Food Plot Survival (FPS)
Having the infrastructure in place to thrive in a grid down society.

Food Plot Survival is a concept of wildlife conservation and self preservation. Growing crops that will help feed the wildlife in lean winter months while at the same time can provide food and sustenance for me and mine should the need arise.

Step 1: We will start by recycling old plastic barrels, these barrels must be split in half.

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great instructable! one question, I've had mine running for a couple months now, and bugs haven't been a problem, until today, I killed three cockroaches inside the drum. How do you recommend preventing such disgusting bugs from getting in my worm bin? Am I just feeding too much?
Thanks for this, will print it out and give to my mother to see if she can use it. I'm sure she can, so I'll give it a shot. :)
I love this idea but when I bought red wigglers to stock my homemade worm farm in the basement, they all tried to escape through the top that was not fastened down. I had to get a Rubbermaid tote with a tight fitting lid to keep them corralled. I think they would all be gone with your lid propped up like that for ventilation. <br> <br>I do want to try to make a top bar hive with your Instructable and I did make a couple of horse feeders using these instruction.
Generally, if the worms are trying to get out then there is something in there they didn't like. Too much moisture, not enough moisture, too much citrus waste etc. Worms also don't like onion skins, it burns them. <br> <br>If you provide a happy home they will be content and stay there... with the lid off.
This happened when I first stocked my bin and I know this is why I lost my first bin of worms. I only feed them fruits, no citrus, and vegetables. When ever I open the bin, there are some that have climbed to the top so I flip them back in. They have the wanderlust.
Any tips for what to do w/worms in the winter - it is too cold here Dec-March for them to be in the composter. <br>Any ideas appreciated.
Yes. Make sure the sides are insulated with something, such as straw. You can use a light bulb to keep them warm in the winter, but also...fresh horse manure will keep them warm &amp; it happens to be their favourite food.
I am going to take a large 1 gallon glass container and put an electrical heat tape inside it (the kind that keeps your pipes from freezing in the winter). <br><br>I will then bury the glass jar in the middle of my worm container. The heat tape should warm the entire surface of the glass container and allow the worms something warm to snuggle up to. In addition, I will lay a heavily quilted moving blanket over the top to keep out the wind but still allow it to breath.<br>
I have cut these barrels before (to make worm bin's) and found that a circular saw works much better, the barrel doesn't jump around.
An awesome Instructable! <br> <br>Why do I need 5 extra barrel halves? <br> <br>I have the barrels and this is next on the list. What part of the country do you live in? <br> <br>Do I need to build a well insulated nest for the worm bin to set in during the winter months? Straw bales or similar?
Hello, I have more instructables coming up and it was easier to cut them all at once. My home is in Ohio, I will transfer the worms to one of those cut barrels. The barrel will be half buried in the ground with straw bales and mulch covering it.
An old carpenters trick: If you put the corner of a square on a circle, the points where the outside edges cross the circle will be the ends of a diameter. (Draw two diameters to find the center). <br> <br>This always works. From high school geometry, an inscribed angle cuts off an arc that is twice as big as the angle. Since the square is 90 degrees, the arc will be 180 degress, or half the circle.
brilliant! can't believe I've never realized that!
great idea

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