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Well, this is what to do in a car crash, most of this info is from SAS survival handbook, the dangerous book for boys and my god (google) so um lets get started.(oh and this is my first instructable so dont be to harsh)

Step 1: If It Is a Minor Accident

Information to collect if possible at the time of incident



Contact details including names, addresses and telephone numbers of drivers, pedestrians and passengers involved. If a party is driving within the course of his employment, take both the driver and the employer's details. It may be worth noting a description of the driver, location and any distinguishing features
Time and date of the accident
Gather as many vehicle details including vehicle make, model, registration number, colour, any modifications and if relevant, the number of passengers in each vehicle
Whether the parties were using headlights and/or indicator lights
The weather, visibility and lighting conditions, including street lighting
Name, "collar number" and force details of any police officer attending and other emergency services details if appropriate
Identify the damage to each vehicle involved.
Identify any injuries to persons involved
If you have a camera, take some photographs of the accident scene


Useful information to jot down at the time or after the accident



A full description of what happened including sketches of the vehicles’ positioning.
Estimated speed of the vehicles involved
The type of road
A description of the scene of the accident, including any relevant road markings, signals, obstructions etc (i.e. skip outside property at road junction)
Whether the parties were using headlights or indicator


Reporting



It is an offence to refuse to give details to the other driver following an accident, if there has been injury or property damage
Accidents must be reported to the police within 24 hours
Inform your insurance company of the accident as quickly as possible. The company may refuse to insure you if you have not notified them of the accident within the time period set out in the policy.

Step 2: If It Is a Fatal Accident

Accident
Things to remember if you do have a crash.

1. Be Prepared to Act
If you crash and are severely injured, you will have to rely on bystanders for help. Fortunately that is the exception. If you are still conscious and mobile after your crash be prepared to act.

2. Get Off the Road
After a crash you might be disorientated and either lie or stand on the roadway. The first priority is to get off the road and avoid the risk of further injury. Then think about getting your bike off the road if you can do it safely.

If anyone is injured on the scene call the Police.

3. See if You Can Move Okay
If in doubt, ask someone to take you to a doctor or call an ambulance. Don’t act tough. If you don’t feel right, get help.

4. Be Cool
Don’t get upset. Don’t start blaming anyone. Don’t admit anything to anyone at this stage.

5. Get Witnesses and Details
If you have been hit by a car, exchange details with the driver. Write down the registration number of the car and the driver’s name, address and telephone number. You may wish to see the driver’s licence. Write down the location and time.
If there are witnesses, ask for their names, addresses and telephone numbers.

6. Get Checked Out
Even if you feel fine, go to a doctor straight away and have a check up. It can take hours or days before some effects of a crash, such as concussion or deep bruising, show up. If there is injury, you need to get treatment. Any you need to have evidence of the injury for later claims and compensation.

If someone has been injured or their property damaged tell the police. When you make a report ask for a copy of it.

Step 3: If You Are Fine

What to do if you have a crash

Stop immediately.
Use headlights, indicator lights or hazard lights to warn other drivers, and to light up the scene if it is dark.
If possible send someone to warn oncoming drivers.
Help the injured.
Dial your emergency number to make contact with Police (and/or Ambulance) if anyone is killed or injured, either your vehicle or the other vehicle needs to be towed away or you are unable to provide particulars to the owner.
Exchange drivers' names, addresses, registration numbers and names of vehicle owners with others involved in the crash.
Clear the road of broken glass and debris.
Check for injured people
Check for unconscious people.
Don't move anyone unless they are in immediate danger or require first aid.
Support broken limbs, and be careful not to twist the neck or back, if someone has to be moved.
Lift the visor of a helmet wearer, but do not remove the helmet unless the person is vomiting or has stopped breathing.
When removing a helmet, have one person support the head and neck while another gently lifts the helmet off from the back.
Make the crash scene as safe as possible
Watch out for your own safety, as well as that of others, after an accident has occurred and lookout for vehicles still using the road.

Post other people around the accident to keep traffic away.
Use headlights, indicator lights and hazard lights to warn other drivers (particularly at night).
Keep well clear if power lines are down and touching the damaged vehicles, or flammable goods are involved.
Ensure the motors of the vehicles involved are switched off.
Ensure there is no smoking at the scene of the accident.
Send for help
Someone should drive, phone or use a CB radio to get help.

All Emergency services can be contacted by dialling 000.
(some mobiles may require dialling 112)

Information which should be provided when making the call includes:

location of the accident
number injured and nature of injury
number trapped
whether emergency vehicles will be required at the scene
whether power lines are down, or flammable goods are involved.
Help the injured
Because most accident victims choke to death rather than die from their injuries, follow the DRABC of lifesaving.

