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From using desoldering irons to sketchily knocking breadboard components off on the side of a table, there are tons of ways to remove components from a circuit board. Desoldering is an important skill to learn once you've gotten the hang of soldering, because messing up a soldering job isn't improbable.

The basic concept of desoldering is very simple: you need to heat up the solder, then you need to figure out how to get the component or wires out nicely, and then you need to clean up all the solder still attached to the board and/or the component. In this guide you'll learn many of the diverse methods used to desolder through-hole components, from the nice, clean techniques to the last resort, end of the world schemes to get your desperately needed components back. If you have any other desoldering methods, please comment!

Step 1: How to Use a Soldering Iron to Desolder

If all you have is a soldering iron, then your only option is to heat up the solder and fiddle with it until you can get the components out. Here's what you can do:

1. Heat up the solder with the iron.

2. Slide the iron up the pins to bring the majority of the solder away from the joint.

2. Using pliers, gently pull at the components to remove their pins from the pin holes while they are still hot. It's a good idea to pull by their leads as opposed to on the components themselves to maintain the quality of the component.

Tip (edit): If you need to get excess solder out of holes, try sticking something like a safety pin or needle through to clear out the through-holes. Using the tip of the soldering iron will remove the copper plating from the PCB.

Pros: You need nothing but a soldering iron, and the components can be reused.

Cons: You may damage the board if you leave the soldering iron on it for too long.

Step 2: How to Use Desoldering Braid

Desoldering braid, or solder wick, is a nice desoldering method used to essentially soak up unwanted solder. It comes in a coil of braided together strands of wire. Because copper conducts heat well, and solder is attracted to heat, by heating up the braid you can draw the solder off your part and into the braid. Some desolering braid comes with flux within it, which makes it much easier and cleaner to remove a part. If your soldering braid does not contain flux, then you can apply it by dipping the section of the braid you will use into the flux. Here's how to use it:

1. Unwind a few inches of braid from the coil.

2. If your solder wick does not have flux on it, it would be a good idea to add flux to the section you are going to use to make for a clean removal.

3. Place the braid over the joint you want to rework.

4. Place a hot soldering iron against the braid and desired pin.

5. Wait a few seconds. The solder will flow off the pin and onto the braid.

6. Remove the braid. The braid will be very hot at this point, so make sure not to touch the braid itself, only the spool.

7. Remove the component.

8. Repeat steps 1-5 to remove excess solder.

Tip: Use a pair of needle-nose pliers to position and hold down the braid without getting burned.

Pros: It's cheap and easy to use, and comes in various sizes depending on the magnitude of the solder you want to remove. Desoldering braid is great for removing solder from flat surfaces. Removed components can be reused.

Cons: Desoldering braid isn't reusable, you'll want to start with a clean segment of braid each time you use it. Because it gets so hot, it can be tough to reposition once you've started. It's also pretty hard to get solder out of pin holes.

Step 3: How to Use a Desoldering Pump

One of the nicest ways to desolder a component involves using a desoldering pump. A desoldering pump is essentially a small, high pressure vacuum. After heating up the solder, you can use the desoldering pump to suck the solder up and out of the way. Here are the basic steps for using a hand-powered desoldering pump:

1. Heat up the solder you want to remove with a soldering iron (some desoldering pumps also come with attached irons).

2. Press down on the plunger (If your pump has a bulb, just squeeze the bulb).

3. Once the solder is molten, place the tip of the desoldering pump against the solder that you want to remove.

4. Release the plunger or bulb. Some desoldering pumps have a release button so that you don't have to hold it the whole time.

5. Remove free component.

6. Repeat steps 1-4 to remove any excess solder.

7. Dispose of the solder inside the pump by repeatedly pressing down and releasing the plunger.

Tip: If you are trying to remove excess bits of solder, you may want to add more solder to the joint, because the solder will stay liquid for longer when in larger "blobs", and thus be easier to remove.

Pros: Desoldering pumps come in a wide range of styles, from handheld pumps to electronic, heated guns that require no iron to use. They are great for reworking small parts and getting solder out of pin holes. Removed components can be reused.

Cons: Although the pumps can have small tips, they are large in general and may be hard to get into very tight spaces.

Step 4: How to Use a Heat Gun to Desolder

Using a heat gun is another way to remove solder without the use of a soldering iron. Basically, it heats up the solder enough to be able to remove the components. Using a hot air station is a slightly more professional and expensive way of doing this, as it is basically a heat gun specifically meant for desoldering. If you don't have one of those though, here's how you can use a heat gun to desolder components:

1. Turn on the heat gun.

2. Use pliers to hold the circuit board above the air streaTim.

3. Use a pair of needle nose pliers to pull the component out of the board.

Tip: You only need to heat gun the board for a few seconds, or else you will melt the copper plating on the PCB and damage the board, as shown in the picture.

Pros: Simple and quick way to get a component out of a PCB without a soldering iron. The components may be reused, depending on the damage done.

Cons: It can get very, very hot. The board itself heats up pretty quickly, and you can damage it or your fingers pretty badly if you aren't careful. The components and/or the board may not be salvageable.

Step 5: How to Use Compressed Air to Desolder (Method 1)

If you don't have access to some of the tools I mentioned previously, there are a couple other neat ways to remove components if you desperately need them, and using a compressed air can is one of them. You can use it to remove solder from your component by simply blasting molten solder away. Here's how:

WARNING: If you are going to do this, you must wear safety glasses. This method sends chunks of molten solder flying everywhere.

1. Heat up the solder with a soldering iron.

2. Once the solder is molten, get the nose of the compressed air can or gun up close to the joint.

3. Blast it with air, with the nozzle pointing away from you.

Tip: Because the air can is pretty powerful, you can heat up solder stuck in pin holes and blast it out

Pros: It's fun, messy, quick, and who doesn't love playing with compressed air? Also, the removed components can be reused.

Cons: It's messy, so solder may get all over your workspace and circuit board if you aren't careful with your aim. This is why you need safety glasses.

Step 6: How to Use Compressed Air to Desolder (Method 2)

Don't have access to a soldering iron? That's ok! You can use a compressed air in another neat (but more aggressive) way to remove soldered components. When you turn a compressed air can upside-down, it sprays out a freezing cold liquid solvent. This super-cools the solder, making it extremely brittle. Here's what you can do:

1. Turn the compressed air car upside-down.

2. Spray it against the joints. Parts of the board (top and bottom) will turn while, but after a few seconds it will return to normal.

3. Wrench the components off with pliers.

Tip: If you don't have pliers, you can knock the components off using the edge of a table.

Pros: You don't need a soldering iron, and you get to see what happens when you turn an air can upside-down! This process is also the only one that isn't very hot.

Cons: Components cannot always be salvaged.

Step 7: Experiment and Explore!

Desoldering can be pretty tricky business, and many people have come up with their own techniques to cleanly removing their components from a circuit board. This instructable only covered how to remove through-hole components, but there are many other ways to desolder other types of circuits. If you have any other desoldering methods you'd like to share, please add them in the comments!

