I like hanging my welding helmet, sand blast hood, magnifiers and ear protectors on hooks in my shop.  I often find myself grabbing them to complete a quick project and dislike having to rummage through a more secure place for them.

Unfortunately, whenever I bump into them, they take a tumble and land on the floor... Not good for lenses or electronics.  I've devised a simple hook arrangement that locks my headgear securely in place, yet allows for "grab-n-go" removal.

Step 1: What You'll Need

1 Screw Hook Loop (I used 1" & 5/8" OD... What I had... Any size should work).
1 "S" hook (large enough to go around the band of your headgear)
Oh, and don't worry about not getting it right away. Once I had to fly to Virginia to show a patent examiner how something worked. It was as simple a concept as this, but often, simplicity is the most difficult thing to comprehend. We over-think most things.
I'm having a little trouble visualizing this. Are the eye bolts facing down? If so, what makes the S-hooks swing up? Typically S-hooks just hang down with nothing on them and continue to hang down when something is placed on them. Maybe a video would help.
A video would be too easy... Here's a few sketches to describe it:<br><br>1 The hooks hang down. You're right about the &quot;S&quot; hook hanging straight down as well.<br><br>2 Slip the headband of your head gear over the &quot;S&quot; hook with the majority of the gear behind the hooks as shown.<br><br>When you let go, the heavy end of the head gear will drop and cause the &quot;S&quot; hook to swing up, making it impossible for the head gear to accidentally slip off.<br><br>Hope this helped.
OK, I think I got it. You're using the fact that the headband can't turn in the hook without moving the hook. Thus, it balances with the S-hook in the horizontal position. Briliant! Thanks.
Thanks... I don't know if it's brilliant, but thank you for the compliment.
you really should patent this idea. you might be a millionaire some day.
I developed and patented products throughout my career and gave it up when I retired. Too much government stupidity and too many lawyers.<br><br>Unfortunately, in the U.S., patents are issued to the person who comes up with the idea first, so anyone who wants to file a utility application in the U.S. on this device is out of luck.<br><br>However... Most other countries issue patents to the first person who applies for it.<br><br>Sooo... Here's YOUR chance to become a millionaire:)<br><br>(I did a real quick patent search and didn't find anything like it, so it may actually be patentable. Check it out. I've taken it as far as I want.)
Thank you Shannon. Simple is always best, but unfortunately, it's the complicated things that sell. :/<br>
excellent idea.
Thank you Rich. Every once in a while my brain works:)

About This Instructable


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Bio: Retired inventor, reverted back to my 10year-old self. A shop full of tools, a boat, race car, 3D printer & a beautiful wife who wants me ... More »
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