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One work bench is never enough, I had enough reclaimed notty pine to hack together a simple tabletop and some spare 2x4 chunks. This isn't a how-to on making a bench but more of an inspirational piece for others hopefully. I was inspired by a pic I had seen in another inst'ble Someone had a miter saw in the background and built platforms on their bench to support the lumber even with the bed of the saw. I thought 'why not sink the saw rather than raise the table?'

So I removed the planks on my bench, trimmed them so I had a width enough for my saw to fit down into the table. Built a bottom for the saw to set on and made sure the bed of the saw was flush with the top of the workbench. The saw can come out and be stowed out of the way.

Now that there was a recess, it needed a cover to make the bench one surface again... and since it would be removable, I made the cover double as a router table too. All that was needed would be a secure way to fasten the router to the underside but enable it to easily be removed for hand work. I traced my routers' base on the cover, glued two blocks at near right angles along the traced line, so that the round router base would nestle into place. Another longer board acts as a swing arm on the opposite side to clamp the router firmly against the other glued blocks. A beveled bit of lumber wedges the router tightly to the underside of the cover plate. A simple bungee is all that is needed to keep the contraption snug.

The workbench is electric! I know, you'd never see this in the woodwright shop, but my bench plugs in like a lamp. I wired a n outlet under the bench and is controlled by a switch. This is so that my shopvac dust collector runs at the flip of a switch and my saw and router can as well. flip a switch and the saw can work or router starts spinning, with the vacuum starting at the same time.
I guess you are missing emergency stop button before your power outlets.
Pardon my ignorance. What is a &quot;bench hook&quot;? <br> <br>Thanks for sharing an impressive project! I feel motivated to do this. <br>
<strong>A bench hook</strong> is a portable bench stop used for holding timber that is being sawn or planed or chiselled, and where you don't need or want to clamp it or hold it in a vice.<br> <br> It's normally made from a piece of board a few inches wide and several inches deep, maybe a 1' board or a scrap of 12-18 mm plywood; and has two cleats <em>(say about 1&quot; square, or 1&quot; x 1/2&quot; even)</em> on opposite ends ~ one on <em>'top'</em> at the back that stops the piece you're working on, the front cleat is <em>'under'</em> so that it holds against the front of the bench.<br> <br> So a typical <em>&quot;bench hook&quot;</em> is really only about a quarter of the size of that one in the photo. You should be able to find a better description in any good basic woodworking or carpentry manual.<br> <br> Some instructive websites out there must have such info' as well..<br> Google is your friend at these times...<br> <br>
Nice job, very good 'ble. I am quite curious about your cyclone. First one I've seen with an inverted top bucket. Maybe you could do an 'ble on that. I'm about to make one for my slowly forming shop, so I'm interested in any ideas. Ever build something and two weeks later you see a better design?....
Very cool workbench. I've been planning one for a while, just haven't had the time or space. I like how you made a spot for both the router and the miter saw. My plan was to make a couple insert plates, one for a router and one for a circ saw (instant table saw).
I've seen people work in the oddest of places, under their porches, under tarps in their backyards, under a set of stairs. They just find a spot no one else is using and dig in there like an Alabama tick! So no more of this you don't have the space stuff. You just haven't found it yet.
You make a great point. The main thing for me has been time. I didn't mention that the workbench I've been thinking of is a folding one that not only has folding legs but folds in half. There were many reasons for this, but the main two were 1) At the time I was unemployed and getting ready to be married and I was going to move into my wife's condo (no garage and she had a roomate, so very little space. the fold and store was a necessity) 2) I was tired of using the old two saw horses and plywood setup. <br><br>Then I got a job and we had to move and we got a house AND I got my detached garage workshop *giggles like a giddy little school girl* I still plan on making my portable workbench because I've had to many instances where a project requires to pack up the tools and go to the remote site, so I just like the portable option.
There is a video on Youtube about this guy who made a portable workbench and I have to admit he seems to have thought about just about everything. Let me try to find it.<br> <br> <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sJoGTf6KL8s" rel="nofollow">This is it.</a>
When I do switched outlets I usually just switch one side, and let the other side stay hot all the time. But then I can't turn two things on and off with one switch when I do that. To do that I break the connection tabs in the outlet.

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