Instructables

Hello, Instructables! Today, I will be showing you how to make your very own DIY Oculus Rift called The Nova!

In this instructable, I will be walking you through the design of The Nova's headset, the build process of said headset, and the head tracking techniques used in order to create the illusion of virtual reality.

Without any further ado, let's get to building!

 
Remove these adsRemove these ads by Signing Up

Step 1: First Things First: Why go DIY?

Picture of First Things First: Why go DIY?

Good question! With the Oculus Rift releasing sometime within the next year or so, and plenty of Oculus Rift Development Kits available for sale and preorder, making your own Virtual Reality Headset would seem a bit absurd.

However, there are many reasons why you'd want to make your own:

  • You don't have to wait for the official release.
    Let's face it—the Oculus Rift won't get here soon enough. Why wait, when you can make your own?
  • You want to learn more about VR.
    The Virtual Reality market is growing at an exponential rate. You can get in on the VR craze and learn a thing or two by building your own VR headset—you could even brainstorm a new VR concept that you can implement into your own VR headset and share with the world.
  • You can create your own design that fits your needs.
    The Oculus Rift has many great features and looks pretty slick, but what if you could come up with a better design? One that suits your face better, maybe? Or maybe make one in a different color? The sky's the limit: this is YOUR VR headset!
  • It's a great weekend project.
    The total build time is ~30 hours, including cutting out the pieces, hot gluing everything together, soldering the head tracking LEDs, and setting up the software. You can start making your own VR headset on a Friday afternoon and be up and running by Sunday afternoon!
  • You can make one yourself without being bought out by a sketchy third party
    Looking at you, Palmer. I don't blame him though, 2 billion dollars is a lot of money to go into making a high-quality and affordable VR unit, so maybe things will work out in the end. Until then, you can still make your own VR headset for less than half the cost of the current development kit!


Are you convinced yet? Great! Then let's go on to the next step: Parts and Tools!

1-40 of 126Next »
millmore made it!3 months ago

I've made a version of this using my headMouse (which you link to above) as the motion controller. I used the polystyrene box that the screen came in to make a holder for everything - I just sliced it in a few layers, fitted everything at the correct distances, then taped it back together.

I found that I got dreadful distortion using the sort of lenses you described originally - the ones that are basically designed for LEDs. However, I got some cheap fresnel lenses, and they worked much better. They don't have the best optical properties in the world, but are easy to work with, and don't suffer much distortion or chromatic aberration.

IMAG0329.jpgIMAG0333.jpg
Tomcat94 (author)  millmore3 months ago

Wow, that's fantastic!

I'm sorry to hear about the lenses, though. At the end of the parts and tools step, I warned not to use the lenses I initially used:
"I also don't recommend buying the lenses I bought, because the distortion around the edges is awful and I had to buy a new set of lenses--specifically, these lenses here."
I left the lenses I bought in the description for documentation purposes only, but it appears I may need to remove them completely to avoid further confusion.

Anyway, what's done is done. Your DIY Rift looks great, and I'm sure both you and your family enjoy it! Great job!

Instead of completely removing the original lens information, maybe just a strike-out tag around it... and bold or underline the new lens info. That way it's there for documentation, and prevents future confusion.

If we were going to search for the lenses, would we be looking for aspheric lenses? I'd like to shop around, unless you're confident the one you have in the link is sufficient.
millmore Tomcat943 months ago
Yea, I ordered my parts before you updated the guide. I did consider also buying the loupes when I saw your update, but they weren't available to ship to the UK in a reasonable time, and I was impatient to get on.

The lenses are by far the most tricky part of this in my opinion, and it really needs almost binocular quality optics and adjustability to give a good display - i.e. for optimal display, you need the lenses at the correct distance and angle with sub millimetre precision, and for different people's eyes you ideally need adjustable eye separation, and different focusing in each eye. I mounted the fresnel lenses in binder clips, which make sure it is perfectly flat and allows for eye width adjustment, and I think it would actually work really well with better quality lenses (mine were £1 "mini magnifier sheets"). It's given me a new respect for the Oculus Rift developers though.
edmogeor3 months ago

For anyone (and you tomcat for future builds) intrested in using Arduino to track the head position, I found a brilliant project called 'EdTracker' at http://edtracker.org.uk/ its an arduino project, a custom board can even be bought from the people behind it that creates a small little tracker. It connects via USB and displays on a Windows PC as a joystick, so in theory should work with games such a minecraft, if not software can be downloaded to convert this signal into mouse movements, all parts can be bought for around £10 ($15) so is a similar price to some of the airmouses available, this will also improve latency as it is connected via usb rather than wirelessly. Have not yet built this tracker but may post an instructable at a later date.

