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This is a giant ball made from three intersecting semi truck tires.

It has no real purpose other than being a yard sculpture, but it might make a great play thing for your pet tiger!

The idea came from an acquaintance of mine who has made several of these, and I liked the idea so much that I decided to take a crack at it. I used a different approach and construction method than he did, but the end result looks essentially the same.

If you're in the mood to make a funky piece of recycled yard art, or you've just got a strong desire to abuse some power tools, this might be a great project for you!

I'll show you how I made this tireball, and share some useful tips on cutting tires along the way.

Step 1: Tools and Materials

If you've ever tried to cut up an old tire, you know how frustratingly difficult it is.

I've seen people cut up tires with angle grinders and even circular saws, but that seems to produce a lot of molten rubber and nasty smoke. I went a different route and used primarily a reciprocating saw.

For me, this project required a fair amount of planning and carefully laying things out, but the majority of the time and effort was spent actually cutting the tires.

Here are the tools and materials I used:

  • Three large tires
  • Non-wimpy corded drill
  • Non-wimpy reciprocating saw (this is the one I have)
  • Large pile of reciprocating saw blades (6-inch variety)
  • Jigsaw
  • Band saw (optional, but very useful)
  • Cordless drill/drivers
  • Sawhorses (I recommend making a some of these)
  • Two 8-foot 2x4s and about 12 feet of 2x8
  • Various screws

A few thoughts on reciprocating saw blades . . . I found no huge performance differences between a variety of blades I tried. Cutting the tires required more physical force than most people would consider appropriate to exert with a power tool (read: dangerous and abusive use of the tool). I think the only requisite features for blades are sharp teeth moving fast!

Step 2: Get Some Tires

I went down to one of my local tire stores and asked if they ever give away old tires "for free to artists."

(I do not consider myself an artist . . . but I've learned that if you throw that out there, people don't ask as many questions. Plus, they will tend to give away their garbage more freely. Perhaps they're subconsciously trying to "support the arts.")

Anyway, they said "absolutely, help yourself" and showed me to the to-be-recycled pile.

I picked out three semi truck tires that were the same size, loaded them into my truck, and took them to a self-serve car wash for a cleaning.

Step 3: Mark to Remove the Beads

For this project, I decided it would be A LOT easier if I first removed the beads from each tire. The "bead" is the thick, inner-most part of the tire that has a large steel cable running through it.

I made a simple marking jig out of some scraps to hold a marker about three inches away from the inside edge of the tire, and marked all of the tires.

Step 4: How to Cut Tires

Cutting through the sidewalls is much easier than cutting through the treads. However, this same basic technique was used for making all cuts.

For every cut, I began by creating a hole in which to start the blade. This was done by drilling two holes with a 3/8 inch bit very close together on the line to be cut. I then drilled back through one of them at an angle into the other hole, and applied sideways pressure with the drill so the bit would cut laterally through the material between and join the two holes.

I was able to just insert the saw blade through this hole for many of the cuts, and off I'd go. However for some cuts, I had to make a sort of plunge cut into the hole to get the blade through it.

To do this hole-assisted plunge cut, I would rest the foot of the saw onto the tire with the blade parallel to the wall of the tire. With the blade tip positioned over the drilled hole, I would start the motor and hold the saw firmly while I gently tipped it forward until the blade began to cut at the hole. Then I would tip it all the way in.

I would then stop the saw, leaving the blade in the tire, and reposition myself behind the saw as shown in photo 2.

Cuts were then be made by pushing the saw from behind, working slowing and following the line marked previously. For cuts through the treads, tires were positioned so I could push the saw downward from above.

If you're going to try this, be aware that it takes much more physical effort than you may suspect. However, a little trial and error will show you the amount of force needed to cut through a tire.

Step 5: Remove the Beads

Using the technique outlined in the previous step, I removed the beads from all three tires.

Step 6: Tire Ball Assembly Diagram

Here are a couple of diagrams to show how I cut up the tires, and how they fit together.

The other tireballs I've seen started with one whole tire that had two half-tires fastened to it, and then four quarter-tires fastened to that.

I like this intersecting version because every visible section is a complete half-tire, which results in a tireball that is completely symmetrical-looking.

Step 7: Create a Template

Based on my assembly plan, I created a template on some scrap 1/4" MDF to use as a marking guide for where to make the needed cuts on all of the tires. See photo notes for details.

If you want to make your own tireball, it is important to make a precise plan and template like this to match the size and shape of the tires you're using.

Step 8: Cut Out Template . . . and a Have a Fun Side Project!

After laying out the template I began cutting it out with my trusty jigsaw.

But then my jigsaw died!

Of all the tools I figured I'd kill with this project, I did not suspect it would be this one . . . and while cutting out thin MDF, no less!

Rather than buy a new one, I did some research and ended up ordering a few internal parts to fix it myself. A week and a new speed governor and main switch later, I was back in business!

