Introduction: Tit Bird Feeder From Kitchen Spatula

Picture of Tit Bird Feeder From Kitchen Spatula

This instructable is more about caring about our little friends Tit Birds, and reasonable usage of food products rather then the feeder itself (because it's not working wery well).

So why do we care about Tit Birds?

Step 1:

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Because they are cute as hell!

Also they're great helpers at the gardens. During the Winter they eat bug larvas hidden in tree bark, and at the Spring and Summer they eat bugs themself. They eat all bugs but a lot of them are harmfull pests.

Step 2:

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In order to survive the Winter, Tits (and it was quiet a discovery for me, when I googled the name for translation) need to have a reliable source of fat in their ration. And this is where we'll talk a bit about salo.

Here in Ukraine we love salo (I'm not the author of the picture), it is a national product, and you can read about it in this wikipedia article (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salo_(food)). Basicaly salo is raw pig fat with skin and some meat inclusions (or without meat at all), which can be preserved by salting, smoking and other ways. Salo is a great Winter fat source for Tit Birds and they like it a lot.

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But first, we have to make the feeder (if you decided to do so rather than use simpler way about which I'll talk at the end of the instructable).

I've got a pair of these cheep wooden spatulas that came as bonus with some bakery products. The markings on one of them are representation of future transformations.

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And here's the transformations and the tools I've used to accomplish them.

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I finished it with a coat of boiled sunflower oil. This is the feeder now, and I'll show you how it works a bit later.

Step 6: Prepare the Salo

Picture of Prepare the Salo

Because now it's time to prepare our salo. And this is a "rational usage of food products" part.

In our family we always collect leftover pieces of this product that aren't that fresh anymore to be eaten (although it can be kept in the fridge for a long time), and we use it for Tit Birds at Winter. But at first we have to cut off any salt or seasonings because it's not good for the birds. I'm planing to melt those cut offs into technical grade lard and make outdoor candles with it, but this is a project for the other day.

Step 7:

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When we have our pieces ready, we can attach them to the feeder with a twine using holes and notches we've made in the spatula earlier (now their mysterious nature is revealed!!)

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The simpler way to feed a Tit Birds with a salo I was mentioning, is just to tie a twine to the piece and tie other end to the branch. But it's not that easy, sometimes, to tie a knot in cold conditions, and you have to take the twine off the tree at the Spring, because it can grow into the branch. In this way my feeder is winning, because you can just hook it on and even reach a higher spot. But in the same way it looses, because strong wind can knock it off the branch, and currently local cats heve already stolen the thing. Also you can bunch a few pieces of salo on it, which is harder to do with just twine, so maybe making deeper cut for hook opening can redeem this design.

Unfortunately I didn't photographed the birds at my feeder, because it's hard to get close enough without scaring them, and my camera gives me more frustration than photos. So here's some pictures from google image search results.

Aso I'm understanding that such product as salo may not be available in you country but it can be substituted with a bacon, for example, or lard, or any animal fat in any other form until it contains no salt or seasonings. Just make some research.

So. This is it. Thank you for your attention and have a nice Ti... time... I was thinking about time.

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