Instructables

Three-Way and Four-Way Switches--How They Work

Step 3: The Light Comes "On" Again

Picture of The Light Comes
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Someone enters the same room near the switch at the right of the graphic. He or she flips that switch. Now there is again a pathway for the electricity. This time it flows over the second of the two wires running between the switches.

When you encounter what was supposed to be a three-way circuit, and you can turn it "on" at one of the switches, but not at the other switch, unless the first switch is already "on," the problem is usually that one of the wires going into the switch is on a terminal for one of the two wires going out of the switch.

Not all three-way switches are the same, either. All of them have two screws on one side of the switch and one screw on the other side. But, the screws for the wires running between the switches may be on the same side of the switch, or they may be on opposite sides of the switch at the same end of the switch. You cannot make assumptions. It is not uncommon to find that one switch in a three-way circuit uses one arrangement, but the other is from a different manufacturer and uses a different pattern for the screws.

If you have a continuity tester, you can shut "off" the circuit breaker and test the switch to determine which screw connects to what.

I helped a friend at his vacation home. He had a three-way switch at the top and bottom of a stairway. Since the time the home was built thirty years ago he has had to turn the switch at the bottom of the stairway "on" first. Then he could turn the light "off" or "on" from the top of the stairway where the bedrooms are. If the switch at the bottom of the stairway was "off," he could not turn the light "on" from the top of the stairway. The problem was what I mentioned above. The wire going into one of the switches was on a screw terminal for one of the wires going between the switches. In this case, I did not have any meters or testers, but had to reason out the problem. I got it solved in about ten minutes. He is happy now because his three-way circuit works as it should.

See the second image. This is an update. I discovered an exception to the rule that three-way circuit problems are due to two wires transposed into each other's place. The photo shows a dimmer switch that can be used as a single-pole switch or as a three-way switch. These switches fail in time due to overheating. When they do, the switch may work when the toggle is up or down, but not in both positions. This can make you think two wires are in each other's place, but the switch simply needs to be replaced. A continuity tester does not work on one of these switches. If you find one on a three-way circuit that is not working, just replace the switch and your problems will likely be solved.
 
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