Thought people may be interested

I'm going to be using this, thank you! If you want to buy them all separately (cause they're currently out of stock), I've found the boards for 9 and 5 dollars + shipping. I've got some spare circuit board and button, but they should be a negligible price.

Pro Micro: http://www.ebay.com/itm/New-Pro-Micro-ATmega32U4-5...

Gyroscope: http://www.amazon.com/GY-521-MPU6050-Gyroscope-Acc...

Drakencas4 months ago

just one question... what is the best price-quality head tracker

Tomcat94 (author)  Drakencas4 months ago

I'll give you a quick run-down:

An infrared head tracking unit will run you ~$20 for LEDs, wires, a battery pack, and the Playstation Eye, ~$12 if you decide to just use your current webcam. It works well enough, and is a fairly good head tracker that can track roll, x, y, and z positioning.

I haven't used Arduino, but from what I can gather from this instructable, Arduino will run you about ~$30 to $40. It's a precise head-tracker with low jitter and hardly any noticeable drift. It's wired unfortunately, although I'm sure dropping another $10 for a bluetooth module would alleviate that particular problem.

I experimented with a friend's air mouse the other day and liked it, so I went ahead and ordered a cheap one for $17. It's pretty precise for the price, but doesn't offer any roll, x, y, or z positioning, only mouse look.

So, I'd say if you need to track the roll, x, y, and z position of your head, go the IR route. If you don't care about that and just want to look around with the mouse, buy a cheap air mouse. If you just want to look around with the mouse and spend a little extra to learn about arduino along the way, then go with Arduino.

It's a toss-up between cheap air mouse and IR tracker. The cost difference is about $5 to $10, they both work well, and the only difference is the IR tracker's ability to track the roll of your head and the x, y, and z positioning. Decide which features you want or don't want, and buy the one that best suits your needs.

Zack880 Tomcat944 months ago

Is it possible to use an air mouse and an IR tracker at the same time? I was hoping to install a 9DOF sensor or air mouse along with an IR tracker onto the googles and basically disabling the pitch and yaw in the IR tracker software and enjoying the benefits of both worlds. :)

Tomcat94 (author)  Zack8804 months ago

Yes! I can't think of a reason why it wouldn't work, so go ahead!

hi, I have been thinking what i wanted, but i think i am going for the air mouse. im just asking why you need the x y z and roll. when do you need it, in which games.

Tomcat94 (author)  Drakencas4 months ago

The x, y, z, and roll are used mainly for simulation games such as Microsoft Flight Simulator, Euro Truck Simulator, Arma II, F1 Racing 2013/2014, and Freespace II. If you're into simulations, x, y, z, and roll only enhance the experience.

An air mouse would be ideal for just about any other game that normally uses the mouse to look and doesn't decouple the head and weapon direction, such as first person shooters like Half-Life 2, Portal 2, Left 4 Dead 2, and Borderlands 2, or even first person exploration games like Dear Esther and Amnesia: The Dark Descent.

hi, its me again. I need your help :$ I have everything except for the lenses. You recommended not to buy the lenses you bought first, but the ones you bought after that are a little to expensive for me. Can i just buy 2 loupes with the right size lenses in it and then take them out of the loupe?

Tomcat94 (author)  Drakencas4 months ago

No problem! Yes, just about any 51mm loupe lens should work. The reason the ones I linked to are expensive is because they provide less lens distortion (which could cause eye strain!), so be careful and make sure you get a good set of lenses. You should be able to easily remove the lenses from a loupe, absolutely.

thanks for your reply. I never play simulation games and im not really interested in them, so im going for a air mouse. thank you for helping me out! :)

i wonder can i just use cardboard then ABS sheet?

