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Being a full-time body piercer I have seen a lot torn and broken lobe piercings. As soon as I got into 3D printing I knew then that I wanted to find another way to "fix" those lobes. Some lobes are not broke in a way to just stitch them back together to repair them. Some are broke with parts torn off. Things happen in life that may not be able to be fixed, but this is one that I knew I could.

Step 1: Creating a Shape and Size

I took some measurements of the lobe I was working with to come up with a generic pattern to hold up to the ear. After that I began redesigning on CAD a prosthetic out of ABS to pre fit. See if and or what would need to be modified.

Step 2: The ABS Model to Fit to the Lobe

About 2 hours later I got this using my #xyzprinting Da Vinci 1.0.

Step 3: The Fitting

So this is the lobe and the prosthetic. I put the lobe into the upper lip of the prosthetic to see how things will fit. After this was done, i made the markings on the lobe to pierce the mounting hardware. The editing the design to put the holes in for the mounting hardware.

Step 4: Prosthetic Mounting Hardware (lobe Piercings)

In this step I placed the marks in the locations needed to hold the weight of the prosthetic. Then did the piercings. After that, played the waiting game for them to heal.

Step 5: Master Design

After all else was done this is what I ended up with for the master design. I built this out of PLA. I used my XYZ JR for this part. The end part was changed a bit more by taking a bit of the top off. That you will see in the next and last step.

Step 6: Lock and Load

This is the final part at this point in time. Already this is being build in new ways and upgraded in the mounting tot he lobe. This is a project that I will continue to evolve. Thank you for checking this out and I hope that all of you have a great rest of your day/night.

<p>how much does the final product weigh?</p>
<p>I did weigh it, but I can not find my notes on that right now. I will do a re way when I can and let you know. I know the build was a 30% fill to keep that down. It came out less than what I thought it would be.</p>
<p>I took a shot at the weight on my shopping scale, but its too lite to give me a number. </p>
<p>how much a final one or two weigh </p>
<p>Its lite enough that its not giving me a number on my shipping scale</p>
Cool use of 3D printing!
<p>Thank you</p>
This is genuinely a good idea! Good work!
<p>Much thanks. I hope to push this much farther in time. </p>
Very interesting/thoughtful idea...I think a lot of people will be thanking you. Thx for sharing
<p>I really hope so. I came up with this over 20 years in a way to fix mine it that ever happened. The only thing was back then I would have been carving it out of wood. Thank you. </p>
<p>Thank you. I really appreciate that. This is nothing more than a prototype, and I due plan to make the final out of a silicon. I see a lot more flexibility in use. </p>
this is a really cool idea, 3d printing has always been an option for prosthetics, why not boy augmentation too. have you considered casting your 3d prosthetic and making a silicon version, that way people can still wear a plug or stretcher as the silicone is elastic.
<p>Nice work, I like that this would allow people to change the look of their lobes at will. Definitely thinking outside the box with this one. Well done!</p>

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Bio: I am a business owner. I have been making and building things longer than I can remember. I love to work for fun and work ... More »
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