<p>1. Go into Mordor</p><p>2. Drop board into Mount Doom</p><p>3. Desoldered!</p>
<p>One way to clean boards from residual solder is to heat the board until the solder turns liquid and quickly wipe the board with a cloth.it removes almost 95 percent of the solder from the boards leaving them ready for your projects.</p>
<p>I was removing a few components yesterday and couldn't find my pump. After the components were removed the holes had some solder in so I couldn't replace them so I got a safety pin, heated the hole and pushed the pin through wiggling it as the solder set. Result- holes for the replacement parts. (If you do this try use a safety pin- they're longer than pins or needles so you're less likely to get burned. Also the metal is much more ductile so will bend rather than snap and splinter).</p>
<p>A splinter from a toothpick works well. Solder can't stick to it, it doesn't sink away much heat. and if you accidentally move to the side, the splinter will break instead of damaging the board.</p>
Yes,but that only works on the larger leads- they are too big for low wattage resistors etc where they don't pass fully though the hole.
<p>I use this method most often, but only when the board is not going to be kept. Sometimes it's better to remove some of the more sensitive components (provided you want to salvage them) using a more precise method. After that, I like to heat it until it starts to bow, help it out a bit (flex it using pliers), and watch with a mad scientist's grin as parts virtually fly off the board (into a 1/2 hotel pan I've got nearby just for this).</p><p>Similar to this method, I've used an electric griddle with less destructive success. Separate the board from the griddle with foil, heat &amp; serve. Not really serve, grab some tweezers or needle nose pliers and start plucking parts off.</p>
<p>I like the gridle idea. I must give it a try.. Thanks</p>
<p>Just like with the heat gun you have a very small window from &quot;just hot enough to pull parts in tact&quot; to &quot;solder soup garnished with plastic lumps&quot;. Best to be expedient in other words.</p>
<p>Thanks for tha tip. I'll try it out on an old junk board I have first.</p>
<p>Thanks for the detailed explanations of each method. I have used all these methods in the past when I was a repair technician, except the compressed air blowing method. We did have a compressed air desoldering tool, but it sucked the solder instead of blowing it.</p><p>My advice would be to avoid this blowing method. Besides the danger of flying molten lead, on a populated board, it can cause hairline shorts. If you don't locate and clear them, you have another round of fault-finding to do. Your moving clip clearly shows how far the solder flies and how fine the solder strands are.</p><p>I would also like to add another interesting tool that is a great help in soldering/desoldering. I got this from a visiting Japanese technician. He always had a couple of <strong>bamboo sticks</strong> on his workbench. He used the pointed tip for cleaning out the flux and checking for solder bridges after soldering, without scratching the board. He also used it for clearing the holes after desoldering. More details in my instructable: <a href="https://www.instructables.com/id/Portable-Variable-Voltage-Power-Supply/" rel="nofollow">https://www.instructables.com/id/Portable-Variable-Voltage-Power-Supply/</a></p><p>I improved on the bamboo stick by filing a wedge at the other end. After you desolder a component it is difficult to get all the old solder off and flatten the pad surface (necessary especially for SMD components). Here is how you do it. Hold the board steady in a vice, hold the wedge just behind the soldering iron on the copper pad. When the solder melts, sweep the stick towards the iron. You'll be surprised how clean the pad looks! If you don't succeed the first time, apply some solder and try again. For ICs - one pin at a time.</p><p>Also remember when desoldering by any of the methods, always apply additional solder first. The flux in the new solder helps the old solder flow better.</p><p>By the way, if you are having trouble finding bamboo sticks in your area, check out Chinese stores or restaurants.</p>
<p>Does anyone know about Chipquick? It is a low-temperature solder. You apply it to the joint, and the melting point of the solder in the joint is lowered so much it stays molten &quot;forever&quot;. This is handy for elaborate repairs on dense surface-mount boards. On a large IC with lots of leads, you apply this to all the leads with an iron, then gentle heat-gun heat releases the IC. Then you clean up with a solder sucker or braid, and solder in the new IC.</p>
<p>Awesome! Thanks for the tips!</p>
<p>very useful</p>
<p>I'd like to add a few friendly additions to your techniques (from one that is a practicing electronics engineer for a long time....).</p><p>1) for the soldering iron approach, it would be better to grab the LEADS of the component with the long nose pliers for two reasons: a) pliers act as a heat sink so one does not destroy the device, b) leads have better structural integrity.</p><p>2) in situation where you are using a solder sucker, if there is not much solder on the joint, it is often helpful to ADD a little solder to the joint, then use the solder sucker. Usually makes for a cleaner extraction.</p><p>3) when using the solderwick, add some flux to the wick - it helps with the wicking action as copper will oxidize, reducing the absorption</p><p>You might want to reference the NASA publication that describes in detail proper soldering and desoldering techniques. The pub number escapes me ATM, but it has been standard reading for both EEs and techs doing bench work.</p><p>4) Removal of components that are sensitive to heat, e.g. transistors, scr, IC.s etc.it is a good idea to use a heat sink clip on the leads. </p><p>5) Generally NOT a good idea to put the iron THROUGH the holes. Maybe back in the 1960s when copper traces and PTH were THICK. Now adays traces are VERY THIN, you will certainty lift the copper off the board if you try that. Put some solder in the hole and use the solder sucker. You will get a nice clean hole.</p><p>You don't mention it, but heating the component lead (which usually has more mass) is preferred first, then move to the PCB trace. That will reduce the risk of extracting the plated through hole (PTH) when you remove the component. (That is, of course assuming you want to reuse the board.</p><p>Just an observation, the heat gun approach is very good for removing components en mass but...IF one wants to preserve the board, gradual heating is recommended as compared to your pic where the board was incinerated...</p>
