Introduction: Tippmann 98 Custom: Polishing Internals

Picture of Tippmann 98 Custom: Polishing Internals

A quick guide on how to polish the internal mechanism of a Tippmann 98 Custom paintball marker.

WARNING: I am not to be held responsible for any damage caused to your marker or any other marker this method or any similar method is used on. (Even though I highly doubt you can cause real harm to your marker, even if you did this for hours on end)

Step 1: Disassembly of the Marker

Picture of Disassembly of the Marker

Disassembly of the 98 custom is very easy. this is made possible by the "Clam-Shell" design. All you do is remove the 6 bolts on the side with the charging handle and loosen the bolts on the ASA.
(Sorry for not including pics of disassembly, but it's pretty easy)

You need these following tools for the entire process:

1/8 inch hex key (mine is in a set)
Flat-Head screwdriver (only if you have a response trigger/cyclone feed/both (like me))
Pliers of some sort (only for removing response trigger)
Steel Wool (I used extra fine)
Tippmann 98 custom (durrr)

Step 2: Further Disassembly

Picture of Further Disassembly

Now you must remove all the pins, springs and valves inside the marker, the "meat" if you will. This requires that you unhook all of your upgrades (Cyclone Feed, Response Trigger, etc.) and unscrew the two round bolts on the opposite side of the marker. This will make it so that you can take the valve system out of the marker. You should be left with something like the image below.

Step 3: Gettin' Down 'n Dirty

Picture of Gettin' Down 'n Dirty

Not really....
First you must remove all lubricants and such from the insides to make polishing a lot easier. That and its good to clean your marker after every time you play by opening it up and giving it a good scrub with the rough side of a wet sponge. Your marker will thank you!

Step 4: Now for the Fun!

Picture of Now for the Fun!

It's finally time to rigorously scrub the inside of the marker with your steel wool!

The areas you really have to get are:

The rear-section of the marker where the hammer has to slide back and fourth a bajillion times.

The front section of the marker where your paint feeds in so that the little plastic piece that has to slide a bajillion times as well has less trouble.

Polishing these areas with the steel wool will increase the air efficiency and speed of your marker.

Step 5: More Fun!

Picture of More Fun!

It also helps to polish the hammer as well. Just make sure not to hit the O-Ring on it, you may damage it and need to spend an extra $5 on an O-Ring kit.

You must first disassemble the hammer by taking out the charging handle and taking out the small plastic spring guide inside by coaxing it out with your screwdriver or just shaking it out.

It also helps to clean the hammer before hand.

Step 6: The Result

Picture of The Result

The result of all your hard toil is a beautiful, shiny, smooth marker.

Look at that shine!

Also, small pieces of steel wool may accumulate on the inside of the marker. Clean these out with a good rinse of water.

Step 7: Reassembly

Picture of Reassembly

Now you get to put your marker back together just the way you took it apart. Also you get to put back on what fixin's u have installed (Cyclone Feed/Response Trigger/Etc.)

Step 8: Lubricating Properly

Picture of Lubricating Properly

It is important to lubricate your marker in the right areas and with the right kind of lubricant.

If your marker came with a small bottle of lubricant, by all means, use that.

If it did not come with any, i suggest using a pneumatic tool lubricant, it's not petroleum based (so it won't corrode O-Rings) and lets face it, a paintball marker is a nail gun that shoots balls filled with goo.

You must lubricate:

The chamber around the hammer.

The hammer itself.

The front plastic piece (and around it)

And it helps to keep your valve system nice and clean by putting a few drops of lubricant through the ASA into the air lines and shoot a few times with air in the system.

Step 9: End

Picture of End

Now, have some fun. Attach your barrel, load up some paintballs and make sure everything is running smoothly. And take some target practice (if you have an area to do that).

Congratulations on increasing the air-efficiency and reliability of your Tippmann 98 Custom!

Comments

aarroyo2 (author)2015-01-12

Nice but one issue, Never apply oil on or in the asa it can lead to oil getting into your co2 tank and causing a nasty explosion that can seriously hurt or even kill you. look it up on youtube

robot797 (author)aarroyo22016-10-15

co2?
the tank contains high pressure air
but you are right about the exploding

rexferal (author)2012-09-01

i finished mine off by wet sanding with 2000 grit sand paper .

ry25920 (author)2009-05-05

Good job... But it's a tipmann. Polishing the interior does aid proformance, but isn't needed.

rexferal (author)ry259202012-09-01

I believe it may do more for preserving o-rings, i noticed it closed velocity deviation on the paintballs by about 15 fps. That could also be caused by different weather on the testing days.

I didn't even notice an improvement, I mean yeah, it's a slicker surface now, but in terms of on the field, noticable change in performance? meh

ilpug (author)2012-05-02

Nice idea, but two things: include an exploded diagram of the gun, so people might have an idea of how to dis/reassemble it. Is there any real benefit to polishing the internals? These are some of the most reliable guns ever, so is this really needed?

abadfart (author)2009-06-04

when taking apart mine the trigger ecumenism popped out before i got a good look at is can some one send me a diagram

bmr321 (author)Clero2011-08-31

problem ith that is that it wasnt a 98c :( duh thats a m98 theres a difrence

abadfart (author)Clero2009-06-11

thanks that was great

Fried Noodles (author)2011-04-03

thanks i am so doing this to my project salvo.

About This Instructable

28,496views

18favorites

License:

More by LaBeAsT418:Tippmann 98 Custom: Polishing Internals
Add instructable to: