Upcycled Table Saw Clock

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Posted in TechnologyClocks

Introduction: Upcycled Table Saw Clock

About: Hi guys, my name is Luan Retief. If you are reading this it means you have found me on instructables for which I am very grateful. A little bit about myself: I am a tool room manager at quite a big company i...

This is an easy project that will inspire you to use everyday objects in a creative way to create an art piece.

It is also great as a present or for keeping time in the workshop!

It is a lot like the following two instructables, but I feel that using a blade with a large hole in the middle and leaving out the numbers leaves you with a neater, cleaner looking clock. I also feel like using the wood makes it more "house friendly".

https://www.instructables.com/id/Table-Saw-Blade-Cl...

https://www.instructables.com/id/Saw-Clock/

What do you need:

  • An old table saw blade (or new if you really want to)
  • Screws
  • Wood (I used pallet wood)
  • Glue
  • Clock mechanism and hands
  • A drill
  • A router
  • A table saw
  • A sander
  • Clamps

Step 1: Make the Wooden Backplate

Start by cutting the wooden planks to size. You can either measure them precisely before cutting them, or you can cut them to similar sizes and cut a proper square once they are glued together. As you can see in my third picture, my pieces did not line up perfectly, so I just trimmed of the edges with a table saw after gluing them.

After cutting your pieces to size, thoroughly apply glue to the sides, spread is out evenly and tightly clamp them together.

Once the glue has dried properly, trim of any unwanted edges and sand the wood until you are happy with the appearance. Although I made a square, I think a rectangle would look pretty good too.

Step 2: Attach the Saw Blade

Before attaching the blade to the wood, sand it down to the finish that you like. I don't think anyone would want to put a rusty/dirty saw blade in their home (unless it goes with the style of the room of course). Just be careful of accidentally damaging the natural circular grind lines of the blade.

Place the blade in the centre of the square and screw it into place. If you are worried that something will go wrong and the blade will go off centre, I have 4 different solutions for you!

  1. Clamp the blade into position.
  2. Mark the holes, remove the blade and drill guide holes on the markings. Now simply put the blade back in place and insert screws into the guide holes.
  3. If you started drilling/screwing and then realised that you are not in the right spot, just rotate the blade so that it hides the incorrect hole and start over.
  4. If you are done attaching the blade and only then realise that it is not centred, you can trim some wood from the side where there is excess space. Just make sure you work carefully if you decide to do this.

Step 3: Attaching the Machine

Find the centre of the square and drill a hole just big enough for the mechanism shaft to fit through it. Always drill from the front to the back to avoid damaging the display side. Now use a router to clear out an area large enough on the back for the mechanism body to fit into.

Now all that is left to do is to attach the clock hands and there you have it! You can also add wall hangers etc depending on where you want to use it.

Thank you for reading and have a nice day!

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    4 Comments

    Nope, only a clear varnish. But if you get the right color blade and stain you could create quite a nice contrast.

    Less is more!

    Most old blade shop clocks have the numbers painted or mounted, your presentation is most effective because it has no such convention yet is easily understood- nice work! ☺

    1 reply

    Thank you for the kind words! At first I had a 8 pinhole blade, but that would not have worked with the numbering. The 6 holes gives it a nice 10min count I think! (Also ment I did not have to add numbering)