Step 5: Downsides and Drawbacks

No, this is not the end all method to painting your car. This process was not intended to produce show quality results, nor is it intended to be as good as a professional paint job. It is however an excellent method to bring some life back to your car at a very reasonable price. I could see this making a great Father / Son project on the boy's first car. It was good enough for me and my 19 year old car and it just might be good enough for you, BUT...

I have been told that the paint will chalk, chip and fade all within a year. I have also been told that if you want to seek a professional paint job after having performed this paint job on your car, you will need to have all of the Rustoleum stripped off completely before the new paint can be applied.

My rebuttle...? So what.

Even if the paint does chip, fade or crack within a year, I'll just throw another coat on and perhaps improve the prep work to help avoid it happenign again. Now that I have painted the entire car, I think I could paint one damaged area rather quickly... even the whole car again if needed. Plus Rick, the gentleman who did the $50 paint job write up, posted pictures of his car at 4 months, 8 months and a year after his paint job was complete. He shows no signs of anything past normal wear and tear on his paint. His car, just like mine, is a daily driver and is parked outside nightly. However, he did finish his paint job with some heavy sanding and a polish.

As for seeking a professional paint job after having performed this one, I dont think so. That was the purpose of doing this myself! To not have to pay someone else to do it! If you are thinking of getting a professional paint job on your car in the future after having done this to it, perhaps you should seek some knowledge from the paint shop first.

Again, is this a method you would use on a rare collector car? No.
On a professionally built show car? No.

Should you do this to the old beater VW Beetle you have out back? Sure!
What about the $500 car you just bought for your son or daughter? Perfect!!!

Please, read this write up in its entirety and ask any questions you may have before jumping into the project. I would reccommend trying this on a test piece such as an old fender or maybe even your lawn mower before attempting to paint your car with this method.

With all of that being said, please take a look at the picture below. As you can see the final result yielded some brush strokes. That is about as bad as any of the spots where you can see the brush strokes. A small price to pay for a $75.00 paint job!