<p>Wow, thanks for all the info! I'll definitely add some of this in to make the guide a bit better and more comprehensive.</p>
<p>I've used a small butane torch on the back side of a board to remove multi lead components. I put the board in a vise vertically and pull on the component with a pliers while playing the butane flame over the joints. By moving the flame across all the joints repeatedly they're heated uniformly and the component usually releases before it's overheated.</p>
<p>This is way too dangerous, even if protective gear is used - I can't imagine any situation so extreme that I would resort to this.</p>
In step 1 for using just a soldering iron, you mention putting the iron tip through holes to clear them. While this is easy and fast, I've noticed a few times that PTH holes lose the connection between the top and bottom layer due to the tip scraping away the PTH coating. So remember to solder the component on both sides after this method if it was a PTH hole. Nice instructable and I've learned a few new tricks.
<p>My additions would be:</p><p>1. Using a syringe needle of appropriate size: get the syringe needle around the leg of the component and isolate the liquid solder from the leg, then let cool. Can be used to remove components with the number of legs approaching infinity (e.g. chips).<br>2. Easing a scalpel or some other kind of blade under the legs of SMD components, for example SOT-223 transistors while the solder is liquid. Wire hooks can also be used.<br>3. I once cut off the legs of a burnt-out LNK304 chip and then pulled the legs out from the board with pliers. It is an extremely vulgar and violent way, but I replaced the chip and it worked (it was part of a washing machine's main board 5 and 12V power supply).<br><br>I have worked in a home appliance repair workshop and these three are of course cutting edge proffesional techniques.<br><br>P.S. A comment about braids: I use stranded wire with a lot of thin strands. I dip it into flux and use some additional maneuvers to suck of solder in the order of magnitude of kilograms per day.</p>
<p>Step one should be to cut all leads unless you MUST save the part. Much easier to remove a single lead. Boards are hard to repair, components are cheap. Step two is incorrect. Leave or even add more solder. The more solder you have, the longer it will stay liquid and the easier it will be to remove the lead.</p>
Thanks! Which method is this referring to?
One thing missing from your desoldering braid section is the use of flux. Wipe some flux on the board at the component, then put the (partially pulled apart) braid over the component. When you apply the soldering iron to the braid, the flux allows quick and clean removal of the solder.
<p>I was about to comment about that. I usually off to the side, put flux directly on the braid. </p>
<p>Thanks guys! I'm used to using soldering braid with flux--I'll make sure I add it in.</p>
<p>RE: Step 5. Another &quot;CON&quot; is that you don't know which direction the molten solder will fly -- to include back at YOU. Be certain to wear protective eyewear.</p>
<p>The heat-and-whack method is usually my first choice, because although I have 5 or 6 solder suckers I can never find them. Braid (with some flux) is better for getting ICs off. </p>
<p>You have burnt that PCB.</p>
<p>Yep, I wanted to show what would happen if you left the heat on the board for too long. </p>
<p>This is a terrible idea. Never do this.. You don't want flakes of solder flying around the room.. </p>
<p>In step 4 you could perhaps also mention the hot air station. Perhaps not everyone has access to one because it can be on the expensive side, but that is probably the most efficient and least damaging way of using hot air to remove soldered components.</p>
<p>Thanks! I'll put a note in about it.</p>
I am making a Invention prototype for the 4th time. I know nothing about ohms, currency, mainly current flow. Your site is the best.
<p>thanks. i do...</p>
<p>I personally prefer soldering braid. It is fairly quick and easy and does a reasonable job at removing solder. And it is very cheap at around $1 per meter. Anyway great list! </p>
<p>Plunger type desoldering pumps first came out in the '60's and did not have stem guards, I came close to smashing my eye more than once, usually just smacking my nose or eyebrow. Dangerous things, I would not use any without the plunger guard or sheath, it's too easy to focus on the target and forget about the resultant stabbing action thanks to tunnel vision effect.</p><p>Also too, I do use the airgun method; be advised blow-back of molten solder is a danger, at a minimum use eye protection but better yet a full face shield is preferred.</p><p><strong>CON</strong>: always wear eye protection when soldering- period!</p>
my favorite is using a solder bulb / plunger. it is cheap and effective. of course given the opportunity I would take a desoldering iron any day.

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Bio: My name is Alex Crease, and I'm an engineer, a musician, and an adventurer. I love building things and taking others apart to see ... More »
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