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For me these cookies are mind blowing! You guys better try them ASAP!

Ingredients (for about 30 cookies):

Part 1:

* 250 g flour
* 120 g butter
* 2 egg yolks
* 100 g sugar
* 1 tbsp vanilla extract
* 1 orange zest

Part 2:

* 200 g flour
* 70 g cocoa powder
* 100 g butter
* 2 egg yolks
* 80 g sugar
* 1 tbsp vanilla extract

Part 3:

* 1 egg

Step 1: Step 1: the White

PART 1

In a bowl combine flour, egg yolks, sugar, butter (cut into pieces), the orange zest and the vanilla extract

Mix all the ingredients together, then cover the dough with plastic wrap and place in the fridge for about 20 min

Step 2: Step 2: the Black!

PART 2
In a bowl combine flour, cocoa powder, sugar, egg yolks, butter (cut into cubes) and the vanilla extract

Mix all the ingredients together, then cover the dough with plastic wrap and place in the fridge for about 20 min

Step 3: Step 3: Roll It Up!

PART 3

On a baking paper roll out the first dough into a rectangular shape 1 cm thick (2.54 inch)
Beat the egg and put a light coding on the rectangle.
On another baking paper roll out the chocolate dough into a rectangle 1 cm thick (2.54 inch)
Lay the 2 rectangles one on the other.
Helping yourself with the baking paper, roll the dough up

Step 4: Step 4: Slice It Up!

Cut it into rolls 1 cm rolls (1 cm = 2.54 inch)

Step 5: Step 5: Bake It and Eat It!


Bake at 200 C (392 f) for about 15 min

YOU CAN GET MORE RECIPES ON MY COOKING BLOG. CHECK IT OUT!
www.expatcucina.com
i made them they where the bomb<br>
Can someone please convert all of this &quot;g&quot; stuff to American measurements. <br> <br>(I abhor the metric system!)
I don't want to be annoying, but the right conversion is 1 inch = 2,54 cm :)
Hey, is there any way I can make this without a kitchen scale? Do you happen to have the measurements for it? :S
1 centimeter is not 2.54 inches. That's the wrong way around - 1 inch is 2.54 cm. Therefore 1 centimeter = 0.393700787 inches. Anyway, they look delicious, im off to make some...
oh, Sorry I messed up with that. But thanks for your help! :)
These are standard Christmas Cookies here in Germany, which is why I can give some more hints and tricks: They go under the name of &quot;Schwarz-Wei&szlig;-Geb&auml;ck&quot; which means &quot;Black-White-Pastry&quot; (go figure). If you google pictures with that keyword, it gives you lots of inspiration on what patterns to try. If you follow the picture links, some of the recipes have more pictures that illuminate how to achieve the patterns even if you don't understand the text. Basically, there are two methods of getting a pattern: Form a bar and cut, as shown here, or cut two discs of rolled out dough (one white, one black) with a cookie form and take a smaller form to cut, say, a heart in the center of each. Then take the black heart and put it into the white disc, and vice versa. Cover the cut edges with a little beat up egg yolk for stickiness. Bake. You don't need to add anything, just don't let the dough get too warm, the warmer it gets, the softer it will be. A soft dough might feel easier to work with, but the cookies get better if the dough is cool and a little brittle or short (this IS shortcrust dough, after all). You can put each portion of dough back into the fridge after using some of it, and you can put the final cookie bar back into the fridge before cutting it (when using the bar method). Just wrap it up in clingfoil, because this cookie dough will take on any smell you have in your fridge! The cookies come out best if there's no air between single layers or bits of pattern, so take care to press them together while constructing your pattern - only not too hard, or your pattern will be kaputt. For creating square corners, small cutting boards are a lot of help as a ruler, and for getting a uniform thickness of dough. Both aspects are a great help in getting good patterns. If at the end of your pattern making you have some leftover white and black bits of dough, just roll them together, roll them out to cookie thickness and make marbled cookies! :-) Last but definitely not least: cutting the bar with a cotton thread or thin wire instead of a knife prevents the cookies from becoming oval, btw.
would it be possible to make different patterns in the cookies? like checkers maybe? or would it fall apart?
Mix some more egg, or hell, even pudding in the mix to make the dough gluier, and you can pull off anything. it's the same process for making candies, actually.
oh. ok.
Ooh, these cookies are so good! I made some a couple of months ago, except they didn't stick together as well as yours did...
Yeah, I go crazy about these cookies as well. :)
I made these <em>years</em> ago, nice to see again.<br /> <br /> L<br />
seen this in the ultimate cookie book.

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Bio: An Italian living in China with a passion for cooking. I grew up in a picturesque town called Lecce nestled on the &ldquo;heel of the ... More »
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