wow it LOOKS great
Thank you!
That's a nice Beretta you have there :)
Why thank you!
not a poor man, a thrifty man
<p>I went with the high density roller brush and a mix of two thirds Lowe's brand of Rustoleum and one third mineral spirits. First time I did this the job lasted three years. This time here is after one coat. It never stayed shiny the first time. I'm wondering if I should add something for a) a shell-seal or b) a shine.</p>
Thank you for the wonderdul article! I just finished the 4th layer of paint in my car with rustuleum, I couldnt find the high gloss paint in Home Depot, so I got generic gloss white paint instead. I sanded the car before painting but I did not sand in between layers. I'm wondering if it's still worth sanding the car with a 1000 paper now that I'm happy with the even coating. I'm afraid that sanding now might mean I'll have to do a 5th coat. Also, do you think it would be helpful to do a clear coat if I don't sand it? Thank you again!
If you're happy with how it looks now I wouldn't mess with it. But I would put on a clear coat to help keep it looking good longer.
What 's so different about using a brush or roller. As long as you apply the paint at the same Timerate you will get the same results using a brush or roller.
I found that the roller applied too much paint at once, leading to the need to sand heavily between coats. With the brush you get a lot more control of how much paint is applied and where.
I'm going to Walmart right now
When I was 17 I painted my whole car with white out sharpies and paint markers.
<p>When you say &quot;two coats in a warm day&quot; how warm is warm? I live in AZ and what I'm used to as a warm day may be different than yours. Thx.</p>
Colorado warm... 70* or more. Part of the key of this paint process is to not paint in direct sunlight as it will cause the paint to dry too quickly. If you're in a smokin' state such as Arizona you'll definitely want to do your painting in a well shaded area.
<p>thanks for an awesome tutorial!! I am looking at a tacoma pickup truck that would need the hood and roof painted at a minimum but currently being in Guam for the next 3 years I don't want to put the money into a professional paint job just to have it ruined by the weather here, I will definitely be doing this as a temporary solution!</p>
<p>I was wondering if you would suggest a different paint that the oil-based one as they are restricted in Europe and theres no way to buy them. I cant buy them in the states either as they are flammable and therefore not allowed to be shipped.</p><p>Would be great to hear back from you as I want to get my hands dirty :)</p>
I have no experience with any other paints so sadly I cannot recommend another paint or brand for you. I'm sure a local paint store can assist you with this question.
This guy uses rustoleum professional series spray paint. Looks totally wicked. https://youtu.be/dZr560JW5Ck
<p>I was wondering if you would suggest a different paint that the oil-based one as they are restricted in Europe and theres no way to buy them. I cant buy them in the states either as they are flammable and therefore not allowed to be shipped.</p><p>Would be great to hear back from you as I want to get my hands dirty :)</p>
<p>I just sprayed my 94 Plymouth voyager with this same white gloss, sprayer, compressor etc, it came out perfect, was a lot of sanding, but we'll worth, perfect work van</p>
How long was this process?
After it was all said and done I had about 10 days worth of work or a total of 40 hours into this job. People argue that you can get a real paint job at a shop in a day or two but again, the work behind this process is what makes it so rewarding!
Looks fantastic! You want to paint my car. I'll buy all materials and pay you labor costs!
<p>Great job!!! Who would think you could get that good of results with a foam brush. It's also great that your sharing this information. How is the paint holding up looks like it's been awhile since you did this </p>
To be honest it seems the paint has a shelf life of about 2 to 3 years. I'm sure with more intensive prep and care in initial application it could last closer to 5. Again, it's all in the prep work and the details.
<p>I have a1991 Chevy s10 that I would like to paint. There is excessive spots were the base metal is showing and the paint is completely chipped away. From your articles your car had some paint on it. What would you recommend for me to do? Would your method still work if I were to sand it completely down to the base metal for the entire body. Please let me know what you think. Thanks </p>
I am not a professional painter of any kind, please keep that in mind as you read my answer/suggestion. I'd say taking it down to the metal would be your best bet for a nice even end result. Otherwise you'll have ridges/edges where the paint was still on the car. You can try to avoid this by sanding down only the edges of the paint chips in an effort to smooth it to the metal. If you sand all the way to the metal you may want to research and see if there is anything you then need to do before paint. Also, don't let the bare metal get wet too often! Paint right away to avoid rust and what not.
<p>Or maybe fill the low spots with primer to bring flush...</p>
<p>what is &quot;Rustoleum high gloss white paint&quot;? They don't make anything called that. Is it a spray paint? &quot;Quarts&quot; suggests cans not spray. Is this a primer?</p>
<p>Rustoleum high gloss white paint is just as it says; it is a high gloss white paint made by Rustoleum. And yes, it is in quart sized cans. Are you in Canada? Apparently Rustoleum is called something different in Canada. Here's a link to what I used:<br><a href="http://www.homedepot.com/p/Rust-Oleum-Stops-Rust-1-qt-Gloss-White-Protective-Enamel-Paint-7792504/100117230" rel="nofollow">http://www.homedepot.com/p/Rust-Oleum-Stops-Rust-1...</a><br><br>I see they do have a primer as well, but it requires the car to be down to the bare metal. I'm sure you could use one of their spray primers if you wanted to as along as the original surface was prepared properly. </p>