Danger:

Check for any dangers to yourself, the injured or others, especially from vehicles still using the road
If possible reduce or remove the danger, but do not put yourself at risk
Response:

Check if the casualty is conscious
If the casualty is not conscious check the airway and send someone to ring 000 (some mobiles may require dialling 112 instead) for help
If the casualty is conscious manage any bleeding and send someone to ring 000 (some mobiles may require dialling 112 instead) for help
Airways:

Turn the victim onto their side
Tilt the head back.
Point the face to the ground
Clear the mouth with fingers
Check for breathing
Breathing:

If casualty is not breathing start expired air resuscitation (EAR)
If breathing returns place in the recovery position
If breathing doesn't return feel for pulse
Circulation:

Check for a pulse on the neck (carotid pulse)
If pulse is absent begin CPR (Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation)
If pulse returns continue EAR until breathing resumes
If breathing returns check for bleeding
Don't use tourniquets.
Apply direct pressure to the wound to stop bleeding.
Avoid contact between the victim's blood and broken parts of your skin.
Never give accident victims food or drink.

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau's pamphlet "What to do at an accident scene before help arrives" provides more information and can be obtained by ringing free call 1800 621 372.

A number of organisations are accredited by WorkCover NSW to conduct first aid courses across the state. To find your closest first aid trainer ring WorkCover NSW on 13 10 50.

Step 4: Overall

I can not tell you what to do in every car crash because they are all different before you do anything you must survey your surroundings and if you can, help anyone you can.
<p>or if your BOTH alive, make sure you pull out your phone and start voice recording so when you sew them or the other way around, you have strong evedence</p>
it was a good post till you said this: <br>Turn the victim onto their side <br>Tilt the head back. <br>Point the face to the ground <br>Clear the mouth with fingers <br>Check for breathing <br>Breathing: <br>Please do not move ANY victims unless they are in a life threat, eg-car on fire, car about to fall over bridge, Cars do NOT explode- that only happens in Hollywood, Do worry about the airbags thay can explode if they havent deployed, also Do NOT put anyting in victims mouth this includes your fingers, Victims who are hypoxic will bite down So do NOT put your fingers in pt's mouth. Take a CPR current CPR course. PLEASE. They are taught by working professionals like myself who are in fact trained for such scenes.
It's all true, I've read the SAS survival guide (more than one). A few years ago I drove into a tree with 90km/h. I think I survived because I stayed calm. I wasn't unconscious that was a real help. I got out of the car by myself, I had to because there was a lot of smoke and leaking fluids. I have one tip to add... stay awake till you're sure that you're live is in good hands; because they (medical staff etc.) control your situation now and it's not your problem anymore till you wake up in the hospital. Good Instructable! Sorry for my English, it's not my first language.
A friend of mine who is a paramedic once told me that the ones who stay awake all the way to the hospital are usually the ones who survive. But that really depends on the severity of the incident. Staying awake till you're in the clear is a great idea though
... and some foto's! LOL
So what do you do if you're unconscious? :S
In the United States, all working and connected phones MUST provide access to emergency services by dialing 911, even if the phone does not have paid service. In otherwords, if you have a charged cell phone, but the phone is not activated, it will still call 911 for an emergency. All pay phones allow access to 911, as do any landline. If calling from a cell phone, be especially clear about your location, as cell phones sometimes connect you to the wrong police/law enforcement station. State the city and, (if near the border of a state/country) the state/providence. The very first thing to do, in any situation other than a minor "fender bender" is to dial 911. Police will help assess damages, help you exchange information, and call for other emergency services if needed (not to mention help with some medical problems if an ambulance has not arrived). I don't know where jackdaun is from, but here in the US, do NOT dial 000, instead dial 911. It works on every phone.
good to mention that if a person is severely injured its sometimes better to leave them alone and let the paramedics take care of it because improperly moving someone could do more harm than good other than that good points
&quot;Accidents must be reported to the police within 24 hours&quot;<br/><br/>That will vary on the local laws. Here, it isn't *required* to report to the police. (If it's a very minor accident, many people don't bother with getting a police report. They just deal w/each other &amp; each other's insurance companies.)<br/>
not hear in the UK they dont! infact if nobodys injured you dont evaen call them at all. Good bit of advice in this 'ible' though cheers:)
That was quick and well done.
Very well done, and a mighty quick entry, time-wise 5/5

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