really smart, put it up on my <a href="http://www.zombieyears.com/?p=4634" rel="nofollow">Zombie Survival blog</a> as another way to keep warm and get to cooking. Looking forward to do this! good for Hurricane survival too (the aftermath)&nbsp;
Firewood: check. Chainsaw: check. Now if only I could find a swede...
As when ive done this ..ive alway turned it over when the core catch's fire that way you use the top as a hot plate pans and kettles go on top ...
Clever! I'll be trying this one.
im going to try this RIGHT NOW pyro fire fire yes
What outer layer?
The log will burn from the inside as the airflow is from the outside in. This leaves an Unburnt section of the log on the outside rim on which to set a pot.

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