Step 9: Mark the Tires

With a can of spray paint and the template, I marked the areas on the tires that were to be removed.

Step 10: Make All the Cuts

Using the techniques outlined in step 4, I cut up the three tires as needed based on the diagrams in step 6.

Step 11: Finished Cuts

Here are the tires with all the necessary cuts completed.

Step 12: A Few Ruined Blades

I only went through six blades. Only six!

Step 13: Prepare Wooden Internal Supports

The tires were too floppy to hold themselves together as they were, and needed some kind of internal support. Wooden blocks and braces were made and attached to the tires, both to hold them rigid and also to provide something to screw the various parts to.

These supports were cut out of pieces of 2x4 and 2x8, to be added to the tires as shown in photo 1.

Step 14: Attach Support Blocks and Braces

The various blocks and braces were attached to the tires with 1 5/8" decking screws.

There was no need to predrill for these screws. They were screwed straight through the rubber and into the soft pine with no problem.

Step 15: Finished Tires

Here are the finished tires all ready to be assembled.

Step 16: Assemble Tires 1 and 2

I propped up tire #2 onto a pair of sawhorses, and dropped tire #1 into place. It fit just fine, but I added a couple of clamps to hold it in place while I snapped a photo and fetched some 2 1/2" screws.

See photo three for details on where the screws are fastened.

Step 17: Attach the Halves of Tire Number 3

Both halves of tire #3 were then screwed in place as well.

This took a little bit of acrobatics and maneuvering to get the drill in position for attaching screws inside of the tireball, especially for the final half of tire 3.

Step 18: That's It!

This was an interesting project and I learned a lot along the way.

I'd love to hear any thoughts or feedback on this project, especially if you have experience cutting up old tires . . . what tools did you use, how did it go, any tricks, etc.

Thanks for taking a look!

