Step 4: Setting up the Robot Head

Setting up the robot head is reasonably simple.  The first thing I do is remover the robot head and all its accessories from the trunk and attach it to the top with two locking bolts (photo 1 & 2).  These endure the mounted head will not fall off in case someone gets careless around it.

Next, I attach a power strip to the back of the trunk.  All incoming power will come through this strip.

I then attach the RAPU unit to the back.  A bracket on the wood case simply slides into a bracket I have mounted on the back of the trunk.  Then I plug in the RAPU power supply, and plug in the serial connection and the audio cable into the back of the case that holds the other power supplies.  Since the serial communications used by the RAPU only use two wires, I made my own serial cable from an old telephone cord.  That way I was able to use a phone jack instead of a 9 pin serial plug & socket.  The audio wire is then plugged in (I used a stereo phone jack and cord.

Next, I plug in the power cable that powers all the power supplies in the power supply case (it is the cord with the yellow plug).  The last thing I do is attach the spotlight and the spotlight servo switch, plug the power strip into an outlet and I'm ready to go!

Near the upper right of the 3rd photo you will see a white plug dangling down.  This is an additional serial connection to power a 2nd animatronic device (like the small one in the video).  I only use this when I'm using a 2nd device -- otherwise it just dangles in the back.

I also have two security plates mounted -- one on the power supply box and one on the trunk.  If I have to leave the robot head unattended in a public place, I use a laptop lock to secure the unit.
<p>Hi! Looks very nice! Could you upload a video please?<br>Kind Regards</p>
A link to download the video is at the end of the introduction.
<p>How many Degrees of freedom does it have? What is the total cost (100 dollars accurate) and just to be sure: no sensors were used, right?</p>
<p>waaw! that's amazing! very inspiring! Are you planning on making a case or fur or something?</p>
What I want to know is where you got that cool circuit board wall paper or whatever it is
It was a background drape at a national sales meeting, and was provided by a graphics company. I have no idea of its source.
to Mr.knife141 &gt;&gt; I am very interested in what you have created. presumably can you share how to make the robot and the robot code? please help me <br> <br>thx
How to make the robot is documented in the instructable. I would suggest you go back and read the words as opposed to simply looking at the photos. As for the code, I explain the approach I took in one of the steps of the instructable. The actual code would be meaningless to you, because it is entirely dependent on the dialog and and the movements required by the particular dialog.
What references do you use? <br> <br>thank you
Knife141, could you build a program like Siri, it'd be quite complex but I'm willing to pay
I have no interest in building such a program, but I think Apple has one.
to Mr.knife141 &gt;&gt; I am very interested in what you have created. presumably can you share how to make the robot and the robot code? please help me <br> <br>thx
I want to build animatronics for a living what do I go to school for
Sorry, can't really help you with that. I am self-taught when it comes to animatronics. Someone on staff in the computer science and/or engineering department at university could probably shed some light on the subject. Good luck!
<strong>can i have the code plz </strong>
This is awesome. Did you make a video? If so I would love to see it. Great job!
A video was included in the introduction (it is beneath the photos). I also included a link to the video in youtube in the text of the introduction.
Oh!! I see it now. Thanks!
HI, how do you get your demonstration dates? Do you advertise or is it through word of mouth? I want to take my animatronic, Peter Penguin, on tour.
I do a lot of volunteer gigs with Robot Head 2 -- mostly schools, church activities, etc. Doing some freebies tends to get the word out. Elementary schools are a great place to start. Find a teacher and let them know you're available (free of charge) to give their students a demo when they start a unit on inventors, or science, simple machines, etc. If you're interested in eventually getting more exposure, leave each student a photo of your device with some contact info.
Great idea! Thanks. I used to do a lot at the elementary schools when my kids were young and my sister is now a teacher there. I think that will be a good place to start.
Thanks for the kind words! I change the sound file based on the routine. Sometimes I give him a British accent, or U.S. accent, man's, woman's, etc. I thought about making his head a bit more &quot;realistic,&quot; but decided it would be a better challenge to keep the head simply out of wood and use the movements to generate expressions. It's a bit harder, but in person people are really surprised that a simple wooden head can appear to have expressions. Thanks again for the comments.
To reply to someones comment hit the reply button in the bottom right corner below the comment, otherwise the commenter will not receive your reply.<br><br>Nice instructable!!
Thanks for the info. Just learned something new!
No problem :')
A video was included in the introduction (it is beneath the photos). I also included a link to the video in youtube in the text of the introduction.
This was fantastic. The quality is actually quite stunning. Despite the really scary appearance I think that this could really go somewhere. Fill in the models with some kinds of fabrics or other malleable materials a little more appealing to kids. <br><br>Great work!<br><br>p.s. Didn't like how preachy the sound file was though.

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Bio: I enjoy taking a pile of junk and making something unusual out of it. I like wheeled vehicles, and currently own two motorcycles, two electric ... More »
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