Hi :) im having a tech fair coming soon and this seems like a cool but simple proyect. do you think its a proyect that teenager can do?

TraeB20 days ago

I like this. I would be especially interested in combining some of the head trackign methods with the likes of Google Cardboard (in the future, at least) to create something more accurate.

Another piece of advice. This will be your biggest improvement. Walk into a local optomologists office with the thing, and ask them if they would be interested in adjusting the lenses. Hell, just a recommendation of the lenses type to use from an otpomologist nerd would be a huge improvement at minimum cost. I would really like to see some lenses have a non-circular shape so that application could be applied accurately in cardboard or 3d printed plates.

hkerr21 days ago
BartoszK1 month ago

hi, its a really nice project but the screen is quite expensive. So would it be possible to use bare lcd display screen from e.g galaxy s5 as it would have higher resolution and it would be smaller and lighter overall. So if i can could someone please tell me how to hook it up to pc. Here's the link for the lcd: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/LCD-SCREEN-DISPLAY-FOR-SAMSUNG-i5500-GALAXY-5-EUROPA-GT-i5500-/281055373582?pt=UK_Replacement_Parts_Tools&hash=item417034a90e

thanks straight away. :D

I second this, A good question would also be how would you go around over clocking the refresh rate of this screen, or a website where we could find controllers for these smartphone screens.

donhaynes1 month ago

First of all, great instructable! I was so excited to find this that I immediately started ordering stuff. The problem is, that when I tried to build revision 2 of your HMD, I can't get the lenses to align the image properly when they are so close together. When I hold them freehand over the screen, It takes well over an inch of distance to make the screen look right. Is there any fix for this, or am I going to have to just build your original design?

Did you make a partition between both eyes. What I mean is a "wall" between the eyes from the lenses to the screen. This avoids the change for the eyes to see a bit of part that the other eye has to see.

I didn't do that, but I will. I figured it had to do with the lenses being so close together. Thanks a lot!

After much experimentation, I've found that it's definitely an issue with the lenses being so close together. Even with a wall it didn't help. The only thing that helps is separating the lenses a bit (well, a lot). But even when I get the focus and separation issue in order, it's still low quality video, so I'm just going to wait until the Rift hits stores.

Is it possible you got the dimension wrong in the updated cutout? Every side seem to be correct except for the 17,5cm of the Top/bottom and backplate. It is 17 cm if I measure it.

can u use a web cam instead of a ps eye

What is the thickness of the screen, and the dimensions of the controller board and keyboard (height, width, and thickness)? I'm planning on 3D printing the 2.0 case. I'm going to also print a holder for the screen/controller with the "keyboard" on top.

The reason I'm going to make a holder is to make it easier to get it in and out for adjustments, to reduce the need for glue, and so it looks nicer. I might have a problem with letting light in. I doubt it, and I'll figure out how to fix it if I do. I might just add some fluff material. This is what I have so far for it.

HMD_1.jpgSlider_1_1.png

Is it possible to upload a new parts list for the updated 2.0 version?

FreddyW1 month ago

How much would this project cost without head tracking?

cazboi2 months ago

Hi :) I wondered if there was any way to play normal oculus rift games? Like the demos without mouselook? Because currently i cant look around using my air mouse :( Does anyone know how I can make the mouse input act as an Oculus Rift? Any help would be appreciated ;) Thx for reading.

bowgey4 months ago

great one... looks difficult at sensor part... :/

cfaarlund bowgey2 months ago

You should use an Air mouse :) Look at the updated edition (last page).

cfaarlund bowgey2 months ago

You should use an Air mouse :) Look at the updated edition (last page).

cfaarlund bowgey2 months ago

You should use an Air mouse :) Look at the updated edition (last page).

cfaarlund bowgey2 months ago

You should use an Air mouse :) Look at the updated edition (last page).

dconciliatore2 months ago

Hi, I'm using a gyroscopic mouse but when I try Minecrift (and other Oculus games like Tuscany) I can only move the camera horizontally. How can I fix this?

Hi! :) I had this problem with Minecrift, i was not able to move the normal mouse either... I found a setting in minecaft, where you could enable it to rotate up/down. I dont remember where, but think its in the VR settings. Hope this helps ;)

1-40 of 126Next »