<p>I'm not a farmer, but here in the upper midwest I've seen pig farmers use bowling balls in the pen for the pig's &quot;enrichment&quot;. I think horses also like to play with stuff like this. I would think zoos would be interested too.</p><p>I've worked as an artist for 20 years and I really appreciate the sculptural quality of your &quot;up cycled&quot; work. I also like functional art very much. Good work.</p>
My pet tiger, Angelica, would absolutely love this!! My and my tiger thank you!
<p>wery gooood.</p>
<p>I love this sculpture and I appreciate the fact that you went through so many blades to get the final piece. I've tried cutting through the tyre tread and it's not as easy as the people who make those cool half tire seesaws make it out to be. </p>
<p>This is so cool. use spray paint to capture the contour of mdf , smart!</p>
I think I have seen this going to school!
<p>Will never make it (how to find tires and room for that in my town?) but it is huge and I love it.</p>
<p>Great project, I especially love that photo of the bent saw. </p>
<p>this is great!!its really amazing!</p>
<p>that would be cool to have a bunch of those connected together as a jungle gym</p>
You are wrong on one point....you are an artist.<br> great job,<br> and shame on the people that ask what its for &quot;Art needs no purpose it just is&quot;
<p>Cool! You should sell these to zoos for their large animals.</p>
<p>enrichment for the elephants. Dude even I want to play with this.</p>
<p>Love it ! </p>
<p>Agree, this would look great suspended from a tree like the ultimate tyre swing! </p><p>Brilliant work on the instructable. Totally replicable. </p>
<p>I have cut up car tires in the past....</p><p>I did not have the luxury of a saws all, so I had to do it by hand...</p><p>I started out with a box cutter on the side wall; 5 minutes later, I switched to a utility knife; about 20 later, I switched to a cross cut saw(I was thinking the larger teeth could/would cut or rip through the side wall); finally, I went with a hack saw....</p><p>It went through the side wall like a hot knife going through warm butter....</p><p>When I got to the actual tread of the tire, I don't remember exactly how long it took, but I know it was more than 2 HOURS....</p><p>That was about 12, maybe 15 years ago(about the year 2000)...since then, I have built a hydraulic machine that literally slices the tire clean through instead of sawing through it....</p><p>I use old tire pieces for the roof of various animal &amp; bird houses(squirrels, song birds, owls, pigeons, etc).</p><p>I needed a set of elbow pads a while back, so I cut up a tire &amp; made my own...</p><p>whatever I need, I usually try to make it as opposed to buying it....it may not be as stylish, but I can promise you I'll get more miles out of it.</p><p>OH! you said you only went through 6 blades? I think I was up to 15 or 20 blades by the time I was finished sawing that tire.... 80 ) </p>
<p>cool project well demonstrated! I might have to think of a way to make a smaller version. I like the idea of hanging it from a big old tree as art</p>
<p>hanging it from a tree? </p><p>hmmmmmm.....</p><p>maybe something like a bird feeder on steroids?? LOL</p>
<p>You are insane! Totally awesome.</p>
<p>This is one of the best instructables I've ever read. Very logical and easy to follow. Does it easily roll? Thanks for sharing it!</p>
<p>nice, nice, but ...What is the goal? What can we do with this ball?</p>
<p>This looks so cool, I'm imagining the world's largest ball chair casters made from four of these or a man's size version of that silly vacuum. <br><br>Do you really need to cut #3 right through? Can't the tire be flattened enough to slip between #1 &amp; #2? </p>
<p>I only have one question - does it bounce? <br><br>You've done a great job. Don't know what you will use it for, but I would definitely want to throw with at things. Just has this shape...</p>
<p>Wonder if it would work to take the tires to a Makerworks-kinda place and cut the tires using lasers or plasma cutting torches? Ventilation might be a problem. </p>
Lasers probably wouldn't like the numerous layers making up a tire, atleast not without a massive amount of power... But a cutter big enough to fit the tire i would think would have the balls. Plasma wouldn't work on the rubber- there needs to be an electical circuit for the arc
<p>Waterjet cutter. See </p><p><a href="http://www.omax.com/learn/what-materials-can-waterjet-cut" rel="nofollow">http://www.omax.com/learn/what-materials-can-waterjet-cut</a></p>
<p>Also, if cutting with a waterjet, maybe the steel reinforcement could be left in the tires, making the final assembly stronger and maybe eliminating the need for the wood blocks?</p>
Great use of tyres, but what have you used them for? Garden sculptures? <br>
<p>Why do I have the sudden desire to try and pick that up. It looks like it would be fun to throw around the yard, Strongman style. </p>
Well, you would have to be jeff strongman to lift it. It's ~300lbs of semi tire. Strong maybe if made from compact car tires, not the drive on flat variety
<p>Really awesome project! At first I wondered how the sculpture would hold together firmly. But I saw you supported the tires with the wooden pieces. Great work!</p>
could see a gym or cross fit place paying Good money for that beast to train with
<p>You <em>could </em>use it as a chair...</p>
<p>Sawsalls are made to be abused. I have worked demolition and construction, and in both I had no issues with the saw cutting all kinds of crap it was not intended for. The name says it all, &quot;saws all&quot;. But to get it to cut, sometimes you have to really lean on it. Blades bind, bend all to hells, and become unusable, but rarely snap.</p>
<p>Seamster, you've been pumping out some gems recently, the tobbogan ible the other day and then this one. Nice work. I am wondering if Spyder Bore-blade blades might work better to cut through the treads. Check them out if you haven't seen them. Not sure if they'd work or not. The wood inserts are awesome. I see potential in that technique to repurpose old car tires into cart tires. I imagine the sculpture you made would be useful for something beyond art too though not sure what.</p>
<p>I'm thinking Death-ball tire swing! You are now officially an artist by the way. I've seen &quot;artists&quot; with much more questionable art.</p>
<p>Fantastic! I love tire projects ;-)</p>
It might prove easier to slice the side walls with a box cutter. or a saw that can make long slow cuts so it doesn't melt the rubber.
<p>Very very nice, I liked it a lot!</p>
<p>I like the sculpture. Good use for old tires.</p><p>My suggestions:</p><p>Paint the wood blocking black so it is not as visible.</p><p>If you are worried about the screws pulling out, maybe try Fastenmaster Headlok screws. You can buy them at Home Depot. They are special lag screws with an over-sized flat head that will probably not pull through the rubber.</p><p>If you are going to leave that outside, make sure it doesn't hold any water so its not a mosquito breeder.</p><p>Also, I wonder if adding some type of lubricant while cutting would make cutting the tires easier. Maybe prevent the rubber from melting and sticking to the blade. I tried cutting up a tire with my reciprocating saw one time and gave up because it was such slow going.</p>
<p>I can't stop thinking that if made from bigger tires it could accomodate a person inside. For a ride.</p>
<p>Me ha encantado y adem&aacute;s muy bien explicado.</p><p>--</p><p>I was delighted and also very well explained.</p>
<p>That's really cool. Do you think the joints of the halves (step 17) would be tough enough to leave this with a schoolyard full of teens?</p>
<p>This is great! Who wouldn't love some vulcanized geometric art!</p>
I love this design, it's even better than your fantastic pallet build tutorial. Under no circumstances should you set it on fire and roll it down that hill!
<p>Although this would make it eligible for the apocalypse preparedness contest as a mad max style defense device (if you live on a hill) :)</p>
<p>Very cool, well done!</p>
<p><strong>* Mind Blown.</strong></p><p>With all that bracing, You could almost make a Robot out of that !</p><p>Oddy enough I have a few spare tires in the bed of my truck... &gt;.&gt;</p>
Thumbs up dude. That design kept so simple, yet so perfect.
<p>that is really cool!!</p>

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Bio: I got an old sewing machine when I was just a kid, and I've been hooked on making stuff ever since. My name is ... More »
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