The Inexpensive Pinky Ring

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Introduction: The Inexpensive Pinky Ring

About: My name is Troy. I'm a Mechatronics graduate studying Mechanical Engineering. I love making things and doing anything outdoors (especially SCUBA diving). I am a Community Manager for Instructables.

My girlfriend loves rings! I guess it's not a bad thing, but it can take a chunk out of the monthly budget. Wanting to do something nice for Valentines Day, I decided that a pinky ring would be a pleasant gift that wouldn't break the bank. Having seen some people make rings from old silver quarters, I thought that making a ring from a Nickel would be just right for her size 3 pinky.

Step 1: Tools Necessary

There are only a few things needed to make the ring:

  • Nickel
  • Two Hammers
  • Machine Screw and Nuts
  • Jewelers Mandrel
  • Dremel
  • Drill
  • Sand Paper
  • Polishing Compound
  • Rag

Step 2: Form the Ring

Hold the nickel on it's side over the first hammer/anvil. Form the ring by striking the side of the nickel while rolling it to ensure an even 'mushroom'. After some time, the ring will form. Stop when the desired ring size is achieved.

Step 3: Drill and Pollish

Drill a hold the size of the bolt you are using. Using a larger drill bit, de-burr the hole so that the nickel sits flat in the bolt.

I used a threaded arbor in order to protect the threads of the bolt and the drill chuck.

I didn't like the hammered look on the ring, so I sanded it off using the following grit sand papers:

  • 220
  • 320
  • 400
  • 600

Remove the nickel from the bolt, place the sandpaper on a flat surface and rub the side of the ring to flatten it using the same range of grits as before.

Place the nickel back in the drill. Using a rag and buffing compound polish the outside of the ring.

***Remember to do this and subsequent steps in a well ventilated area****

Nickel dust can be hazardous if inhaled. For more information about this check out this page from the CDC.

Step 4: Remove the Inside

Using gloves and a dremel, remove the inside of the ring. I used an old pair of welding gloves to keep from burning and accidentally cutting my hands. Remove until the ring is the correct size. Size 3 in my case.

I used my variable speed dremel and turned down the speed to about 10,000 RPM as to keep from loosing control, scratching the outside of the ring, and stabbing myself with the high speed cutter.

Step 5: Polish It Off

All that's left is to sand and polish the inside. Sand using the same grits as before.

To polish, wrap a strip of cloth around a big drill bit and shine the inside.

Nickels from the United States are made with 75% copper and 25% nickel. Since the copper will inevitably leave marks on your skin, a common way of preventing this is to apply clear nail polish to the inside of the ring. This will create a thin, clear barrier between your skin and the ring.

Give it to that special someone in your life and sit back and enjoy!

3 People Made This Project!

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81 Comments

Thanks! It was really fun to make!

Neat! Great clear photos too. I might set my boyfriend on this project...

Very cool. I love how in the 3rd photo in the intro, you can still see the writing and marks from the faces of the nickel!

1 reply

That's the coolest part! You can still see that it was a nickel if you know what you're looking for.

Thanks! I'm hoping she likes it!

Love that part: "Give it to that special someone in your life and sit back and enjoy!"

Really awesome man.. I want to make onr of this :D

Do you think annealing the coin before hammering would be worth it?

2 replies

I think it depends on what coin you are using. From what I understand, most U.S. coins are really soft to begin with so I wouldn't think that it would be worth it.

Thanks

I just did one of these with a quarter for my wife. I ended up about 1/2 size too big, but not bad for having no sizing mandrel. My quarter came out looking more copper. I went with the rougher look and left it partially hammered.