Instructables
Picture of Swimsuit/Wetsuit Dryer
Nobody should ever have to climb into a damp, cold, moldy wetsuit. With this heat pipe,  there's no reason to.

Everyone thinks living on a tropical island is all fun and games. Actually it can be very challenging. Now that swim season is here, we have to manage our swimwear carefully. It takes forever for anything to dry out naturally, and these fabrics do not tolerate dryer heat or sunlight well. Here is the solution.

You will need 

3 to 5 feet of 2 inch sch 40 PVC drain pipe 
a miter saw to cut it appart
PVC pipe adhesive to glue it back together
2 to 4 feet of rope and a hook
3 to 6 feet of rope lights
optional decorative fabric
 
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Step 1: PVC Pipe Frame

Picture of PVC Pipe Frame
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Judging from the variety of paints and adhesives, my ancestors put this piece of scrap 2 inch  pipe to good use. With that family heritage in mind, I cut it to pieces. Using this rash guard as a template, I figured my shoulders were about 16 inches wide. To get a nice bend in the frame, I cut 15 degree miters for joints. The angle isn't nearly so important as the quality of the cut. 

I butted the pieces so they laid flat and marked their positions across the joints. Then I glued them together with regular PVC glue. No priming is needed. Just hold the ends together for a minute or two and let it rest quietly. After an overnight cure, the resulting joints were too strong for me to break barehanded. I figured that was good enough.

I sanded the outside corners so they wouldn't scuff or snag fabric. But this thing was still hopelessly ugly.