Instructables
First of all, my blog/the original.

Second of all, I would like to mention how easy Instructables is to use. It's just so much easier to give instructions when you can label your pictures and answer comments.

Lets get to business...

A couple years ago I followed this instructable: Add a rapid-fire button to your mouse using a 555 timer

It was easy to follow, the schematics were a bit confusing. It only works on wired mice (mice that run at 5 volts), but in the end I accomplished it.

Today is 2013 and my desk is a little more cluttered than before. I found a cheap wireless mouse in Hong Kong and I loved it. It extremely portable and compact. It wasn't glitchy and it was easy to use.

The sad part was that I had to give up my rapid fire button, which meant giving up the ease of firing pistols at lightning speed in Counter-Strike.
I looked all over the internet to try to find how I could add a rapid-fire button to a wireless (1.5 volt) mouse, and the only thing that could help me was this.

It seems like no one has gotten it working yet, so I decided to try.

Here is a video of it working:


 
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mechagen10 months ago
Ok I'm incredibly slow when it comes to circuits. When I tried to do this with my mouse that had three pins (a b c, as you described) I messed up and had to find a new mouse it still has three pins (a b c) but its older than the last mouse (no scroll wheel, imagine that...). It's a Mitsumi circuit board and the cord that connects the computer and circuit board has these words next to the wires

Large black - Shield
Small black - G
Brown - Data
Orange - +B
Red - Clk

Which of these would be ground and which is Vcc (that means power right?) if you can help it'll be much appreciated.
TSJWang (author)  mechagen10 months ago

Oh wow that is a pretty old mouse.

In that case it is probably a PS/2 mouse (please tell me if it is not). Make sure you can use it with your computer first before you modify it! Not many computers use serial or ps/2 or parallel or....

Anyways here is the information on PS/2

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PS/2_port

I'm guessing small black is GND... It doesn't look like the circuit board listed Vcc...

To check if the small black wire is GND and to find Vcc connect a voltmeter - to the black wire and the + to any other wire. the wire that gives a steady 5v is most likely Vcc.

I'm pretty sure G is ground, so make sure that is right :P

Tell us how you did!

mechagen1 year ago
Ok now I have another issue my mouse button has three possible connections THREE of them. So how do I test which one of them to use? Would I solder everything besides the left button then switch which of the pins I'm connected too to see what's what. Or can you just tell me which to use
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TSJWang (author)  mechagen1 year ago
Ah those
So those toggle switches have three pins. Pin A, B, C.
When the button is not pressed, for example, pin A and B are connected. B is in the center.
when the button is pressed, B is connected to C and disconnected from A.
So what I would do is look for which two pins are connected when you do not press them. When you find those pins (they should be directly next to each other) the middle pin is probably the source of signal. The pin farthest out is probably useless, so you can ignore that pin.

Now you are left with two pins. In my example, pin B and C.
I'm pretty sure, but I might be wrong, that the middle pin is to signal (B). That means that pin C is to the processor. Now you have to determine if your click is sensed when that pin goes LOW or HIGH. I think for wired mice it's usually HIGH. Check the voltage while the button is pressed to determine whether it's HIGH or LOW.
If it's HIGH, you don't need a transistor.

Hope that helps!
Can you elaborate about how you use an arduino as an oscilloscope?
TSJWang (author)  audreyobscura1 year ago
Hey Audrey,

So basically you have the Arduino reading an analog pin and sending those numbers to the serial port.
The processing sketch (which I did not write, only changed a bit) takes those numbers and represents them graphically, like Excel. It displays the voltage over time.
It's not exactly an oscilloscope, more like a graphical voltmeter, but it serves it's purpose well. The download is in step 2. Thanks!
jkristensen19 months ago

Do you know if this would work on a Logitech M510?

TSJWang (author)  jkristensen19 months ago
The circuit works on any mouse
The only concern is probably about how you would fit the button and circuit into the mouse.
That's probably the most difficult part; fitting the circuit in.

I see, thanks! Also, does it have to be a LMC555 IC? Could I use a NE555 IC?

Orngrimm1 year ago
Nice! Ages ago (With PS/2 mice and no USB even known) i made one like this but with adjustable frequency. It rocked with the first counterstrike and its pistols. Empty a mag in 0.5secs? Deadly firepower if you are on target! ;)
TSJWang (author)  Orngrimm10 months ago

Yea :P

The current CS GO puts a limit on how fast it can fire, and also they made the recoil a bit more difficult.

It's still a useful button though; it makes me a bit more comfortable using pistol.

mechagen1 year ago
Ok so what pins are together connected and with what it's hard to see in the pictures
TSJWang (author)  mechagen10 months ago

I just realized I never replied to this, sorry.

Could you be more specific? It's connected just the way it is in the schematic.

mechagen10 months ago
Ok this sounds like a stupid question but what voltage do I set my multimeter to? And how do I test my tactile switch leads for GND and Vcc
TSJWang (author)  mechagen10 months ago

lol its okay any questions.

To test voltage you turn your multimeter counter clockwise 3 clicks (the V== (20))

to test continuity, turn your multimeter to the third red thing when turning clockwise (the thing that looks like a diode).

Connect black to the small black wire (the thing that is possibly ground) and the red one to other wires to test for a steady 5v reading).

mechagen10 months ago
This is my multimeter
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TSJWang (author) 1 year ago
Hi guys,
Quick update:
So my button broke because I was a bit rough on it. I replaced it.
It turns out this circuit CAN work at lower voltages than 1.5v, for example, 1.1 volt, which is about when your mouse should start dying.

So, it was just a button glitch, everything works even nicer.
jasar1 year ago
Does this method also work on wired mice?
TSJWang (author)  jasar1 year ago
I think there is already an instructables on that. This one is just in general but more concentrated on wireless. The concept is the same: check out mechagen's comments.
mechagen1 year ago
I also have a nm555p or something for my 555 ic will it work the same?
TSJWang (author)  mechagen1 year ago
Huh, I've never heard of that. You should look for a datasheet and scan through it for it's minimum voltage rating.
If you can't find one I think RadioShack might have those TLC555 timers... I'm not sure if they work but they claim to be low power.
Well that might be because i typed in the wrong kind of timer its actually a NE555P timer and it came from a "Electronics Learning Lab" from RadioShack. Except it didn't come with this "datasheet" you speak of, and where would i even find such a thing. The "Lab" came with book and it doesn't say if it can run on low power or what it can run on to begin with. Then again i'm using a wired mouse so would it make a difference?
TSJWang (author)  mechagen1 year ago
Ah,
I think NE555 timers are not low power. If it was it would be advertised clearly, saying like CMOS or LOW POWER or something
If you have a wired mouse you're fine! I only made this instructables if you are having trouble with wireless mice.
NE555 should run fine at 5v
MrChay1 year ago
if you need 1.5v and not lower you could use a led voltage regulator board.. They are tiny and very efficient
mechagen1 year ago
This is what I'm understanding pins 1 and 2 are connected with the capacitor which then goes to pin 6 and that's the extent of my understanding
TSJWang (author)  mechagen1 year ago
Pin 1 is connected to ground and the - of the capacitor
Pin 2 is connected to the + of the capacitor and pin 6
Hope that helps.
umm most mise out there are either 3v or living. so the living ones might try to nimble on u tho
You could make a compromise with this one:
http://www.instructables.com/id/Mouse-Mouse!/
:D