loading
     For some reason my wife decided we need to up grade our TV. I'm not sure why, we had a perfectly fine 20" Magnetbox, sure it's not a Sorny or a Panaphonic but it was a TV none the less.  Now despite advances in television imaging, the on-board sound of LCD's approximates the quality of a tin can telephone. I'm sure this is for technological reasons and not just so they can sell you a $500 speaker system.
     Well, when my wife started complaining about the sound, I put my foot down and said I'd rig it to the stereo system we never use, I figured this would suffice since neither my wife nor I are audiophiles, for the same reason we aren't occultist, or ghost hunters.
     Still,since the speakers couldn't just sit on the tile, I whipped up a simple solution.

*Does not include time spent watching paint dry.

Step 1: First, Getting Design Approval

I cranked out a quick Solidworks assembly and dazzled my wife with it.To quote "Whatever, just don't make it too ugly"


Step 2: The Cutting

I started with some scrap 1/2" ply I had handy and started by ripping it into 5 3/16ths in strips. From these strips I cross cut 4 pieces 24" long and 10 pieces 9 3/16ths long.  Remember if you make all you equal length cuts at the same time, they will be even, if you come back and re-cut some will come out odd.

Step 3: The Assembly

Make sure to check for square as you go, all assembly was done using wood glue and brad nails.  Start by attaching the piece at the top and the piece at the bottom. If your saw was set up correctly you shouldn't need to worry about square.

Step 4: Build the Box

Take four pieces of the 9 3/16ths length and rip them to a width of 4 11/16ths. Use these pieces to build the top and bottom of the box.

Step 5: Stability Is Key

Especially if you have large dogs who can wreak destruction like in the first image on this step. So find a brick that will fit in the box, but don't just drop it in there. We want to pad the brick, prevent any resonance and just plain old shifting around, so wrap that brick in a ton of newspaper and stuff it in.

Step 6: Close the Box

Measure the width you'll need and rip the two remaining pieces to fit, you may need to "ease" the inside edges if the it is tight.

Step 7: Finish

Time for sanding, yeah we all hate sanding. So I hit it with the ROS at 120 grit to make it smooth. Then I sprayed on a coat of flat black paint, flat black being good because it drys damnably fast. So take a 20 min break and hand sand with 120 to knock the hairs down. I then finished with two coats of spray semi-gloss black.
At that point I was done, I just sat back and waited for the praise to roll in,"They'll do", high praise indeed!

Lastly, I need to tack the speaker wire along the edge, I'll get to it some day.

<p>I like it! Particularly the brick idea. I would probably add another panel, maybe ply to close the back off and hide the wires. It should also add some more rigidity.</p>
A fun read.&nbsp; Thanks.&nbsp; :D<br /> <br />
.&nbsp; Very nice job.<br /> . <br /> .&nbsp; A full-range speaker needs to be near the floor and/or walls to get the best bass response. Your stands would probably work best with satellite speakers in a system with a subwoofer. YMMV<br />
Great work, I&nbsp;love the finished product.&nbsp; Knowing it's woman-approved is a good thing that more Instructables should specify.<br />

About This Instructable

6,080views

12favorites

License:

Bio: Working my dream job in the Telecom industry, so chances are, i'll never have time to respond to comments or messages, nothing personal.
More by Tool Using Animal:Pie-tenna, The simplest HDTV antenna possible, possibly. Converting EPub Formatted Books to Use on the Kindle Salvaging the Fresnel Lens from  a Rear Projection TV 
Add instructable to: