Introduction: The Homemade Air Conditioner/ Fog Machine From House Hold Items

Picture of The Homemade Air Conditioner/ Fog Machine From House Hold Items

Over the summer, my room can get pretty hot considering I have a computer and RGB strips everywhere. However, my family won't let me use the air conditioner because it waste money. They always say just turn on the fan, but they don't know that with hot air in the room, a fan just recycles that air by blowing hot air around the room. My solution was to find old parts around my house and make it into a makeshift air conditioner that is portable and can be plugged in just like a fan.

Materials:

Small fan

Styrofoam box/bucket

3/4 PVC pipe

Dry Ice/ Frozen Water Bottles

Sharpie

Hand saw

Knife/ Foam cutter

Duct Tape

Step 1: Measure the Fan

Picture of Measure the Fan

Depending on the size of your fan and the size of your box, your location of the fan will vary, I suggest the top of the box or the side. In my project I used the side of the box just because the fan would only fit on the side. You want to lay the fan on the surface that you want the fan to be located at and trace the size of the fan.

Step 2: Cutting the Box and Attaching the Fan

Picture of Cutting the Box and Attaching the Fan

After tracing the shape of the fan, start by cutting the shape out with a knife or a foam cutter.Cut this all the way around and pop the shape out. Use a vacuum and clean up the excess. After this, duct tape the fan to the whole and make sure to seal off any holes.

Step 3: Preparing the PVC

Picture of Preparing the PVC

After preparing the fan on the box, take out your PVC and measure out your pipe. I went for 3" each piece with 3 pieces. You can do more pieces or longer pieces, but that is up to you.

Step 4: Cutting PVC

Picture of Cutting PVC

After measuring out the pieces, cut them out with the hand saw and sand them out. You can use sand paper or a sander if you have one, but for me i don't so I scrapped it across the concrete for about 2 min and it worked fine.

Step 5: Holes for PVC

Picture of Holes for PVC

After cutting the pieces, Trace out the PVC on the side of the box you want the air to come out. After tracing all your pieces, begin cutting it with a knife all the way around. Pop out the pieces and vacuum the excess.

Step 6: Attach the PVC

Picture of Attach the PVC

Use duct tape and attach the PVC at an angle and allow the pieces to point at different angles. Make sure to cover up all the spots that air can escape. Tape all the pipes and make sure they are secure.

Step 7: Add the Dry Ice

Picture of Add the Dry Ice

After all this is done add Dry Ice to your fan and it will cool the air. How this works is the Dry Ice is cold enough to cool the air that the fan adds in and shoot it out the PVC side. You can find Dry Ice at a local super market, I got mine at an Albertsons. If Dry Ice is to expensive or you don't have access to Dry Ice, frozen Water bottles will work just as well. The only difference is Frozen water bottles will melt and create residue. Overall it works great, I have an average sized room, and it fills my room with cold air in about 5 minutes of it on.

Step 8: Optional Fog Option

If you guys want to turn this in to a fog machine, simply add warm or hot water in the box with the dry ice. With the hot water melting the Dry Ice it will create a vapor/ fog. And with the fan, the fog will blow out.

Comments

DiyWaterDog (author)2017-02-01

lose the duct tape and use pvc fittings. they will be more durable.

Goodryan50 (author)DiyWaterDog2017-02-02

Thanks i'll take that advice!!!!

blazinn (author)2017-02-02

Dry Ice fumes need ventilation??

Goodryan50 (author)blazinn2017-02-02

Technically rooms are already well ventilated, however I don't recommend using this in a sealed small space like a car.

Trancified (author)2017-01-30

Are you pushing CO2 into the room? Without very good ventilation you will suffocate from CO2 poisoning.

Goodryan50 (author)Trancified2017-01-30

I agree that without proper ventilation CO2 might cause CO2 poisoning, however its not like you are putting this in a sealed room that traps the CO2 in the room. Most rooms should be ok considering most rooms have vents and creaks under the door. The only dangerous place I heard of death by CO2 suffocation is in a car or a cab, because those spaces are small and sealed. I hope I made you more at ease if you still have questions please feel free to ask.

Swansong (author)2017-01-30

These are great for camping :)

Goodryan50 (author)Swansong2017-01-30

Yeah, they are especially in the summer when it gets extremely hot!!!