Introduction: Up-Cycled Homemade Scooter

Picture of Up-Cycled Homemade Scooter

This is my attempt to keep up with my little ones on their scooters. They like zooming around the driveway and I cant help but get a little nostalgic. I will try and explain thru my steps what I am doing. I took pics along the way hoping to inspire any one else. But I constantly changed plans from the very beginning. You can tell from my dismantling of the bike that it wasn't necessary. This is because originally it was gonna be a hybrid. I was going to take out the pedal hub and top cross bar. Install a standing platform and be able to sit on the seat while cruising. That was a bust.

The geometry just didn't work out. So youll see in my ible that I ended up using a piece of 1" rigid conduit as the frame. I lost the seat aspect but I guess that would have looked a little lazy anyways.

Hope you all like the idea and the instructions are clear enough to be repeatable.

Step 1: Tools &Materials

Materials

26" Huffy

12" Kids bike

6' of 1" Rigid Conduit

1/4" Steel Plate-4"x8"

6"x18"-3/4" plywood

A few wood screws

Tools

Sawzall

1" conduit bender

Wrenches(de-construction)

Stick welder

6011 welding rods

drill

Portaband

Step 2: Donors

Picture of Donors

The old bikes are some that I have collected from pawn shops, trash cans, or friends that upgrade. I will always take a free bike. And would be glad to pass one off to a person in need. But they just pile up. No biggie. They will now come in handy.

The little one is one that my son outgrew. I know I could pass it on down to the next person. The part about that is this bike is for looks. It is meant for a 2' tall kid but with the full suspension it weighs about 50 pounds. So haters be warned. I cut it up and reuse it for my own project. If this upsets you, don't look any further.

Step 3: Chop Chop

Picture of Chop Chop

This is my original idea of using just the bike. So I disassemble the hub. Reverse thread. my first time taking one apart. It's super easy. Eventually I cut the bottom tube and just leave the front end and tube.

The pic on the bandsaw is a piece of scrap that I eventually use on the rear end connection. The other piece is used to assemble the step plate to the frame.

Pieces:

Front end of a 26" bike

Front brake from the bike

6' of 1" Rigid

Step 4: Welding Tidbits

Picture of Welding Tidbits

There is not much that I can instruct upon on this segment. There are instructables out there that will teach you very well on how to weld. There are even ible's that will teach you how to make a welder. I will leave all of the research to you on that level. I will say that I was always overwhelmed by any task that had to with welding. I would tell my friend what I needed and leave it all up to him.

That is ok, but, I always like to be able to have 100% hands on all the time. If I get halfway thru a job and want to throw it away, so be it. When Ed was involved it felt more like it was not all mine. So I started watching and learning. It is way better in my mind to have this ability. Now go weld!!

Step 5: Putting the Pieces Together

Picture of Putting the Pieces Together

The first pic is my mock up. I went back with a bandsaw and did some cutting to make the butt joint more precise. I guess I forgot to take a pic?

The second pic shows how it is rounded out a bit.

The third is of the plate that holds the rear end to the frame

and the last pic is how I mounted the rear end.


Really nothing much to do.

Step 6: First Test Drive

Picture of First Test Drive

I took it out for the first time on my lunch break. I was constantly tweaking the foot placement. Which made me realize that it's super uncomfortable to stand on a pipe for 2 miles. So I went back to the shop. used a couple scrap pieces of steel laying around for a bracket. A small piece of plywood with a beautiful notch.

And tada. A million times more comfortable.

Step 7: Paint and Finish

Picture of Paint and Finish

This part is pretty simple. Try and make it not look like Frankenstein. I shot it all with a little spray paint. Flat black for the frame.

Hot, fluorescent, Pink for the board and back wheel. Yes, I let my 5 year old daughter help with the creative output side.

The wheel was not very clean and did not look like it will stick. But It really looks good.

Step 8: Voilà

Picture of Voilà

Comments

Pjsales (author)2016-05-13

I just love scooters, this one looks great, just needs a more shiny paint.

kavish laxkar (author)2016-05-12

good

Lead Wings (author)2016-05-11

I've been toying with the idea of making an electric powered big wheel kick scooter - your DIY looks like just the ticket for the frame!

dalegribble (author)Lead Wings2016-05-12

that would be awesome! Motor on the front?

Lead Wings (author)dalegribble2016-05-12

thinking back - would make it safer in the wet. And also would keep power cable runs shorter

lglira (author)2016-05-10

cool design but I worried about stability?

dalegribble (author)lglira2016-05-10

I was surprised in the end It rides like a cadill

Yonatan24 (author)2016-05-10

That's a really good idea! I wish I had a Welder so I could make one!

dalegribble (author)Yonatan242016-05-10

King of Random is out there to help DIY guru like you.

https://www.instructables.com/id/Homemade-Stick-Wel...

Yonatan24 (author)dalegribble2016-05-10

Well... Yup!

I've seen all of his videos in his MOT welding series-- 3 Times!

In the future, I'll probably make it, But it isn't for me now... :)

j4v1jh (author)2016-05-09

This is a great idea!! Congrats!

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