<p>Sorry, they make a gazillion different paints including spray paints<br> and automotive paints for sprayers. I think they also own half the<br> paint manufacturers in the US now. Yes I'm in US.</p><p><br> <br><br> What you mean is called Rust-oleum STOPS RUST&reg; Protective Enamel<strong><br> - </strong>Gloss White #7792504:<br> <a href="http://www.rustoleum.com/product-catalog/consumer-brands/stops-rust/protective-enamel" rel="nofollow">http://www.rustoleum.com/product-catalog/consumer-brands/stops-rust/protective-enamel</a>. <br> I couldn't get to the link you sent, but I'm surmising that from the Paint Your Car with Rustoleum instructables, which has a<br> photo of the can.<br><br> <br><br> Anyway, thanks for the fantastic web page and especially the<br> multi-year updates. I'm gonna try it on my pickup.<br><br> <br><br> A couple of questions - did you do any of the painting outdoors? <br> Any experience with that you can share? Problems with drying too<br> fast or wind or bugs?<br><br> <br><br> Also, did you have to deal with any rusty spots, and has any rust<br> returned under the new paint?<br></p>
<p>Great questions! I should probably edit these answers into the write up as they are rather pertinent to the process. Yes I painted a few coats outside. This isn't really advisable unless you are positive it won't rain and there won't be any wind. Imagine a nice fresh coat on the car and the wind kicking the field next to you all over it. Temperature can play a factor as well. A hot car (the metal) will cause the paint to dry too quickly and therefore have brush lines. And yes, I did have a small bug or two land in my fresh paint. Just leave it! The more you pick at it and try to get it out the more you'll just mess up the paint. If it's just gently stuck to the paint it will just rub off easily once it is dry. Little bugs anyway like gnats and such. As for rust? I had none. I would simply suggest sanding off all the rust you can, treating it with a primer of some kind and then painting it. </p>
<p>thank you for the excellent tutorial.</p><p>Question about the bumpers. You took your bumpers off to paint. I'm considering painting my car and see my bumpers have a plastic around them the same color as the car. Should I paint these with the rustoleum? do I need to prime first? </p><p>Do you have any additional tips about painting these non-metalic parts of the car?</p>
<p>I'm sorry I never replied! I think this question would revolve around just how porous the plastic material on your bumpers is. Is it pretty solid/flat? If so I would think you may be able to paint it just like you do the rest of the car. Perhaps try a test spot to see how well it adheres. My only other tip would be to primer the plastic to help make sure the paint adheres well. </p>
thank you for your reply.<br><br>
<p>I have used Rustoleum for other outdoor jobs and noticed that the UV rays of the sun fade the color pretty quickly. So while this may work for white paint, I'd be leery of using colors.</p>
<p>Remember, this isn't necessarily an end all solution as much as it is a cheap and easy &quot;fix&quot;. And who knows, maybe the fade will look good?</p>
Can you do this to a silver car to a black car??
<p>Sorry for the delay! Yes, you can use this method to change any color to another color. It will just take a few more coats to ensure good coverage of the prior color. </p>
<p>It looks great! Thank you for posting this informative write-up - now I know what my 2016 summer project is :)</p>
<p>Great idea, it really does look great! I've only ever heard of using a sprayer with Rustoleum. Would you say this &quot;poor man's method&quot; is easier? I've been wanting to repaint my car. I totally agree with the other comments though... It's not a POOR man's paint method...it's a THRIFTY man's method!</p><p><a href="http://www.a1roadlines.com.au/productsandservices/Attenuators/truckmountedattenuators" rel="nofollow">http://www.a1roadlines.com.au/productsandservices/Attenuators/truckmountedattenuators</a></p>
I haven't ever used a sprayer, at all... but I would think that is easier than this time wise. I would think you would spend more time taping everything up than you do actually spraying. This was my way of getting around spraying as I didn't have a place to do it, sprayer, knowledge, etc.
So I have a Nissan d21 and the paint is faded and down to metal in some places it was a work hunting truck but I want to go from the Greyish blue that it is now to blue what would be better light blue or dark and how much would I need to sand
I can't really comment on what color would be better save for to say that lighter colors will hide imperfections in the paint better. Sanding depends on your paint's condition. Your first sand you might want to take some time and do well as it is the base layer then for the first coat of paint. Imperfection in your sanding from the get go will show in every paint layer after that.
<p>you're a lifesaver. I was following the paint roller / hair dryer method and omgaaawd it's sooooo tedius. I did three coats with the roller, then noticed your foam brush tutorial. Tried it not thinking I'd be able to do it because I'm not the greatest painter lol. Needless to say, you've made my life 10x easier on the final few coats, and it looks alot better. Little to no orange peel and it goes so much faster then having to follow your roller with the hair dryer the entire time. You da man.</p>

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